67

How can I check if a variable is empty in Javascript? Sorry for the stupid question, but I'm a newbie in Javascript!

if(response.photo) is empty {
    do something
else {
    do something else
}

response.photo was from JSON, and it could be empty sometimes, empty data cells! I want to check if it's empty.

  • 1
    What does "empty" mean here? If you're not sure, show us some code. – thejh Jan 4 '11 at 20:08
  • Do you mean if it is uninitialized yet? – Franz Payer Jan 4 '11 at 20:09
  • Do you mean whether it evaluates to false? – Felix Kling Jan 4 '11 at 20:09
  • 1
    Do you mean if it is the empty string? – Mark Byers Jan 4 '11 at 20:10
  • Here is a JavaScript implementation of PHPs empty() function, in a more readable way. stackoverflow.com/a/33319704/3779853 – Blauhirn Jun 26 '17 at 17:54

16 Answers 16

104

If you're testing for an empty string:

if(myVar === ''){ // do stuff };

If you're checking for a variable that has been declared, but not defined:

if(myVar === null){ // do stuff };

If you're checking for a variable that may not be defined:

if(myVar === undefined){ // do stuff };

If you're checking both i.e, either variable is null or undefined:

if(myVar == null){ // do stuff };
  • if an empty data cell from the database, deos that mean undefined!!! – Jhon Woodwrick Jan 4 '11 at 20:12
  • 3
    Don't use the undefined "constant", as it's not a constant at all. Use typeof myVar === 'undefined' instead. – Guffa Jan 4 '11 at 20:15
  • 3
    Nope. If a variable has been declared but not defined it is not null... it is undefined. If you check for a variable that has not been declared, you'll get a runtime error. Also, var undefined = 1; will break your third example. Always use typeof and check for "undefined". – gilly3 Jan 4 '11 at 20:20
  • @Jhon Woodwrick: That would be the first case, empty string. – thejh Jan 4 '11 at 20:29
  • 2
    if(typeof variable === "undefined") – ncubica Oct 18 '14 at 2:56
45

This is a bigger question than you think. Variables can empty in a lot of ways. Kinda depends on what you need to know.

// quick and dirty will be true for '', null, undefined, 0, NaN and false.
if (!x) 

// test for null OR undefined
if (x == null)  

// test for undefined OR null 
if (x == undefined) 

// test for undefined
if (x === undefined) 
// or safer test for undefined since the variable undefined can be set causing tests against it to fail.
if (typeof x == 'undefined') 

// test for empty string
if (x === '') 

// if you know its an array
if (x.length == 0)  
// or
if (!x.length)

// BONUS test for empty object
var empty = true, fld;
for (fld in x) {
  empty = false;
  break;
}
  • 3
    +1. Should be typeof x === "undefined", though. – Tomalak Jan 5 '11 at 7:23
  • @Tomalak Oops, thanks. I think the triple equals is optional though. Type of will return a string, nothing will be coerced. – Hemlock Jan 5 '11 at 12:10
  • That's true. Anyway the identity check does not hurt, I guess. :-) – Tomalak Jan 5 '11 at 13:14
  • 1
    (!x) will also be true for NaN and []. (x == null) is a test for null or undefined. – Patrick Fisher Sep 24 '11 at 23:48
  • 1
    Right, I forgot about NaN. I didn't realize that the test for null worked the same as the test for undefined. !x is not true for an empty array though. – Hemlock Sep 25 '11 at 0:34
10

This should cover all cases:

function empty( val ) {

    // test results
    //---------------
    // []        true, empty array
    // {}        true, empty object
    // null      true
    // undefined true
    // ""        true, empty string
    // ''        true, empty string
    // 0         false, number
    // true      false, boolean
    // false     false, boolean
    // Date      false
    // function  false

        if (val === undefined)
        return true;

    if (typeof (val) == 'function' || typeof (val) == 'number' || typeof (val) == 'boolean' || Object.prototype.toString.call(val) === '[object Date]')
        return false;

    if (val == null || val.length === 0)        // null or 0 length array
        return true;

    if (typeof (val) == "object") {
        // empty object

        var r = true;

        for (var f in val)
            r = false;

        return r;
    }

    return false;
}
4

I see potential shortcomings in many solutions posted above, so I decided to compile my own.
Note: it uses Array.prototype.some, check your browser support.

Solution below considers variable empty if one of the following is true:

  1. JS thinks that variable is equal to false, which already covers many things like 0, "", [], and even [""] and [0]
  2. Value is null or it's type is 'undefined'
  3. It is an empty Object
  4. It is an Object/Array consisting only of values that are empty themselves (i.e. broken down to primitives each part of it equals false). Checks drill recursively into Object/Array structure. E.g.

    isEmpty({"": 0}) // true
    isEmpty({"": 1}) // false
    isEmpty([{}, {}])  // true
    isEmpty(["", 0, {0: false}]) //true
    

Function code:

/**
 * Checks if value is empty. Deep-checks arrays and objects
 * Note: isEmpty([]) == true, isEmpty({}) == true, isEmpty([{0:false},"",0]) == true, isEmpty({0:1}) == false
 * @param value
 * @returns {boolean}
 */
function isEmpty(value){
  var isEmptyObject = function(a) {
    if (typeof a.length === 'undefined') { // it's an Object, not an Array
      var hasNonempty = Object.keys(a).some(function nonEmpty(element){
        return !isEmpty(a[element]);
      });
      return hasNonempty ? false : isEmptyObject(Object.keys(a));
    }

    return !a.some(function nonEmpty(element) { // check if array is really not empty as JS thinks
      return !isEmpty(element); // at least one element should be non-empty
    });
  };
  return (
    value == false
    || typeof value === 'undefined'
    || value == null
    || (typeof value === 'object' && isEmptyObject(value))
  );
}
  • Nice. You could point out the differences and how it meets the shortcomings that you identified as well. – Shawn Mehan Sep 22 '15 at 22:50
  • 1
    I would need to iterate through all decisions here. Ok. As compared to @victorkohl and @kapa functions mine can go deeper than first level and report complex objects that look non-empty but really consist of only empty-like values. Example: [{},0,""]. All other solutions here are merely two-liners that don't go the distance and an underscore function that works for Objects and requires the lib. – Oleksii Chekulaiev Sep 22 '15 at 23:40
3

See http://underscorejs.org/#isEmpty

isEmpty_.isEmpty(object) Returns true if an enumerable object contains no values (no enumerable own-properties). For strings and array-like objects _.isEmpty checks if the length property is 0.

1

What about doing like this.

JSON.stringify({}) === "{}"

1

Combining answers from @inkednm into one function:

   function isEmpty(property) {
      return (property === null || property === "" || typeof property === "undefined");
   }
0

It depends on what you mean by "empty". The most common pattern is to check to see if the variable is undefined. Many people also do a null check, for example:
if (myVariable === undefined || myVariable === null)...

or, in a shorter form:
if (myVariable || myVariable === null)...

  • Don't use the undefined "constant", as it's not a constant at all. Use typeof myVar === 'undefined' instead. – Guffa Jan 4 '11 at 20:17
  • These two forms are not the same at all. – kapa Jan 4 '11 at 20:17
  • True, there is an undefined type, but to quote the standard: A Reference is a resolved name binding. A Reference consists of three components, the base value, the referenced name and the Boolean valued strict reference flag. The base value is either undefined, an Object, a Boolean, a String, a Number, or an environment record (10.2.1). A base value of undefined indicates that the reference could not be resolved to a binding. – Bobby D Jan 4 '11 at 20:56
0
if (myVar == undefined)

will work to see if the var is declared but not initalized.

  • 1
    This is dangerous since undefined can be redefined in code (i.e. undefined = true is valid). – Tomalak Jan 4 '11 at 20:15
  • Don't use the undefined "constant", as it's not a constant at all. Use typeof myVar === 'undefined' instead. – Guffa Jan 4 '11 at 20:17
0

Check for undefined:

if (typeof response.photo == "undefined")
{
    // do something
}

This would do the equivelant of vb's IsEmpty. If myvar contains any value, even null, empty string, or 0, it is not "empty".

To check if a variable or property exists, eg it's been declared, though it may be not have been defined, you can use the in operator.

if ("photo" in response)
{
    // do something
}
0

If you're looking for the equivalent of PHP's empty function, check this out:

function empty(mixed_var) {
  //   example 1: empty(null);
  //   returns 1: true
  //   example 2: empty(undefined);
  //   returns 2: true
  //   example 3: empty([]);
  //   returns 3: true
  //   example 4: empty({});
  //   returns 4: true
  //   example 5: empty({'aFunc' : function () { alert('humpty'); } });
  //   returns 5: false

  var undef, key, i, len;
  var emptyValues = [undef, null, false, 0, '', '0'];

  for (i = 0, len = emptyValues.length; i < len; i++) {
    if (mixed_var === emptyValues[i]) {
      return true;
    }
  }

  if (typeof mixed_var === 'object') {
    for (key in mixed_var) {
      // TODO: should we check for own properties only?
      //if (mixed_var.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      return false;
      //}
    }
    return true;
  }

  return false;
}

http://phpjs.org/functions/empty:392

0

what am I missing if empty array... keyless object... falseness const isEmpty = o => Array.isArray(o) && !o.join('').length || typeof o === 'object' && !Object.keys(o).length || !(+value);

0

just put the variable inside the if condition, if variable has any value it will return true else false.

if (response.photo){ // if you are checking for string use this if(response.photo == "") condition
 alert("Has Value");
}
else
{
 alert("No Value");
};
  • This assumes 'empty' means null... but it's not clear from the Asker's question that this is what they meant. It's probably better to clarify that first, before offering an answer, or at least state it as an assumption in your answer. – Mir Oct 25 '17 at 20:40
0

Here's a simpler(short) solution to check for empty variables. This function checks if a variable is empty. The variable provided may contain mixed values (null, undefined, array, object, string, integer, function).

function empty(mixed_var) {
 if (!mixed_var || mixed_var == '0') {
  return true;
 }
 if (typeof mixed_var == 'object') {
  for (var k in mixed_var) {
   return false;
  }
  return true;
 }
 return false;
}

//   example 1: empty(null);
//   returns 1: true

//   example 2: empty(undefined);
//   returns 2: true

//   example 3: empty([]);
//   returns 3: true

//   example 4: empty({});
//   returns 4: true

//   example 5: empty(0);
//   returns 5: true

//   example 6: empty('0');
//   returns 6: true

//   example 7: empty(function(){});
//   returns 7: false
  • Weird... I haven't seen this solution posted online yet but the use of the "!" should take care of checking most values – J Carrillo Jan 9 at 4:23
0

const isEmpty = val => val == null || !(Object.keys(val) || val).length;

  • 1
    Please follow: stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer – Rotemya Mar 8 at 19:26
  • I don't understand, the user asked how to check for empty in javascript, so I assume user knows javascript, no need to explain my answer if the syntax is known? – ismael oliva Mar 9 at 20:08
  • Adding a few more words of description will be better (: Maybe other people want also to understand. – Rotemya Mar 9 at 20:28
0

Here my simplest solution.

Inspired by PHP empty function

function empty(n){
	return !(!!n ? typeof n === 'object' ? Array.isArray(n) ? !!n.length : !!Object.keys(n).length : true : false);
}

//with number
console.log(empty(0));        //true
console.log(empty(10));       //false

//with object
console.log(empty({}));       //true
console.log(empty({a:'a'}));  //false

//with array
console.log(empty([]));       //true
console.log(empty([1,2]));    //false

//with string
console.log(empty(''));       //true
console.log(empty('a'));      //false

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