2

I have some data stored in SQL Server which contains dates (date datatype). I am currently using a BETWEEN clause to filter my records in dates range, something like this ...

SELECT 
    * 
FROM 
    Report
WHERE 
    ReportDate BETWEEN '2016-08-01' AND '2017-08-01'

Is it possible to use BETWEEN and LIKE clause at the same time or something close to that so that whenever a user doesn't specify any dates he/she would be able to pull all the reports? So far the query below

SELECT 
    * 
FROM 
    Report
WHERE 
    ReportDate BETWEEN '' AND ''

doesn't show any records at all. Is there a way of doing this ..?

  • Will the user always present both or n parameters, or could they only submit one? – scsimon Sep 1 '17 at 16:16
  • They can either filter records by using dates or pull all records by not specifying dates – Inno Sep 1 '17 at 19:34
7

Use NULL with a parameter... if no value is given for @startDate and @endDate then the default will be NULL for these parameters, and the second WHERE condition would be met, returning all records.

create proc myProc(@startDate datetime = null, @endDate datetime = null)
as

    SELECT * FROM Report
    WHERE 
    (ReportDate BETWEEN @startDate AND @endDate)
    or
    (@startDate is null and @endDate is null)

Also, if your field is a DATETIME then this blog by Aaron is well worth your read.

Also, this method means the user has to enter both or neither of the parameters. If that's not what you'd want just let us know.

  • Slightly off topic... But the use of optional parameters (... OR @Parameter IS NULL) Will cause the optimizer to choose a scan, even when parameters are supplied and a suitable index exists. Adding OPTION(RECOMPILE) to the query, allows the optimizer to plug in the parameter values before creating the plan, allowing it to do a seek. Here's a good article by Gail Shaw: red-gate.com/simple-talk/sql/t-sql-programming/… – Jason A. Long Sep 1 '17 at 3:49
  • 1
    That's very true and a good way to avoid parameter sniffing but I usually don't introduce that subject so early. – scsimon Sep 1 '17 at 11:40
  • Yea, that's why I prefaced it with, "slightly off topic"... It's just one of those things that jumps out. Good call on adding the Aaron Bertrand article regarding the use of BETWEEN with dates BTW. – Jason A. Long Sep 1 '17 at 14:41
  • 1
    @JasonA.Long Side note, I tested your tbf for tally and like it a lot... since you can use a an anchor and start. i added it to my tool box, thanks. – scsimon Sep 1 '17 at 14:42
  • Very nice. I'm glad you like it and can use it. The "Ben-Gan" style tally tables really are completely different animals, than the loop/cursor or recursive cte varieties, when it comes to performance. – Jason A. Long Sep 1 '17 at 14:56
0

I think the correct logic would be:

SELECT r.*
FROM Report r
WHERE (ReportDate >= @startDate OR @startDate IS NULL) AND
      (ReportDate <= @endDate OR @endDate IS NULL);

This works when only one of the values is NULL.

Note:

I would go with Aaron Bertrand's advice and really use:

SELECT r.*
FROM Report r
WHERE (ReportDate >= @startDate OR @startDate IS NULL) AND
      (ReportDate < DATEADD(day, 1, @endDate) OR @endDate IS NULL);

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