6

Maybe it's just me, but the example in the man 2 page for membarrier seems pointless.

Basically, membarrier() is an asynchronous memory barrier that, given two coordinating pieces of code (let's call then fast path and slow path) allows you to move all the hardware cost of the the barrier to the slow path, and leave the fast path only with a compiler barrier1. There are a few different ways to accomplish the membarrier behavior, such as sending an IPI to each involved processor or wait for the code running on each processor to be de-scheduled - but the exact implementation details aren't important here.

Now, here's the example transformation given in the man page:

Original Code

static volatile int a, b;

static void
fast_path(void)
{
   int read_a, read_b;

   read_b = b;
   asm volatile ("mfence" : : : "memory");
   read_a = a;

   /* read_b == 1 implies read_a == 1. */

   if (read_b == 1 && read_a == 0)
       abort();
}

static void
slow_path(void)
{
   a = 1;
   asm volatile ("mfence" : : : "memory");
   b = 1;
}

Transformed Code

(some syscall and init boilerplate omitted)

static volatile int a, b;

static void
fast_path(void)
{
   int read_a, read_b;

   read_b = b;
   asm volatile ("" : : : "memory");
   read_a = a;

   /* read_b == 1 implies read_a == 1. */

   if (read_b == 1 && read_a == 0)
       abort();
}

static void
slow_path(void)
{
   a = 1;
   membarrier(MEMBARRIER_CMD_SHARED, 0);
   b = 1;
}

Here the slow_path is doing two writes (a, then b) separated by a barrier, and the fast_path is doing two reads (b, then a) also separated by a barrier.

The x86 memory model, however, doesn't permit load-load or store-store reordering! So as far as I can tell, membarrier() isn't needed at all in this scenarios and also the mfence wasn't needed in the original code. It seems that simple compiler barriers would have sufficed in both places2.

An example that actually makes sense, IMO, should have a store followed by a load, separated by a barrier in the fast path.

Am I missing something?


1 A compiler barrier prevents movement of loads or stores across it by the compiler (and depending on the implementation may force some register values to memory), but doesn't emit any type of atomic operation or memory fence, so avoid the often order-of-magnitude slowdown inherent in those instructions.

2 Of course on weaker platforms, where load-load reordering can occur, the example might make sense, but the example is explicitly x86 and membarrier() is only implemented on x86.

2 Answers 2

6

You are correct. On x86, this particular use of membarrier() is completely useless. In fact, this exact example is the very first one given in the Intel SDM to illustrate x86 memory ordering rules:

Intel SDM Vol. 3 §8.2.3.2 Neither Loads Nor Stores Are Reordered with Like Operations enter image description here

1
  • 1
    @BeeOnRope Actually, not only are the memory barriers and fences useless in this situation on x86, but your use of volatile makes even compiler barriers unnecessary (because compilers may not reorder volatile accesses w.r.t. each other across sequence points). Aug 31, 2017 at 19:32
5

I'm submitting a fix to this manpage to use a Dekker example instead. See https://lkml.org/lkml/2017/9/18/779

By the way, the membarrier system call is not x86-specific, but rather implement on most Linux architectures now.

Thanks for the feedback!

Mathieu

2
  • 2
    Thanks for taking the time to fix this!
    – BeeOnRope
    Sep 18, 2017 at 19:03
  • why enter syscall not a memorybarrier ? cpu can reorder user-space instruction after enter syscall ? which cause user-space instruction executed in kernel space
    – Chinaxing
    Jun 10, 2021 at 9:32

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