I'm a Python 3 learner and recently I was confused by a strange behavior of time.time().

I wrote two pieces of code and timed them with time.time():

pow version

from time import time

t0 = time()
x = pow(2, 1000000000)
t1 = time()
print(t1 - t0)

powimage


** version

from time import time

t0 = time()
x = 2 ** 1000000000
t1 = time()
print(t1 - t0)

**image


pow: time_cost = 1.544sec, output = 1.43625617027

**: time_cost = 1.526sec, output = 0.0

Why time.time() doesn't work for ** version???


More Info:

sys.version='3.6.2 (v3.6.2:5fd33b5, Jul 8 2017, 04:14:34) [MSC v.1900 32 bit (Intel)]',

sys.winver='3.6-32',

sys.platform='win32',

sys.implementation=namespace(cache_tag='cpython-36', hexversion=50725616, name='cpython', version=sys.version_info(major=3, minor=6, micro=2, releaselevel='final', serial=0))

  • Could you try it again? Not able to reproduce it. Perhaps there's a typo and you're subtracting the same variables. Plus you've included the wrong code in ** version. – Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 3 '17 at 3:03
  • If you want to measure the performance of code, please use the timeit module instead. – coldspeed Sep 3 '17 at 3:08
  • @AshwiniChaudhary image I've tried it again and still time.time() didn't work for ** – JieJiSS Sep 3 '17 at 3:31
  • @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ timeit image It seems that timeit() also failed to time **. However, when I tried to time pow with timeit(), something strange happened: image. timeit() spent 35.79secs running pow(2, 10000)! Now i'm more confused... – JieJiSS Sep 3 '17 at 3:40
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It has to do with the way Python 3 processes certain constant expressions while processing a file. If you run the program:

print("start")
x = 2**1000000000
print("end")

you will see that there is a long start-up delay, and then "start" and "end" are printed almost simultaneously. While the program:

print("start")
x = pow(2, 1000000000)
print("end")

prints "start", then pauses for a while, and prints "end".

Python "pre-computes" the expression 2**1000000000 while it's initially processing the file (at the byte compilation stage), before the program actually starts running. In contrast, the expression pow(2,1000000000) isn't precomputed; it's byte compiled as a function call and computed when the program actually runs.

Here's another way to see this is happening. If you create two module files:

# starstar.py
x = 2**1000000000

# pow.py
x = pow(2,1000000000)

and import them into another program:

# main.py
import starstar
import pow

and run python main.py, then Python will produce byte compiled versions of the modules (maybe in a subdirectory called __pycache__ or something). You'll see that the byte-compiled version of the starstar.pyc module is huge -- it actually contains a copy of the pre-computed value of 2**1000000000; but the pow.pyc file will be tiny.

  • thank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu! So nice! – JieJiSS Sep 3 '17 at 3:42

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