3

I have this data.frame object:

subject <- c("Nantes", "Nantes", "Nantes", "Brest", "Brest", "Rennes")
page <- c(1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 1)
rows <- c(2, 3, 4, 6, 2, 3)
df <- data.frame (subject,page, rows)

Here's the output :

subject   page    rows 
Nantes    1       2     
Nantes    2       3     
Nantes    3       4     
Brest     1       6     
Brest     2       2     
Rennes    1       3

Nantes's subject : pages 1 page2, page 3.
Each page has different number of rows. For Nantes, page1 has 2 rows.

what I want: duplicate each row based on 1:nrow sequence.

for Example: I need to dpulicate Nantes page 1 two times

subject   page    rows 
Nantes    1       1     
Nantes    1       2     
Nantes    2       1 
Nantes    2       2
Nantes    2       3
Nantes    3       1
Nantes    3       2
Nantes    3       3
Nantes    3       3
Nantes    3       4 
Brest     1       1
Brest     1       2 
Brest     1       3 
Brest     1       4 
Brest     1       5 
Brest     1       6     
Rennes    1       1
Rennes    1       2
Rennes    1       3

Based on dplyr duplicate each line by a sequence I can use unnest function but not able to solve my problem.

5

If you group by the other columns, you could use tidyr::complete with seq to fill in the missing observations:

library(tidyverse)

df <- data_frame(subject = c("Nantes", "Nantes", "Nantes", "Brest", "Brest", "Rennes"),
                 page = c(1,2,3,1,2, 1),
                 rows = c(2, 3, 4, 6, 2, 3))

df_expanded <- df %>% 
    group_by(subject, page) %>% 
    complete(rows = seq(rows))

df_expanded
#> # A tibble: 20 x 3
#> # Groups:   subject, page [6]
#>    subject  page  rows
#>      <chr> <dbl> <dbl>
#>  1   Brest     1     1
#>  2   Brest     1     2
#>  3   Brest     1     3
#>  4   Brest     1     4
#>  5   Brest     1     5
#>  6   Brest     1     6
#>  7   Brest     2     1
#>  8   Brest     2     2
#>  9  Nantes     1     1
#> 10  Nantes     1     2
#> 11  Nantes     2     1
#> 12  Nantes     2     2
#> 13  Nantes     2     3
#> 14  Nantes     3     1
#> 15  Nantes     3     2
#> 16  Nantes     3     3
#> 17  Nantes     3     4
#> 18  Rennes     1     1
#> 19  Rennes     1     2
#> 20  Rennes     1     3

The advantage of this approach is that if one subject/page combination is already partially expanded it won't be duplicated.

6

In base R, you could do

dfNew <- data.frame(subject=rep(df$subject, df$rows),
                    page=rep(df$page, df$rows),
                    rows=sequence(df$rows))

rep with a vector argument in the second position repeats elements in the first position the corresponding number of times. sequence with an integer vector returns counts from 1 up to each value.

dfNew
   subject page rows
1   Nantes    1    1
2   Nantes    1    2
3   Nantes    2    1
4   Nantes    2    2
5   Nantes    2    3
6   Nantes    3    1
7   Nantes    3    2
8   Nantes    3    3
9   Nantes    3    4
10   Brest    1    1
11   Brest    1    2
12   Brest    1    3
13   Brest    1    4
14   Brest    1    5
15   Brest    1    6
16   Brest    2    1
17   Brest    2    2
18  Rennes    1    1
19  Rennes    1    2
20  Rennes    1    3

Maybe a little cleaner using with:

dfNew <- with(df, data.frame(subject=rep(subject, rows),
                             page=rep(page, rows),
                             rows=sequence(rows)))
  • 1
    Much better than do.call(rbind, lapply(split(df, paste(df$subject, df$page)), function(a) data.frame(subject = a$subject, page = a$page, rows = sequence(a$rows)))) – d.b Aug 29 '17 at 14:30
  • 1
    @d.b Yeah, I like the lapply / split method, but it can be pretty heavy on some problems. – lmo Aug 29 '17 at 14:32
3

We can use map from the purrr package to create a list of integer sequence in rows. After that, unnest the data frame. df2 is the final output.

library(tidyverse)

df2 <- df %>%
  mutate(rows = map(rows, seq)) %>%
  unnest()
  • map(rows, seq) would be a little simpler – alistaire Aug 29 '17 at 14:26
  • @alistaire Thanks for sharing your idea. I will update the answer based on your suggestion. – www Aug 29 '17 at 14:27
1

As long as it's not a massive data.frame, apply could also work

do.call(rbind, apply(X = df, MARGIN = 1, function(x)
    data.frame(subject = x[1],
               page = as.numeric(x[2]),
               rows = sequence(x[3]),
               row.names = NULL)))
  • Watch your types; you've turned page into a factor of numbers. – alistaire Aug 29 '17 at 14:48

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