34

I would like to use Cygwin as the integrated terminal on Visual Studio Code on my Windows laptop (as this would give me use of the Linux terminal commands git and G++, etc.) but when I set the value for "terminal.integrated.shell.windows": to the address of the Cygwin application (.exe) then it opens a new Cygwin terminal rather than remaining in VS Code.

So my question is: can I use Cygwin integrated into the VS Code terminal and use that to use commands on it (mkdir, rm, etc.) but also use git commands and use it as an integrated compiler and debugger (for generically but for C++ at least)? And how would I go about this?

  • 1
    Do you have Windows 10 on your computer? If so, you can just use WSL instead of Cygwin. – ifconfig Sep 5 '17 at 22:58
  • Besides, @user2766296 I don't believe VS Code works with Cygwin as a terminal anyway. – ifconfig Sep 6 '17 at 15:55
  • 1
    @ifconfig, it does. I just tried it (see answer below), and it works great. Even shell colors (.dircolors) work. – Steven Volckaert Nov 22 '17 at 7:17
62

These config settings work for me:

{
  // start bash, not the mintty, or you'll get a new window
  "terminal.integrated.shell.windows": "C:\\cygwin\\bin\\bash.exe",
  // Use this to keep bash from doing a 'cd ${HOME}'
  "terminal.integrated.env.windows": {
    "CHERE_INVOKING": "1"
  },
  // Make it a login shell
  "terminal.integrated.shellArgs.windows": [
    "-l"
  ],
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I had to fix some typos for the second parameter: "terminal.integrated.env.windows": { "CHERE_INVOKING": "1" }, – Led Nov 6 '17 at 8:16
  • 2
    Is there a way to add this as an additional shell option, so that you could choose to use either cmd or bash whenever you created a new terminal window? – mfortner Dec 23 '17 at 0:49
  • 4
    You need to add a colon after "terminal.integrated.env.windows" – RashaMatt Feb 20 '18 at 3:03
  • 4
    Also, for a 64-bit Cygwin installation, the path might be "C:\\cygwin64\\bin\\bash.exe" – RashaMatt Feb 20 '18 at 3:04
  • Can this settings be placed in workspace file .code-workspace? That would be very helpfull. – Danijel Dec 5 '18 at 13:08
13

You could just call the Cygwin.bat without ENV issue:

{
    // Replace with your Cygwin.bat file path 
    "terminal.integrated.shell.windows": "C:\\cygwin64\\Cygwin.bat",
}

Make sure the BAT scripts fit to your Cygwin.

| improve this answer | |
  • But then Terminal > Run Active File no longer works how do I fix this @Nick Tsai – Mark Nov 14 '18 at 21:40
  • @Mark, I'm afraid that the integration loses Run Active File feature but only Run Selected Text works. – Nick Tsai Nov 15 '18 at 5:50
9

Combining above answers, this is my working configuration.

{
    "terminal.integrated.shell.windows": "C:\\cygwin\\bin\\bash.exe",
    "terminal.integrated.env.windows": {
        "CHERE_INVOKING": "1"
    },
    "terminal.integrated.shellArgs.windows": [
        "--login",
        "-i"
    ],
}

{tested at ubuntu 18.04lts, running Windows 7 ultimate 32bt in Virtualbox 5.2.12}

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Bash options: -i Force the shell to run interactively. --login Make this shell act as if it had been directly invoked by login. When the shell is interactive, this is equivalent to starting a login shell with ‘exec -l bash’. When the shell is not interactive, the login shell startup files will be executed. ‘exec bash -l’ or ‘exec bash --login’ will replace the current shell with a Bash login shell. – Danijel Dec 10 '18 at 13:08
  • 2
    For 64-bit Cygwin, remember to place Cygwin with cygwin64, but otherwise, this seems to work so far. – Prometheus Aug 27 '19 at 16:50
5

VS Code only allows you to set one default terminal configuration at a time and as its likely that users would want multiple shells to be available at any time like CMD, Powershell and Cygwin Bash, it would be best to use an Visual Studio Code Extension called Shell Launcher.

This tool will allow you to launch any number of shells at any time. First you need to reassign the CTRL-SHIFT-T hotkey to shellLauncher or use a different unused hotkey.

Then, go into your settings.json for VS Code and add the following block:

"shellLauncher.shells.windows": [
  {
    "shell": "C:\\Windows\\System32\\cmd.exe",
    "label": "cmd"
  },
  {
    "shell": "C:\\Windows\\System32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell.exe",
    "label": "PowerShell"
  },
  {
    "shell": "C:\\cygwin\\bin\\bash.exe",
    "args": ["-l"],
    "env": {"CHERE_INVOKING": "1"},
    "label": "Cygwin Bash"
  }
],

Note: alter paths above as required

Now when you hit the hotkey you assigned, you will get a dropdown of the available terminals configured.

| improve this answer | |

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