In Scala, case Class looks like this:

val alice   = Person("Alice",   25, Address("1 Scala Lane", "Chicago", "USA"))
val bob     = Person("Bob",     29, Address("2 Java Ave.",  "Miami",   "USA"))
val charlie = Person("Charlie", 32, Address("3 Python Ct.", "Boston",  "USA"))

for (person <- Seq(alice, bob, charlie)) {
    person match {
        case Person("Alice", 25, Address(_, "Chicago", _) => println("Hi Alice!")
        case Person("Bob",   29, Address("2 Java Ave.", "Miami", "USA")) => println("Hi Bob!")
        case Person(name,   age, _) => println(s"Who are you, $age year-old person named $name?")
    }

I wanted to implement this in Perl 6, but failed:

class Address {
    has Str $.street;
    has Str $.city;
    has Str $.country;
}

class Person {
    has Str $.name;
    has Int $.age;
    has $.address;
}

my $alice   = Person.new(:name("Alice"),   :age(25), :address(Address.new(:street("1 Scala Lane"), :city("Chicago"), :country("USA"))));
my $bob     = Person.new(:name("Bob"),     :age(29), :address(Address.new(:street("2 Java Ave."), :city("Miami"), :country("USA"))));
my $charlie = Person.new(:name("Charlie"), :age(32), :address(Address.new(:street("3 Python Ct."), :city("Boston"), :country("USA"))));

for ($alice, $bob, $charlie) -> $s {
  given $s {
    # when Person { say $alice }; # works!
    when Person.new(:name("Alice"),   :age(25), :address(Address.new(:street("1 Scala Lane"), :city("Chicago"), :country("USA")))) {
      say "Hi Alice!"; # doesn't work
    }
    when Person.new(:name("Bob"),     :age(29), :address(Address.new(:street("2 Java Ave."), :city("Miami"), :country("USA")))) {
       say "Hi Bob!" # doesn't work
    }
    when Person.new(:name("Charlie"), :age(32), :address(Address.new(:street("3 Python Ct."), :city("Boston"), :country("USA")))) {
      say "Who are you, $age year-old person named $name?"; # doesn't work
    }
  }
}

It seems like that pattern match in Scala in more powerfull. But I wonder if Rakudo Perl 6 can achieve this?

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try using * eqv in your when statements to check if the structures of two objects are identical.

class Address {
    has Str $.street;
    has Str $.city;
    has Str $.country;
}

class Person {
    has Str $.name;
    has Int $.age;
    has $.address;
}

my $alice   = Person.new(:name("Alice"), :age(25), :address(Address.new(:street("1 Scala Lane"), :city("Chicago"), :country("USA"))));
my $bob     = Person.new(:name("Bob"), :age(29), :address(Address.new(:street("2 Java Ave."), :city("Miami"), :country("USA"))));
my $charlie = Person.new(:name("Charlie"), :age(32), :address(Address.new(:street("3 Python Ct."), :city("Boston"), :country("USA"))));

for ($alice, $bob, $charlie) {
    when * eqv Person.new(:name("Alice"),:age(25), :address(Address.new(:street("1 Scala Lane"), :city("Chicago"), :country("USA")))) {
        say "Hi Alice!";
    }

    when * eqv Person.new(:name("Bob"), :age(29), :address(Address.new(:street("2 Java Ave."), :city("Miami"), :country("USA")))) {
       say "Hi Bob!";
    }
    when Person {
       say "Who are you, {.age} year-old person named {.name}?";
    }
}

Additional notes:

In this code, the for loop without a signature is automatically setting the topic (i.e. $_), so a given block isn't needed.

The {.age} inside the last when block is accessing the .age method of $_ and interpolating it into the string.

Also, since objects smart match to themselves, you get the exact same results using the following for loop:

for ($alice, $bob, $charlie) {
    when $alice { say "Hi Alice!"                                          }
    when $bob   { say "Hi Bob!"                                            }
    when Person { say "Who are you, {.age} year-old person named {.name}?" }
}
  • Awesome! one more question, why not use $_ eqv instead of * eqv? As far as I konw, the asterisk in term context is WhateverCode, right? – chenyf Sep 6 '17 at 1:42
  • You are correct. $_ eqv works as well. As I understand it, * eqv Person.new(...) creates a block like {$_ eqv Person.new(...)} (which would also work if you explicitly typed it up). Personally, * eqv just seems more natural to me. – Christopher Bottoms Sep 6 '17 at 13:26
  • 1
    To take it a step further, if (and $_) makes more sense than when in this case, since you're fully specifying all the variables. The when statement isn't acting like a lambda, except because you used * instead of $_. – piojo Sep 7 '17 at 7:06

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