125

Using the css-in-js method to add classes to a react component, how do I add multiple components?

Here is the classes variable:

const styles = theme => ({
  container: {
    display: 'flex',
    flexWrap: 'wrap'
  },
  spacious: {
    padding: 10
  },
});

Here is how I used it:

return (<div className={ this.props.classes.container }>)

The above works, but is there a way to add both classes, without using the classNames npm package? Something like:

<div className={ this.props.classes.container + this.props.classes.spacious}>
3
  • 3
    Maybe I'm missing something, but can't you just do <div className="container spacious"> Why do you need to pass it as a property? – Leo Farmer Sep 6 '17 at 4:17
  • 2
    you're just missing a space between the two classNames. – Shanimal May 15 '18 at 1:16
  • Yeah as stated above, you just need to concat the classes together correctly with a space in between! No need for any additional packages. – Taylor A. Leach Jan 8 '19 at 22:45

13 Answers 13

245

you can use string interpolation:

<div className={`${this.props.classes.container} ${this.props.classes.spacious}`}>
4
  • 11
    and remember not to add commas in between classes! I did by mistake and the first one broke silently without noticing for a while – Pere Nov 27 '19 at 12:04
  • 1
    And there must be a space between the classes – Yoel Nov 5 '20 at 18:35
  • 2
    This is the first time I've encountered a scenario where string interpolation is actually more tedious to write than doing it the old fashioned way: className={classes.container+' '+classes.spacious} – TJBlackman Feb 1 at 4:28
  • 1
    @TJBlackman indeed, your version is more readable – Michael Lossagk Apr 2 at 2:45
65

You could use clsx. I noticed it used in the MUI buttons examples

First install it:

npm install --save clsx

Then import it in your component file:

import clsx from 'clsx';

Then use the imported function in your component:

<div className={ clsx(classes.container, classes.spacious)}>

3
  • 6
    clsx package is smaller than classnames, so I prefer this solution – Hoang Trinh Apr 6 '20 at 10:33
  • 4
    clsx is included in Material UI, so its more preferred than classnames – DBrown Apr 29 '20 at 23:52
  • 2
    Per Wayne Bloss' comment below Mini's less-optimal answer: @material-ui/core now depends on clsx, so if you don't want to increase your bundle size you'll want to use that instead. So, +1 for this answer. – cssyphus Aug 6 '20 at 16:52
50

you can install this package

https://github.com/JedWatson/classnames

and then use it like this

classNames('foo', 'bar'); // => 'foo bar'
classNames('foo', { bar: true }); // => 'foo bar'
classNames({ 'foo-bar': true }); // => 'foo-bar'
classNames({ 'foo-bar': false }); // => ''
classNames({ foo: true }, { bar: true }); // => 'foo bar'
classNames({ foo: true, bar: true }); // => 'foo bar'

// lots of arguments of various types
classNames('foo', { bar: true, duck: false }, 'baz', { quux: true }); // => 'foo bar baz quux'

// other falsy values are just ignored
classNames(null, false, 'bar', undefined, 0, 1, { baz: null }, ''); // => 'bar 1'
4
  • 3
    This is the approach Material-UI uses in some of their examples, and works well so I'd recommend this. – Craig Myles Sep 5 '18 at 7:28
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer. Works as expected – Howie Dec 27 '18 at 17:19
  • 2
    Been using this approach as well. Useful not just for having multiple classnames but also for making it conditional. – mouthzipper Feb 4 '19 at 10:32
  • 6
    @material-ui/core now depends on clsx, so if you don't want to increase your bundle size you'll want to use that instead - npmjs.com/package/clsx – Wayne Bloss Oct 4 '19 at 16:21
22

To have multiple classes applied to a component, wrap the classes you would like to apply within classNames.

For example, in your situation, your code should look like this,

import classNames from 'classnames';

const styles = theme => ({
  container: {
    display: "flex",
    flexWrap: "wrap"
  },
  spacious: {
    padding: 10
  }
});

<div className={classNames(classes.container, classes.spacious)} />

Make sure that you import classNames!!!

Have a look at material ui documentation where they use multiple classes in one component to create a customized button

10

You can also use the extend property (the jss-extend plugin is enabled by default):

const styles = theme => ({
  container: {
    display: 'flex',
    flexWrap: 'wrap'
  },
  spaciousContainer: {
    extend: 'container',
    padding: 10
  },
});

// ...
<div className={ this.props.classes.spaciousContainer }>
1
  • 2
    Unfortunately, not enabled by default anymore... vote to enable here – egerardus Apr 25 '19 at 2:53
8

I think this will solve your problem:

const styles = theme => ({
 container: {
  display: 'flex',
  flexWrap: 'wrap'
},
 spacious: {
  padding: 10
},
});

and in react component:

<div className={`${classes.container} ${classes.spacious}`}>
6

Yes, jss-composes provides you this:

const styles = theme => ({
 container: {
  display: 'flex',
  flexWrap: 'wrap'
},
 spacious: {
  composes: '$container',
  padding: 10
},
});

And then you just use classes.spacious.

1
4

You can add multiple string classes and variable classes or props classes at same time in this way

className={`${classes.myClass}  ${this.props.classes.myClass2} MyStringClass`}

three classes at same time

3

classNames package can also be used as advanced as:

import classNames from 'classnames';

var arr = ['b', { c: true, d: false }];
classNames('a', arr); // => 'a b c'

let buttonType = 'primary';
classNames({ [`btn-${buttonType}`]: true }); // => 'btn-primary'
1
  • show error webpack build : Module not found: Error: Can't resolve 'classnames' in – Pranay Soni Apr 28 '20 at 23:55
1

You can use this method below:

import clsx from 'clsx';
    
return <div className={clsx(classes.container, 'spacious')} />

This link helps.

0

It can be done painlessly with descructuring, after all, these are JavaScript objects:

const truncate = {
  width: '100px',
  whiteSpace: 'nowrap',
  overflow: 'hidden',
  textOverflow: 'ellipsis',
};
email: {
    color: '#747474',
    ...truncate,
  },
-1

If you want to assign multiple class names to your element, you can use arrays.

So in your code above, if this.props.classes resolves to something like ['container', 'spacious'], i.e. if

this.props.classes = ['container', 'spacious'];

you can simply assign it to div as

<div className = { this.props.classes.join(' ') }></div>

and result will be

<div class='container spacious'></div>
2
  • are you sure classes named separated by , in result – Pardeep Jain Sep 6 '17 at 5:29
  • 8
    Not sure why this is the accepted answer, @Glauber Ramos is right, Material UI doesn't work like that. – timotgl Nov 16 '18 at 11:05
-1

As already mentioned, you can use string interpolation

className={`${this.props.classes.container}  ${this.props.classes.spacious}`}

And you can try classnames library, https://www.npmjs.com/package/classnames

1
  • 2
    Both parts of your answer were provided earlier by other members. All you did was to repeat them in a single answer. -1 (Suggest you delete this answer and recover your 2pts) – cssyphus Aug 6 '20 at 16:55

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