2

I was testing some currying-in function and I could get this to work pretty easily:

test = (a) => { return (b) => a+b } // test(5)(6) => 11

I couldn't get to work the same function when using the ES6 destructing argument:

test = ({a}) => { return (b) => a+b } // test(5)(6) => NaN 

Is there a way to have it work? Why doesn't the second test function work?

  • Destructuring doesn't make sense when you want to handle a single argument. – Aaron Sep 4 '17 at 9:23
  • Little off topic: You can also write test = (a) => (b) => a + b – Magus Sep 4 '17 at 9:23
  • Or if you want to use destructuring, test = ([a,b]) => a+b, called as test([4,5]) (Magus is using currying) – Aaron Sep 4 '17 at 9:25
8

If you use a destructuring argument, you have to call your function with an object :

test = ({a}) => { return (b) => a+b }
console.log(test({a : 5})(6)); // => 11
  • Thanks that was a big distraction on my side! – Francesco Meli Sep 4 '17 at 9:24

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