13

I would like to group few bash instructions after a condition:

First attempt:

$ [[ 0 == 1 ]] && echo 1; echo 2
2

Second attempt:

$ [[ 0 == 1 ]] && (echo 1; echo 2)
$ [[ 0 == 0 ]] && (echo 1; echo 2)
1
2

So the latter is what I want.

Question: This is the 1st time I'm using (...) syntax in bash. Is (...) the right way to go, or does it have some side effects I might be missing?

3
  • 7
    Use { command1; command2; command3; } which is a compound command rather than a sub-process. Note final semi-colon. Sep 7, 2017 at 9:41
  • 1
    and the leading space (or other character of IFS)
    – Aaron
    Sep 7, 2017 at 9:41
  • 1
    You are probably better off using a proper if statement. if [[ 0 == 1 ]]; then echo 1; echo 2; fi.
    – chepner
    Sep 7, 2017 at 13:29

1 Answer 1

12

Placing commands in () creates a subshell in which the grouped commands are executed. That means that any changes to variables made in subshell, stay in subshell, for example

$ n=5; [[ "$n" == "5" ]] && ( ((n++)); echo $n); echo $n
6
5

Instead you want to group with {} which doesn't invoke a subshell. Then the output would be

$ n=5; [[ "$n" == "5" ]] && { ((n++)); echo $n; }; echo $n
6
6

Also mind the spaces on the inside of {} and semicolons: { ((n++)); echo $n; };.

4
  • They can do the first example though and it clearly would work
    – 123
    Sep 7, 2017 at 9:43
  • Hm, indeed... :D
    – campovski
    Sep 7, 2017 at 9:46
  • A good argument against subshells as default grouping method is that variable modification inside subshells are local to that subshell, i.e. n=0; ( ((n++)); echo $n); echo $n will print 1 (inside subshell) then 0 (outside subshell)`
    – Aaron
    Sep 7, 2017 at 9:46
  • That was the example I was trying to do but manager disturbed while I was typing and forgot what I wanted to do...
    – campovski
    Sep 7, 2017 at 9:47

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