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I'm a Lua developer but have recently entered the world of learning C++.

I noticed that C++ handles math calculations slightly differently. And I was wondering if there's an official name/explanation for why this happens, and if there's a way to get it to what I'm used to.

In Lua, the code is as follows;

local a = ( 4 / 3 ) * 3.1415 * ( 5 * 5 * 5 )
print( a ) // This returns 523.58333

In C++

int a;
a = ( 4 / 3 ) * 3.1415 * ( 5 * 5 * 5 );
cout << a; // This returns 392

Notice how although the syntax of the equation is exactly the same, the answers differ.

Thanks :)

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  • 2
    4/3 == 1 because integer division, use 4.0/3.0 Aug 29, 2017 at 21:28
  • I think he meant it rounds to 1 Aug 29, 2017 at 21:30
  • 1
    I noticed that C++ handles math calculations slightly differently. -- And Java, and C, and C#, etc. etc. They will all do what you are experiencing with your C++ code -- integer division. Aug 29, 2017 at 21:30
  • @CoryKramer Well now I feel dumb haha. Thanks! Aug 29, 2017 at 21:30
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    @kpjVideo You shouldn't, when you start versing yourself in other languages, you will find out the internals of every language are very different Aug 29, 2017 at 21:31

3 Answers 3

4

A better equivalent code is:

float a;
a = ( 4 / 3.0 ) * 3.1415 * ( 5 * 5 * 5 );
cout << a;

Notice how we use 3.0 in the division so it is a float division instead of integer division

2

In Lua you are doing float division

/: float division
//: floor division

As a result it is 1.333 * 3.145 * (5 * 5*5) which makes it is 523.583

Do in lua something like this

local a = ( 4 // 3 )  => 1* 3.1415 * ( 5 * 5 * 5 )
print( a )

You will get

392.6875 because of (1)*3.1415*5*5*5

As 4//3 (floor division) will return 1

use floor if you want result equivalent to c++ int

local a = ( 4 // 3 ) * 3.1415 * ( 5 * 5 * 5 )
print(math.floor(a))

Output

392

Whereas already c++ is strict based on the type

-2

Try declaring a as double and see what happens... This way, 4/3 evaluates to 1, and also 3.14 evaluates to 3. And there's your difference.

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  • It won't work. The compiler doesn't care to what variable an expression is going to be assigned when evaluating it, thus 4/3 will remain integer division. Aug 29, 2017 at 21:34
  • This will not solve the problem, the right hand side will be evaulated using int arithmetic until the * 3.14, but by then it is too late. Aug 29, 2017 at 21:35
  • I stand corrected. So, 4.0/3.0 AND double (or float) declaration is the way to go.
    – bocko
    Aug 29, 2017 at 21:42

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