44

I had the following error in package manager console when Add-Migration

Value cannot be null. Parameter name: connectionString

This is my startup:

namespace MyProject
{
    public class Startup
    {
        public IConfiguration Configuration { get; set; }
        public Startup(IConfiguration config)
        {
            Configuration = config;
        }

        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddDbContextPool<AppDbContext>(options =>
                             options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection")));
            services.AddTransient<IDevRepo, DevRepo>();
            services.AddMvc();
            services.AddMemoryCache();
            services.AddSession();
        }

        public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
        {
            if (env.IsDevelopment())
            {
                app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
            }
            app.UseStatusCodePages();
            app.UseStaticFiles();
            app.UseMvcWithDefaultRoute();
            app.Run(async (context) =>
            {
                await context.Response.WriteAsync(Configuration["Message"]);
            });
        }
    }
}

program class:

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BuildWebHost(args).Run();
    }

    public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .ConfigureAppConfiguration((context, builder) => builder.SetBasePath(context.HostingEnvironment.ContentRootPath)
                       .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
                       .Build())

            .UseStartup<Startup>()
            .Build();
}

appsettings.json:

{
  "Message": "Hello World",
  "ConnectionStrings": {
    "DefaultConnection": "Server=(localdb)\\MSSQLLocalDB;Database=NotMyFault;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true"
  }
}

Interestingly if I run the app, it displays "Hello World", but when add migration it cannot find connectionString. Can someone please shed some lights here? Thanks.

2
  • What are the constructors of AppDbContext looking like? See docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/miscellaneous/… . You should not use parameterless constructors and use the default one with DbContextOptions.
    – user4344677
    Sep 7, 2017 at 10:39
  • @zuckerthoben thanks, and that is what I use. 'public AppDbContext(DbContextOptions<AppDbContext> options) : base(options) { }"
    – Bing Han
    Sep 7, 2017 at 21:18

24 Answers 24

43

This problem occurred when the connection string can't be found.

Probably you have the following code in Startup class:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddDbContext<BenchmarkContext>(options =>
            options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("yourConnectionString name from appsettings.json")));
    }

These methods solve your problem:

1- Instead of Configuration.GetConnectionString("yourConnectionString name from appsettings.json") just put your connectionstring.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddDbContext<BenchmarkContext>(options =>
  options.UseSqlServer("Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=Benchmark;Persist Security Info=True;User ID=****;Password=****"));
    }

2- If you are going to use the Configuration file add these codes to Startup class:

public Startup(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        Configuration = configuration;
    }
public IConfiguration Configuration;

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddDbContext<BenchmarkContext>(options =>
            options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("TestConnection")));
    }

Appsetting.json file:

{
  "ConnectionStrings": {
    "TestConnection": "Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=Benchmark;Persist Security Info=True;User ID=****;Password=****"
  }
}

After that execute 'add-migration name' command in Package Manager Console

3
  • 4
    I had written "ConnectionString" instead of "ConnectionStrings" and the last "s" was my fault
    – Reza Bayat
    Nov 29, 2019 at 22:40
  • @RezaBayat same:D
    – ITm
    Feb 13, 2020 at 20:23
  • 2
    I added to Appsettings.Development.json file instead of Appsettings.json file. Hence it was not working.
    – Bimal Das
    Mar 11, 2021 at 8:29
15

I had the same issue, but my solution was a lot simpler. All I did was to change the order of the appsettings.json from:

{
  "Message": "Hello World",
  "ConnectionStrings": {
    "DefaultConnection": "Server=(localdb)\\MSSQLLocalDB;Database=NotMyFault;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true"
  }
}

to:

{
   "ConnectionStrings": {
    "DefaultConnection": "Server=(localdb)\\MSSQLLocalDB;Database=NotMyFault;Trusted_Connection=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=true"
  },
  "Message": "Hello World"
}

I have a suspicion that there is a sequence/order of parameters in the appsettings.json file.

4
  • This was exactly the problem I had. Apparently it wants ConnectionStrings at the top. Is this documented somewhere? Oct 16, 2018 at 20:59
  • Same thing! Got this issue when load testing the service. Thanks for solution. Has anyone reported this bug to Microsoft? Oct 25, 2018 at 9:18
  • Same thing here. Had to put the connection strings up at the top of the json file and it started working. Thanks!
    – ksilcox
    Sep 9, 2019 at 19:42
  • I just had this same problem in VS 2019, EF Core, .NET 5. This should really be addressed. I am not sure I would have figured it out without this answer.
    – Daniel
    Feb 15, 2021 at 15:17
7

I had such issue when load tesing the service (I recommend it to all) and had ~3/1000 requests with errors, so I changed

services.AddDbContextPool<AppDbContext>(options =>
options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection")));

to

string connectionString = Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection");
services.AddDbContextPool<AppDbContext>(options =>
options.UseSqlServer(connectionString));

So it reads connections string 1 time and doesn't use Configuration on every request. And now 100% requests are successful. But it seems to be a bug in .Net Core

0
5

I found my own problem.

I have an AppDbContextFactory class which inherits IDesignTimeDbContextFactory. Deleting this class resolves this issue.

2
  • There is another solution instead of deleting the context factory completely. Add the following default constructor to the class: ``` public DesignTimePrioritizedListDbContextFactory() { IConfigurationRoot configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder() .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory()) .AddEnvironmentVariables() .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", false, true) .Build(); _connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString(Startup.SqlConnectionSettingName); } ``` Jun 6, 2019 at 17:42
  • yes, not delete it, but fix it. the missing connection string is exactly from here.
    – Dongdong
    May 3, 2021 at 16:19
4

I had the same problem, because I was using the default value in Startup.cs. I just edited Configuration property from:

public IConfiguration Configuration { get; }

to:

public IConfiguration Configuration;

and it worked! If someone say why would be appreciated.

2
  • This worked for me, still learning .net core 2.0, the guide I was following says to make that a set method, and I think it should be provided by the dependency injection, but if you make it a property that can be set, it works
    – mahlatse
    Feb 14, 2019 at 20:10
  • Default ASP.Net Core scaffolding generates the property without the setter. Needs to add it, but it isn't enough for me to fix the OP issue I have as well.
    – Christophe
    Jan 27, 2020 at 9:17
4

I had had a similar issue because of the following reasons:

  • appsettings.json was not included in the project
  • I was running the project from the path which did not contain appsettings.json
1
  • In my case, I misspelled something in appsettings.json, but your answer helped me find the problem.
    – redcurry
    Oct 5, 2018 at 17:15
4

I had the same error and resolved it by moving "ConnectionStrings" to be the first variable in the appsettings.json file.

0
3

Probably, the issue is with your DotNetCliToolReference from the csproj file. If you migrate the project from an older version of asp.net core, the DotNetCliToolReference is not automatically updated. Update the yourproject.csproj file to use the 2.0.0 version of the CLI as shown in the snippet bellow:

<ItemGroup>

        ...
          <DotNetCliToolReference 
               Include="Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Tools.DotNet" 
               Version="2.0.0" />
</ItemGroup>

Rerun, from the project folder, the dotnet command with -v switch to see results

dotnet ef database update -v

Also, recheck your Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore nuget packages to reference the 2.0.0 version. Remove or update older EF packages. The minimum are:

  • Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.SqlServer

  • Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Design

both 2.0.0 at this moment.

1
  • That doesn't seem to help
    – Bing Han
    Sep 9, 2017 at 0:14
3

I had the same problem and what it is the I had to make sure that the name of the connection matches:

      services.AddMvc().SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_1);
        services.AddDbContext<MyContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(Configuration["ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection"]));

which ****ConnectionStrings:DefaultConnection*** it was where I had the whole problem. Make sure that is the same in Startup.cs and appsettings.json(appsettings.Development.json in Vs 2019)

After I fixed this, everything was fine.

1
  • For me, the problem was I had the connection string defined in the appsettings.development.json file, but it was missing at the top of appsettings.json.
    – Christophe
    Jan 27, 2020 at 9:24
3

I had a similar issue. I had a typo in my appsettings.json. Changing ConnectionsStrings to ConnectionStrings did it for me!

2

I have solved my issue by setting right base path. The problem is the migrations or anything else from different packages uses wrong path to the appsetting.json file. Not sure if it's an official issue.

I have just changed my Startup.cs as follows:

public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false, reloadOnChange: true)
            .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
            .AddEnvironmentVariables();
        Configuration = builder.Build();
    }

After that you just need to copy your appsettings.json to the right place if it's missing there.

2

This worked flawlessly for me:

public IConfiguration Configuration;
public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddDbContext<ApplicationDbContext.ApplicationDbContext>(options => 
            //options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection")));
            options.UseSqlServer("Server=serverAddress; Database=dbName; user=username; password=pswd"));
}

The commented part is just as reference where to replace.

2

Another scenario can be where you set the configuration. set the connection string in appsettings.json instead of appsettings.Development.json

1
  • This isn't really an answer. The different appsettings files are for different configurations. So if you want it for your Development environment you need to set your Environment variable for ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT to equal Development and ensure that your app has the ConfigurationBuilder set up to get the correct values.
    – Luke
    Feb 2 at 22:07
2

I had a similar problem when I specified the ".UseContentRoot" as the current process path.

public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseUrls("http://*:3001")
            .UseStartup<Startup>()
            .UseContentRoot(Path.GetDirectoryName(Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName));

thus when running Add-Migration the process path is different from the project bin path therefore the process can't find the appsettings.json file. when I removed the ".UseContentRoot" line the migration was successful

2

I'm stupid and I had typo

{
  "Conn'ce'tionStrings": {
    "DefaultConnection": "Data source=datingapp.db"
  },

changed it to

{
  "ConnectionStrings": {
    "DefaultConnection": "Data source=datingapp.db"
  },
1

I had a similar problem after trying to use new created project for ASP.NET Core 2.0 Web Api. As far as I found, the cause of the problem was that application settings specified for development environment were not added. I fixed it by updating startup file to the following:

public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
        .SetBasePath(env.ContentRootPath)
        .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false, reloadOnChange: true)
        .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true)
        .AddEnvironmentVariables();
    this.Configuration = builder.Build();
}

In my case program class looks like the following:

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        BuildWebHost(args).Run();
    }

    public static IWebHost BuildWebHost(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .UseStartup<Startup>()
            .Build();
}
3
  • Hi, thanks but that doesn't seem to help either. I am sure that in core 2.0 you can move appsettings build to the program.class, and the startup constructor just need to take the configuration injection. – Bing Han 7 hours ago
    – Bing Han
    Sep 9, 2017 at 7:25
  • @BingHan Yes, you can do this. But this is the source of the problem. Your application settings are added only when BuildWebHost is instantiated. Most of the tools don't need to run your application to perform their actions. Instead, they can create fake host or something similar to this using your startup file. And in this case, IConfiguration is simply resolved to the instance with empty configuration. Sep 9, 2017 at 13:21
  • I found the problem, appreciate your help !
    – Bing Han
    Sep 10, 2017 at 22:28
0

My problem was when I was trying to run App.dll within netcoreapp2.1 folder, but the right folder is netcoreapp2.1\publish\

0

If you have previously renamed your connection string in appsettings file and you have omitted to rename it in DesignTimeDbContextFactory class (if you have it in your project) and that is checked by Entity framework, then you may run in this issue.

0

If you are using an IDesignTimeDbContextFactory, you will need to add a default constructor to it with no parameters. Try something like this:

public DbContextFactory()
{
    IConfigurationRoot configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
        .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
        .AddEnvironmentVariables()
        .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", false, true)
        .Build();

    _connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString("ConnectionStringName");
}
0

For me it was that I had appSettings.json instead of appsettings.json for some reason (not quite sure if VS did that with a newly created project or I had renamed it to that). Once I changed the name, it worked fine.

0

I figured I would add what it was for me. I had followed a popular tutorial to add appsettings.json and dependency injection to a console application. I did not realize in the setup that it referenced the current directory and was using that to set the base path of the configuration builder. It worked fine when I was running locally, but as soon as I tried to deploy and have a SQL scheduled job run the command it was taking the directory where the command was being entered, not where the DLL was so it wasn't finding my appsettings.json file. I simply removed the lines that dealt with getting the current directory and setting that as the base path and it works fine. It seems like it defaults to the same folder as the DLL.

0

I had this problem due to a difference in connectionstring of appsetting.json file, and the GetConnectionString(connectionstrings) parameter in startup.cs. Once I removed extra s in startup.cs, the problem disappeared.

0

Check if ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT variable is set up on the server correctly. Depending on that environment it may be taking appsettings.json instead of appsettings.Staging.json or appsettings.Production.json.

0

In my case i was using configuration["DbContext"]

 services.AddDbContext<AstroBhaskarDbContext>(option =>
 {
     option.UseSqlServer(configuration["DbContext"]);
 });

then i replaced configuration["DbContext"] to configuration.GetConnectionString("DbContext") as below

  services.AddDbContext<AstroBhaskarDbContext>(option =>
  {
     option.UseSqlServer(configuration.GetConnectionString("DbContext"));
  });

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