2

I have a simple DbContext, MyDbContext, with 2 DbSets:

public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
public DbSet<Privilege> Privileges { get; set; }

When I ran add-migration in PM console, migrations were generated successfully. I then added code to seed the Privileges table. The code I added is in Startup.Configure():

using (var serviceScope = app.ApplicationServices.GetRequiredService<IServiceScopeFactory>().CreateScope())
{
    serviceScope.ServiceProvider.GetService<OneSourceDbContext>().Database.Migrate();
    serviceScope.ServiceProvider.GetService<OneSourceDbContext>().EnsureSeedData();
}

EnsureSeedData is an extension method that looks like this:

public static void EnsureSeedData(this OneSourceDbContext context)
{
    if (!context.Database.GetPendingMigrations().Any())
    {
        if (!context.Privileges.Any())
        {
                context.Privileges.Add(new Models.Privilege { Name = "Add/Edit" });
                context.SaveChanges();
            }
        }
    }

After adding this code, I deleted all migrations and tried generating again but this time it was saying that Privileges is invalid object. Also, an empty DB was generated even though I have not run the project yet and haven't called update-database. If I comment out EnsureSeedData in Configure() method, migrations get generated.

I thought the 2 lines Database.Migrate() and EnsureSeedData() would only get called when I run the project but it seems that this check inside EnsureSeedData()

!context.Privileges.Any()

is causing migrations to fail. Does add migration really call Configure() in Startup? Its confusing because I only want to create the migration files, why does it run (or seem to run) EnsureSeedData()?

4

Startup.Configure() should only contain code to configure the request pipeline. Any app startup/initialization code should go in Program.Main().

3
  • Ok, but my question is why does it get called when I run add-migration? Does all code in Startup.Configure() get ran when you call add-migration command? – g_b Sep 2 '17 at 0:57
  • 2
    If Program.BuildWebHost() is present, the EF Core Tools will call it to access the application service provider. Yes, this (unfortunately) will call Startup.Configure() as a side effect. The The workaround is to remove it and use IDesignTimeDbContextFactory. – bricelam Sep 5 '17 at 15:05
  • With the new versions you can even have an async Main, and implement it like this. – Shimmy Weitzhandler Apr 12 '20 at 4:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.