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I've been learning assembly using the "Professional Assembly Language" book by Richard Blum and have gotten through all of it by writing assembly on MacOS, except of course a few of the "using files" exercises. Specifically, having trouble with appending a file. I can write to file, no problem, but not sure if have the correct "access mode values" for appending the file. According to the usr/include/sys/fcntl.h file MacOS likes using 0x0008 for appending files. The PAL book uses $02002(octal). (I suppose I could try doing this with library functions instead, but apparently those are just wrappers for the 'int' system calls, and just trying to understand how this all works).

Thanks for any help, and sorry if this is a dumb question or a did something really dumb. cheers.

Here's my code:

.data
filename:
.asciz "cpuid.txt"
output:
.asciz "The processor Vendor ID is 'xxxxxxxxxxxx'\n"

.bss
.lcomm filehandle, 4

.text
.globl _main
_main:
movl $0, %eax

# Get the CPUID and place the CPUID values (stored in ebx, edx and ecx) accordingly within,
# the correct address space, after the 'output' address.
cpuid
movl $output, %edi
movl %ebx, 28(%edi)
movl %edx, 32(%edi)
movl %ecx, 36(%edi)


# OPEN/CREATE A FILE:
movl $5, %eax
movl $filename, %ebx
movl $0x0008, %ecx      # Access mode values loaded into ECX        
                        #.... APPEND TEXT FILE, using a $02002(octal) according to PAL textbook
                        # on MacOS, APPEND mode is 0x0008 or $00007(octal)?  according to usr/include/sys/fcntl.h
movl $0644, %edx        # file permission values loaded into EDX

# For MacOS, we need to put all of this on the stack (in reverse order),
# and, add an additional 4-bytes of space on the stack,
# prior to the system call (with 'int')
pushl %edx
pushl %ecx
pushl %ebx
subl  $4, %esp
int   $0x80             # ...make the system call
addl  $16, %esp         # clear the stack


test %eax, %eax         # check the error code returned (stored in EAX) after attempting to open/create the file
js badfile              # if the value was negative (i.e., an error occurred, then jump)
movl %eax, filehandle   # otherwise, move the error code to the 'filehandle'


# WRITE TO FILE:
movl $4, %eax
movl filehandle, %ebx
movl $output, %ecx
movl $42, %edx

# once again, for MacOS, put all of this on the stack,
# and, add an additional 4-bytes of space on the stack
pushl %edx
pushl %ecx
pushl %ebx
subl $4, %esp
int $0x80
addl $16, %esp          # and, again, clear the stack

test %eax, %eax
js badfile



# CLOSE THE FILE:
movl $6, %eax
movl filehandle, %ebx

# okay, move it onto the stack again (only one parameter on stack for closing this time)
pushl %ebx
subl $4, %esp
int $0x80

addl $8, %esp

badfile:
subl $9, %esp
movl %eax, %ebx
movl $1, %eax
int $0x80
6
  • Is this a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/a/9622244/2189500? Sep 4, 2017 at 22:00
  • Putting $02001 in %ecx, when opening the file, does not seem to work. If I use that access mode code and then try to append the file, the file doesn't appear to append in mac osx (MacOS) (despite being able to write to the file above "cpuid.txt" if it was empty).
    – Frank
    Sep 5, 2017 at 4:45
  • If O_APPEND is 0x8 on mac, then I'd expect O_WRONLY | O_APPEND to be 0x9. Sep 5, 2017 at 5:07
  • okay, after converting a C program that uses O_APPEND and checking the values put on the stack, I figured out the append value for Mac OS X (MacOS)... it's $012(octal) or 0x0a.
    – Frank
    Sep 5, 2017 at 5:34
  • Yes, you are correct. 0x9 (O_WRONLY | O_APPEND) also works. The C program I was looking at used O_RDWR|O_APPEND, which would mean 2+8, or 0x0a. So, 0x09 or 0x0a into ECX above (instead of 0x0008) works. Thanks for helping to clear this up.
    – Frank
    Sep 5, 2017 at 5:44

1 Answer 1

1

Below is the corrected assembly language code version (AT&T style) for appending a file on mac os x (MacOS).

Compile your 'myfile.s' assembly file in Mac Terminal using the 'as' and 'ld' commands:

as -m32 -o myfile.o myfile.s

ld -e _main -o myfile myfile.o

.data
filename:
.asciz "cpuid.txt"
output:
.asciz "The processor Vendor ID is 'xxxxxxxxxxxx'\n"

.bss
.lcomm filehandle, 4

.text
.globl _main
_main:
movl $0, %eax

# Get the CPUID and place the CPUID values (stored in ebx, edx and ecx) accordingly within,
# the correct address space, after the 'output' address.
cpuid
movl $output, %edi
movl %ebx, 28(%edi)
movl %edx, 32(%edi)
movl %ecx, 36(%edi)


# OPEN/CREATE A FILE:
movl $5, %eax
movl $filename, %ebx
movl $0x09, %ecx      # Access mode values loaded into ECX        
                      # on Linux, APPEND TEXT FILE using a $02002(octal) according to "Professional Assembly Language" (PAL) textbook
                      # however, on Mac OS X (MacOS), APPEND mode is 0x0008, according to usr/include/sys/fcntl.h
                      # ... so for write (0x01) and append (0x08) access (O_WRONLY | O_APPEND), the value becomes 0x09
                      # (for read/write (0x02) and append (0x08) access (O_RDWR|O_APPEND), the value would be 0x0a)

movl $0644, %edx      # file permission values loaded into EDX

# For MacOS, we need to put all of this on the stack (in reverse order),
# and, add an additional 4-bytes of space on the stack,
# prior to the system call (with 'int')
pushl %edx
pushl %ecx
pushl %ebx
subl  $4, %esp
int   $0x80             # ...make the system call
addl  $16, %esp         # clear the stack


test %eax, %eax         # check the error code returned (stored in EAX) after attempting to open/create the file
js badfile              # if the value was negative (i.e., an error occurred, then jump)
movl %eax, filehandle   # otherwise, move the error code to the 'filehandle'


# WRITE TO FILE:
movl $4, %eax
movl filehandle, %ebx
movl $output, %ecx
movl $42, %edx

# once again, for MacOS, put all of this on the stack,
# and, include an additional 4-bytes of space on the stack,
# (stack grows downward, thus the 'subl' instruction) prior to the 'int' system call
pushl %edx
pushl %ecx
pushl %ebx
subl $4, %esp
int $0x80
addl $16, %esp          # and, again, clear the stack

test %eax, %eax
js badfile



# CLOSE THE FILE:
movl $6, %eax
movl filehandle, %ebx

# okay, move it onto the stack again (only one parameter on stack for closing this time)
pushl %ebx
subl $4, %esp
int $0x80

addl $8, %esp

badfile:
subl $9, %esp
movl %eax, %ebx
movl $1, %eax
int $0x80
3
  • You can #include <asm/unistd.h> to get system call number constants, so you can do something like mov $__NR_write, %eax. And instead of putting args into the registers for the Linux ABI, you should just push directly since you're using the 32-bit FreeBSD system call ABI. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2535989/…. (See also stackoverflow.com/tags/x86/info for more links) Sep 7, 2017 at 20:20
  • Anyway, you can define some symbolic constants with .equ, or use gcc -dM to dump the macro definition from your sys/fcntl.h into a header you can include from asm (that doesn't contain any non-CPP C definitions). Then you can write push $0666 / push $(O_WRONLY|O_APPEND) / push $filename. (Use 0666 for permissions to let umask do its job.) Actually, the mode is never used if your flags don't include O_CREAT, but whatever. Sep 7, 2017 at 20:23
  • Much belated but your help was much appreciated. (Still writing assembly.) Cheers.
    – Frank
    Jun 26, 2023 at 17:36

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