73

Whats the difference between ThreadPool and Pool in multiprocessing module. When I try my code out, this is the main difference I see:

from multiprocessing import Pool
import os, time

print("hi outside of main()")

def hello(x):
    print("inside hello()")
    print("Proccess id: ", os.getpid())
    time.sleep(3)
    return x*x

if __name__ == "__main__":
    p = Pool(5)
    pool_output = p.map(hello, range(3))

    print(pool_output)

I see the following output:

hi outside of main()
hi outside of main()
hi outside of main()
hi outside of main()
hi outside of main()
hi outside of main()
inside hello()
Proccess id:  13268
inside hello()
Proccess id:  11104
inside hello()
Proccess id:  13064
[0, 1, 4]

With "ThreadPool":

from multiprocessing.pool import ThreadPool
import os, time

print("hi outside of main()")

def hello(x):
    print("inside hello()")
    print("Proccess id: ", os.getpid())
    time.sleep(3)
    return x*x

if __name__ == "__main__":
    p = ThreadPool(5)
    pool_output = p.map(hello, range(3))

    print(pool_output)

I see the following output:

hi outside of main()
inside hello()
inside hello()
Proccess id:  15204
Proccess id:  15204
inside hello()
Proccess id:  15204
[0, 1, 4]

My questions are:

  • why is the “outside __main__()” run each time in the Pool?

  • multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool doesn't spawn new processes? It just creates new threads?

  • If so whats the difference between using multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool as opposed to just threading module?

I don't see any official documentation for ThreadPool anywhere, can someone help me out where I can find it?

4
  • As I know, because of GIL in Python, the multithreading of Python looks like the multi-thread but it's not real. If you want to take advantage of your multi-cores with python, you need to use multi-processing. In modern computer, creating a process and creating a thread have almost the same cost. – Yves Sep 5 '17 at 3:53
  • 1
    Creating a thread may have similar cost to creating a process, but communicating between threads has very different cost to communicating between processes (unless perhaps you used shared memory). Also, your comment about the GIL is only partly true: it is released during I/O operations and by some libraries (e.g. numpy) even during CPU-bound operations. Still, the GIL is ultimately the reason for using separate processes in Python. – Arthur Tacca Sep 5 '17 at 7:31
  • @Yves That may be true on *nix, through the use of fork, but it's not true on Windows and fails to take into account the additional overhead, limitations and complexity of communicating between processes as opposed to threads (on all platforms). – Basic Apr 16 '18 at 9:59
  • 2
    To answer the question on threading versus ThreadPool, in threading has no easy direct way to get the return value(s) of the worker functions. Whereas, in ThreadPool you can easily get the return value(s) of the worker functions. – eigenfield Jul 11 '18 at 19:15
92

The multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool behaves the same as the multiprocessing.Pool with the only difference that uses threads instead of processes to run the workers logic.

The reason you see

hi outside of main()

being printed multiple times with the multiprocessing.Pool is due to the fact that the pool will spawn 5 independent processes. Each process will initialize its own Python interpreter and load the module resulting in the top level print being executed again.

Note that this happens only if the spawn process creation method is used (only method available on Windows). If you use the fork one (Unix), you will see the message printed only once as for the threads.

The multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool is not documented as its implementation has never been completed. It lacks tests and documentation. You can see its implementation in the source code.

I believe the next natural question is: when to use a thread based pool and when to use a process based one?

The rule of thumb is:

  • IO bound jobs -> multiprocessing.pool.ThreadPool
  • CPU bound jobs -> multiprocessing.Pool
  • Hybrid jobs -> depends on the workload, I usually prefer the multiprocessing.Pool due to the advantage process isolation brings

On Python 3 you might want to take a look at the concurrent.future.Executor pool implementations.

7
  • Thanks for the answer. I just want to understand this statement: Note that this happens only if the spawn process creation method is used (only method available on Windows). If you use the fork one (Unix), you will see the message printed only once as for the threads. Im assuming, the "spawn" and "fork" are implicit when I call the "map()" or "Pool()"? Or is this something I can control? – ozn Sep 5 '17 at 22:05
  • The explanation is in the link I gave you above when mentioning the spawn start method. You can control it, but the start methods availability depends on the OS platform. I assume you are using Windows as the default start strategy is the spawn one. If so, there's little to do as Windows only support spawn. – noxdafox Sep 6 '17 at 6:59
  • 4
    Is the comment about the unfinished implementation of ThreadPool still valid in 2019 with Python 3.7? – Cedric H. Jan 7 '19 at 10:31
  • Yes it is. As you can see from the linked source and the lack of documentation. – noxdafox Jan 7 '19 at 17:01
  • 2
    @MrR, which is absolutely reasonable and true, but that does not actually address why IO bound jobs should prefer ThreadPool over a Pool (process); although, I would imagine that is answerable simply by common sense regarding the time it takes to fork off an entire subprocess as well as the additional overhead caused by not being able to share the same resources. – Spencer D Oct 27 '19 at 2:23

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