Why does binmode as raw produce the umlaut? Could any elaboration be given regarding how 'Zurich' String is stored internally in Perl? Just a little lost.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $filename = "result-test-encoding-raw.xml";
open(my $fh,'>', $filename) or die "die";
#binmode $fh, ':utf8'; #bad umlaut
binmode $fh, ':raw'; #good umlaut

print $fh '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>';
print $fh '<node>';

my $line_text =  'Zürich';
print $fh $line_text;
print $fh '   next   ';
$line_text = 'Z&#252;rich';
print $fh $line_text;

print $fh '</node>';

close($fh);
  • 1
    Re "how 'Zurich' String is stored internally in Perl", The internal storage format is no consequence here. – ikegami Sep 5 '17 at 21:43
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're missing use utf8;, which tells Perl your source code is encoded using UTF-8.


By default, source files are expected to be encoded using US-ASCII.

  • If you encoded your source file using UTF-8, but you didn't tell this to Perl (by using use utf8;), Perl will treat it as encoded using US-ASCII. For string literals, Perl will simply map the bytes to string characters (rather than rejecting non-ASCII chars). This means that $line_text contains 5A.C3.BC.72.69.63.68.

    When you pass these characters to a file handle with an encoding layer, the encoding layer will treat those characters as Unicode Code Points (Zürich) and produce the appropriate bytes to represent those characters.

  • If you encoded your source file using UTF-8, and if you told this to Perl (by using use utf8;), Perl will treat it as encoded using UTF-8 (decoding it accordingly). This means that $line_text contains 5A.FC.72.69.63.68.

    When you pass these characters to a file handle with an encoding layer, the encoding layer will treat those characters as Unicode Code Points (Zürich) and produce the appropriate bytes to represent those characters.


use strict;
use warnings;
use utf8;                             # Source code is encoded using UTF-8.
use open ':std', ':encoding(UTF-8)';  # Terminal expects UTF-8. Default encoding for files.

my $filename = "result-test-encoding-raw.xml";

open(my $fh, '>', $filename)
   or die("Can't create \"$filename\": $!\n");

...    
print $fh 'Zürich';
...

Note that I the use of :encoding(UTF-8) instead :utf8. The later is incorrect even though both appear equivalent in this example.

  • Isn't the default Perl source encoding Latin-1 rather than (7-bit) ASCII? At least perldoc perlunifaq claims so. – amon Sep 5 '17 at 21:44
  • @amon, Not the way I see it. Try perl -MEncode -e'print encode("iso-latin-1", "sub f\xEAte { }\n")' | perl. In contrast, perl -MEncode -e'print encode("UTF-8", "use utf8; sub f\xEAte { }\n")' | perl works fine. – ikegami Sep 5 '17 at 21:46
  • Very clear example! Thank you. – amon Sep 5 '17 at 21:58
  • 1
    @amon, And when it comes to literals, it's neither ASCII nor latin-1 (perl -e'print qq{printf "%vX\\n", "\x80";}' | perl gives 80 even though 80 doesn't exist in either). It simply maps the bytes directly into characters. What happens is effectively closer to iso-latin-1 than US-ASCII, though. – ikegami Sep 5 '17 at 21:59

Strings in Perl can be stored either as Byte Strings or Unicode Character strings. In your case, you are defining Byte Strings.

Question: In which encoding is your program source saved?

Your 1st assignment to $line_text is a byte string in your program source's encoding. When you print this byte string to the file using :raw, it is dumped exactly as it was stored in your source. If you print an encoded byte string using an encoder,like :utf8 you get a doubly encoded string which is unlikely a good idea. If your program is saved in UTF8, then you can use utf8; to decode that string literal into a Character string. When you print a properly decoded Character string using :utf8, it will encode the characters correctly into UTF8.

Moral of the story: While passing raw bytes can work in some situations, it's generally a better idea to decode your inputs (and string literals) and encode your outputs.

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