I'm trying to understand what the issue is with creating an efficient prime factorisation algorithm. Specifically, the research I've done so far says that no algorithm has yet been discovered which can find the prime factors of a number in O(n2) time. However, the obvious algorithm to me is something like (pseudocode)

method(int number, ArrayList<int> listOfPrimes)
{
    int x = 0;
    for (int i : listOfPrimes)
     {
      for (int j : listOfPrimes)
       { 
         if (i * j = number)
          {
            x = i*j;
          }
        }
      }
     return x;
 }

I think method is O(n2), where n is the size of the list. Clearly my understanding of this issue is flawed or there wouldn't be such a fuss about prime factorisation. Where am I going wrong?

  • 1
    yep thats O(n^2). – Daniel A. White Sep 4 '17 at 12:02
  • 1
    how are you generating listOfPrimes ? – marvel308 Sep 4 '17 at 12:03
  • you might want to ask this on Mathematics as it does not directly relate to programming. – Daniel A. White Sep 4 '17 at 12:03
  • @DanielA.White my apologies, I thought as my question related primarily to the time complexity of a particular algorithm this would be the right place for it – Jonnie Marbles Sep 4 '17 at 12:06
  • 3
    Often in number theory the n in O(n) (or whatever) is the number of digits of the numbers, not the numbers themselves. You might want to check the refetrences to see what they mean by O(n). – dmuir Sep 4 '17 at 12:48

As alluded to by @dmuir, your "n" is not the correct "n". Otherwise a trivial O(n) algorithm to factor would be:

factor(n){
   for (int i=2; i<n; i++) {
      if (n % i == 0) {
         print("found factor:", i);
         return i;
      }
   }
}

For factoring, the size of the input is measured in digits, so "n" is the number of digits or bits in the number. The best algorithms have a very complicated complexity that requires some number theory to understand, but is "greater than" polynomial time yet "less than" exponential time, where the quoted phrases can be made formal. For this reason the complexity is sometimes referred to as "subexponential".

A more optimal way would be

method(int number, ArrayList<int> listOfPrimes)
{
    int x = 0;
    for (int i : listOfPrimes)
    {
        while(number%i == 0){
            number /= i;
            x++;
        }

    }
    return x;
 }

this returns the count prime factors of a number. the complexity would be

O(n + number_of_prime_factors)

where n is the length of listOfPrimes

  • So, have I misunderstood what polynomial time is? Or is there some other factor that makes prime factorisation hard? – Jonnie Marbles Sep 4 '17 at 12:14
  • This is supposing that listOfPrimes is generated, generating that would be the main headache – marvel308 Sep 4 '17 at 12:16
  • Also the complexity would be much less since the inner while loop would run only the number of prime factors times – marvel308 Sep 4 '17 at 12:17
  • So, just so that I'm clear: the difficult part is generating a list of primes? I thought you could check whether a number is prime in polynomial time, so wouldn't generating this list be trivial? – Jonnie Marbles Sep 4 '17 at 12:53
  • depends on how large the number is but yes that can be done in polynomial time – marvel308 Sep 4 '17 at 12:55

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