2

I'm currently using the simple model below. It's pretty straightforward: we have resources and they can be Room, EmptyOffice (...) or Service.

Room and EmptyOffice can have a capacity, but NOT Service.

public abstract class Resource : Entity
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Room : Resource
{
    public int Capacity { get; set; }
}

public class EmptyOffice : Resource
{
    public int Capacity { get; set; }
}

public class Service : Resource
{ }

To get the data from my SQL view, I use the mappings:

builder.Entity<Resource>(m =>
{
    m.ToTable("resource", "facility");
    m.HasKey(x => x.Id);
    m.Property(x => x.Id)
        .HasColumnName("ResourceId");
    m.Property(x => x.Type)
        .HasColumnName("ResourceTypeId");

    m.HasDiscriminator(x => x.Type)
        .HasValue<Room>(ResourceType.Room)
        .HasValue<EmptyOffice>(ResourceType.EmptyOffice)
        .HasValue<Service>(ResourceType.Service);
});

builder.Entity<Room>();
builder.Entity<EmptyOffice>();
builder.Entity<Service>();

When I run my code, EF Core throws the following exception:

System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: 'Invalid column name 'Room_Capacity'.'

If I rename the Capacity property to Room_Capacity, it works but it's horrible.

How can I force EF Core 2.0 to target the capacity property for each of my child entities?

Thank you Sebastien

  • Did you create your database using EF Core 2.0 migrations? – Smit Sep 12 '17 at 0:23
  • Nope. I'm using an existing DB. – Seb Sep 12 '17 at 6:03
  • Can you share details of your table structure in database. The issue here is, EF creates certain database structure which is not matching with your existing db. If you share database model, we can find missing pieces. – Smit Sep 12 '17 at 23:21
1

You can't do that as the only inheritance pattern available in EF Core is table per class hierarchy. If you go with interfaces instead of base classes, you can, but each entity will be mapped to a different table. Mark any property you want to exclude with [NotMapped], or, using the code, with Ignore.

| improve this answer | |
  • Actually I want to map the capacity properties of Room/EmptyOffice to the capacity column return by my view. If i try to do that with the code above, I get the exception about the Room_capacity. My guess is that Entity Framework concats the entity type + property name to differentiate Room.Capacity from EmptyOffice.Capacity. I'm not sure why it needs to do... – Seb Sep 6 '17 at 9:57
  • You can't do that as the only inheritance pattern available in EF Core is table per class hierarchy. If you go with interfaces instead of base classes, you can, but each entity will be mapped to a different table. My bad, sorry! – Ricardo Peres Sep 6 '17 at 9:59
  • I see so i need to use a backing field and mark the capacity property as NonMapped. Yes it makes sense ;) – Seb Sep 6 '17 at 10:10
  • Thanks! I updated my answer according to my comment. – Ricardo Peres Sep 6 '17 at 10:11
3

This worked for me:

builder.Entity<Room>().Property(a => a.Capacity).HasColumnName("Capacity");

builder.Entity<EmptyRoom>().Property(a => a.Capacity).HasColumnName("Capacity");
| improve this answer | |
1

I did in project next code to make it more generic way.

        private static void FindAndConfigureBackgroundJobResultTypes(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            var backgroundJobResultTypes = typeof(BackgroundJobResult).Assembly.GetTypes().Where(x => x.IsSubclassOf(typeof(BackgroundJobResult))).ToList();

            var sameTypeAndNameProperties = backgroundJobResultTypes
                .SelectMany(x => x.GetProperties())
                .GroupBy(d => new {d.Name, d.PropertyType})
                .Select(grp => new
                {
                    PropertyType = grp.Key.PropertyType,
                    PropertyName = grp.Key.Name,
                    Count = grp.Count()
                })
                .Where(x => x.Count > 1).ToList();


            foreach (var backgroundJobResultType in backgroundJobResultTypes)
            {

                //Set base type , instead of exposing this type by DbSet
                modelBuilder.Entity(backgroundJobResultType).HasBaseType(typeof(BackgroundJobResult));

                //Map properties with the same name and type into one column, EF Core by default will create separate column for each type, and make it really strange way. 
                foreach (var propertyInfo in backgroundJobResultType.GetProperties())
                {
                    if (sameTypeAndNameProperties.Any(x => x.PropertyType == propertyInfo.PropertyType && x.PropertyName == propertyInfo.Name))
                    {
                        modelBuilder.Entity(backgroundJobResultType).Property(propertyInfo.PropertyType, propertyInfo.Name).HasColumnName(propertyInfo.Name);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
| improve this answer | |

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