31

I have a helper function for using fetch with CouchDB which ends as:

...
return fetch(...)
  .then(resp => resp.ok ? resp.json() : Promise.reject(resp))
  .then(json => json.error ? Promise.reject(json) : json)

and when I use it elsewhere, I was under the impression that I could .catch those explicit rejections:

  above_function(its_options)
    .then(do_something)
    .catch(err => do_something_with_the_json_error_rejection_or_resp_not_ok_rejection_or_the_above(err))

but alas, I can't seem to be able to get a hold of the rejections. The specific error I'm after is a HTTP 401 response.

What gives?

(Please note that there are implicit ES6 return's in the .thens)

0

4 Answers 4

55

    function test() {
      return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        return reject('rejected')
      })
    }

    test().then(function() {
      //here when you resolve
    })
    .catch(function(rej) {
      //here when you reject the promise
      console.log(rej);
    });

1
  • 1
    So I guess it makes my question a xy question, I hate when that happens.
    – morbusg
    Sep 1, 2017 at 19:06
6

Make sure every call to a then() returns a value.

For e.g.

var url = 'https://www.google.co.in';
var options = {};
var resolves = Promise.resolve();

resolves.then(() => {
  console.log('Resolved first promise');
  var fetchPromise = fetch(url, options);
  fetchPromise.then(() => {
    console.log('Completed fetch');
  });
})
.catch(error => {
  console.log('Error', error);
});

Notice the console shows an uncaught exception. However, if you returned the inner promise (or any other value, which ends up turning into a promise via resolve), you end up flattening the promise so exception bubble up.

var url = 'https://www.google.co.in';
var options = {};
var resolves = Promise.resolve();

resolves.then(() => {
  console.log('Resolved first promise');
  var fetchPromise = fetch(url, options);
  return fetchPromise.then(() => {
    console.log('Completed fetch');
  });
})
.catch(error => {
  console.log('Error', error);
});

Notice the exception bubbles up to the outer promise. Hope this clears up things a little bit.

2
  • Please note the "Please note" at the end of the question. Thanks :)
    – morbusg
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:34
  • Yes, but that's the case when you use expressions that do no require curly braces in your arrow functions. I was not 100% sure that was the case everywhere in your code. :)
    – Rahul
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:37
5

Why not wrap it in a try / catch block

// define a failing promise
const test = ()=> new Promise((resolve, reject) => reject('rejected'));

// using an immediately executing function to call an async block
(async ()=> {
  try {
    await test(); // => this will throw an error
  } catch (er) {
    console.log(er); // 'rejected'
  }
})();

0

Promise rejections fall to the second param of the then function.

function test() {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    return reject('rejected')
  })
}

test().then(function() {
  //here when you resolve
}, function(rej) {
  //here when you reject the promise
    console.log(rej)
})
4
  • 2
    The catch() method returns a Promise and deals with rejected cases only. It behaves the same as calling Promise.prototype.then(undefined, onRejected) (in fact, calling obj.catch(onRejected) internally calls obj.then(undefined, onRejected)).
    – ivo
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:27
  • 1
    I've read a lot of documents claiming everyone should avoid that style since it can't catch the "left" side, and use the .catch instead.
    – morbusg
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:27
  • @ivo, put some example together.I haven't been able to do that and have it work. Maybe I screw somewhere
    – yBrodsky
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:34
  • @yBrodsky posted.
    – ivo
    Sep 1, 2017 at 18:42

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