2

I frequently find myself writing code like this to get nicely formatted multi-column output (without the index) when debugging or studying my data in pandas:

   dfs = dfs[dfs['some_id'] == the_id]
    cols = [
      'some_col',
      'another_col',
      'yet_another',
    ]

    print("\t".join(cols))
    for row in dfs[cols].values:
      print("\t\t".join([str(val) for val in row]))

This works fine, but I was wondering if there's a built in way to get this sort of output with a pandas function or direct lookup syntax. Sample output:

some_col    another_col    yet_another
a           b              c
x           y              z
2

Yes, you can call df.to_string with the parameter index=False.

dfs = dfs[dfs['some_id'] == the_id]
    cols = [
      'some_col',
      'another_col',
      'yet_another',
    ]

print(dfs[cols].to_string(index=False))

MCVE:

print(df)

          0         1
0  0.335232 -1.256177
1 -1.367855  0.746646
2  0.027753 -1.176076
3  0.230930 -0.679613
4  1.261967  0.570967

print(df.to_string(index=False, col_space=10))

0          1
 0.335232  -1.256177
-1.367855   0.746646
 0.027753  -1.176076
 0.230930  -0.679613
 1.261967   0.570967
2
  • I usually use that to see all or a single column. How can I use that to select a subset of the total columns?
    – J B
    Sep 3 '17 at 0:07
  • 1
    @JB Added the edit for your particular code at the top.
    – cs95
    Sep 3 '17 at 0:08

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.