0

I know that you can use || for OR and && for AND, and ! essentially means NOT, but what about the other logic gates, such as NOR, XOR, etc.?

  • 4
    There is a build in operator for xor – Aleks Andreev Sep 6 '17 at 17:09
  • 1
    !(a || b)- NOR, !(a && b)- NAND , a ^ b - xor – sTrenat Sep 6 '17 at 17:13
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    That's like asking how, given the set of arithmetic operators, you divide the result of an addition. Easy: Figure out what you want to do and write code that does that. – Ed Plunkett Sep 6 '17 at 17:20
  • Also, for non-numeric comparisons, the xor is just != – sTrenat Sep 6 '17 at 17:26
5

Simply build the more complicated logic expressions from the ones you have.

NOR would be (!x && !y)

XOR would be (x && !y) || (!x && y)

As @AleksAndreev points out there is also an XOR operator ^

2

The only logical infix operators in C# are:

  • | logical OR (this operator always evaluates both operands)
  • || conditional OR (If the first operand is true, then C# does not evaluate the second operand)
  • & logical AND (this operator always evaluates both operands)
  • && conditional AND (If the first operand is false, then C# does not evaluate the second operand)
  • ^ XOR

The 'not' operator is a prefix operator:

  • ! NOT

To perform logical operations that are similar to other logic gates you would have to use a combination of logical operators, e.g.:

  • !(A && B) NAND
  • !(A || B) NOR
  • !(A ^ B) XNOR
1

For XOR you can use the ^ symbol

// Logical exclusive-OR
// When one operand is true and the other is false, exclusive-OR 
// returns True.
Console.WriteLine(true ^ false);
// When both operands are false, exclusive-OR returns False.
Console.WriteLine(false ^ false);
// When both operands are true, exclusive-OR returns False.
Console.WriteLine(true ^ true);

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/operators/xor-operator

For NOR you can use a combination of ! and ||

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