1

Trying to perform ttest (and to get p.value) from a data.frame, there's one column that includes the groups (good vs bad) and the rest of the columns are numeric.

I generated a toy dataset here:

W <- rep(letters[seq( from = 1, to = 2)], 25)
X <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 10, sd = 5)
Y <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 15, sd = 6)
Z <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 20, sd = 5)
test_data <- data.frame(W, X, Y, Z)

Then I transform the data into long format:

melt_testdata <- melt(test_data)

And performed the t.test

lapply(unique(melt_testdata$variable),function(x){
  Good <- subset(melt_testdata, W  == 'a' & variable ==x)$variable
  Bad <- subset(melt_testdata, W == 'b' & variable ==x)$variable
  t.test(Good,Bad)$p.value
})

But I instead of getting the t.test results, I got the following error messages:

Error in if (stderr < 10 * .Machine$double.eps * max(abs(mx), abs(my))) stop("data are essentially constant") : 
  missing value where TRUE/FALSE needed In addition: Warning messages:
1: In mean.default(x) : argument is not numeric or logical: returning NA
2: In var(x) :
  Calling var(x) on a factor x is deprecated and will become an error.
  Use something like 'all(duplicated(x)[-1L])' to test for a constant vector.
3: In mean.default(y) : argument is not numeric or logical: returning NA
4: In var(y) :
  Calling var(x) on a factor x is deprecated and will become an error.
  Use something like 'all(duplicated(x)[-1L])' to test for a constant vector.

Then I tried to write loops (first time..)

good <- matrix(,50)
bad <- matrix(,50)
cnt=3
out <- rep(0,cnt)


for (i in 2:4){
  good[i] <- subset(test_data, W == 'a', select= test_data[,i])
  bad[i] <- subset(test_data, W == 'b', select= test_data[,i])
  out[i] <- print(t.test(good[[i]], bad[[i]])$p.value)
}

Still not getting p.values ....... This is the error messages

Error in x[j] : only 0's may be mixed with negative subscripts

I appreciate any help in any method, thanks!

  • Simply use $value instead of $variable as t-test require numeric vectors. – Parfait Aug 30 '17 at 20:38
2

I think you'll have better luck with the formula method of t.test. Try

library(broom)
library(magrittr)
library(dplyr)

W <- rep(letters[seq( from = 1, to = 2)], 25)
X <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 10, sd = 5)
Y <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 15, sd = 6)
Z <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 20, sd = 5)
test_data <- data.frame(W, X, Y, Z)

lapply(test_data[c("X", "Y", "Z")],
       function(x, y) t.test(x ~ y),
       y = test_data[["W"]]) %>% 
  lapply(tidy) %>% 
  do.call("rbind", .) %>% 
  mutate(variable = rownames(.))

Edit:

With stricter adherence to the dplyr philosophy, you can use the following: which is actually a bit cleaner looking.

library(broom)
library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

W <- rep(letters[seq( from = 1, to = 2)], 25)
X <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 10, sd = 5)
Y <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 15, sd = 6)
Z <- rnorm(n=50, mean = 20, sd = 5)

test_data <- data.frame(W, X, Y, Z) 

test_data %>% 
  gather(variable, value, X:Z) %>% 
  group_by(variable) %>% 
  do(., tidy(t.test(value ~ W, data = .)))
  • Thank you it works! I also tested it on my larger dataset and was fine too. Thanks a lot. I changed test_data[c("X", "Y", "Z")] to test_data[2:4], which is still working, that's great!! – Molly_K Aug 30 '17 at 20:22
  • Yes. If your grouping variable is your first column, you could also do test_data[-1] and get the same result. – Benjamin Aug 30 '17 at 20:24
  • I know it's a stupid question, but what does the . after data = mean (last line)? – Molly_K Aug 30 '17 at 20:38
  • It's a place holder. If you look at ?do, the arguments are do(.data, ...). By putting . in the first argument, it takes the data frame coming from the previous call. Putting it into data = . in t.test passes that data onto the function. (I'm not sure that made any sense) – Benjamin Aug 30 '17 at 20:40
  • Thank you Ben, this is really helpful. i will read up the function and learn how to use it. – Molly_K Aug 30 '17 at 20:46
0

Here is a solution using dplyr and the formula argument to t.test. do works on each group defined by the group_by. glance extracts values from the t.test output and makes them into a data.frame.

library(tidyverse)
library(broom)

melt_testdata %>% 
  group_by(variable) %>% 
  do(glance(t.test(value ~ W, data = .)))
  • Thank you @Richard Telford, it works well. What does data = . mean? – Molly_K Aug 30 '17 at 20:35
  • the . a part of the data.frame melt_testdata, which get split by variable. The data argument to t.test lets the formula access the variable in the data.frame (you get the same thing in lm) – Richard Telford Aug 30 '17 at 21:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.