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I have been working on my C assignment where I try to replicate strlen() function without actually using it. This is the code I have been trying to get working. However, somehow the main function does not reflect what's happenning in mystrlen() function. Can you please tell me why it does not work as the strlen() function?

#include <stdio.h>

int mystrlen(char *input_string) {
/* This function returns the length of the input string */
/* WRITE FUNCTION CODE HERE! */
    char str1[50];
    int abcd = 0;
    scanf("%s", str1);
    int m;
    for(m=0; str1[m]; m++){
        abcd ++;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int length;
    if (argc!=2) {
        printf("Usage: strlen <input_string_with_no_space_inside_it>\n\n");
    return 1;
    }
    length = mystrlen(argv[1]);
    printf("The length is: %d characters.\n",length);
    return 0;
}
  • 4
    the function always return 0 (return 0;) – BLUEPIXY Sep 7 '17 at 9:49
  • 2
    Do this: int mystrlen(const char *data) { int counter = 0; while (*data++) { counter++; } return counter; } – Asesh Sep 7 '17 at 9:49
  • 4
    Your solution doesn't replicate at all the strlen function. – Jabberwocky Sep 7 '17 at 9:50
  • 4
    You never use input_string! – CinCout Sep 7 '17 at 9:50
  • 2
    @OrhanGaziYalçın nobody is asking you to change input_string. – Jabberwocky Sep 7 '17 at 9:52
1

This:

return 0;

should be:

return abcd;

That said, abcd is a terrible name for this variable, and the function makes little sense as a strlen() replacement. It doesn't touch its argument, and calls scanf() to read input from the user, which you really don't want a strlen() replacement to do.

Here's one way of writing it:

size_t mystrlen(const char *s)
{
  size_t len = 0;
  if(s != NULL)
  {
    while(*s != '\0')
    {
      ++len;
      ++s;
    }
  }
  return len;
}

Improvements include:

  • Proper size_t-typed return value (lengths are sizes, and cannot be negative) so size_t is proper and what the real strlen() uses.
  • Doesn't do any input-reading.
  • Uses the input argument.
  • Computes length and returns it.

It also handles being given NULL, as a bonus.

A matching main() that does what yours did could be:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  if (argc != 2)
  {
    printf("Usage: strlen <input_string_with_no_space_inside_it>\n\n");
    return 1;
  }
  const size_t length = mystrlen(argv[1]);
  printf("The length is: %zu characters.\n", length);
  return 0;
}

This basically centers around the int-to-size_t change. Also note that in shells supporting quoting, you can run your program like this:

$ ./strlen "hello this is a string with spaces in it"

and it will pass that entire quoted string (sans quotes, of course) in argv[1].

  • 1
    @nicomp Okay, can you bit a more specific about what problem you're seeing? The code in main() looks sane so I didn't replicate it. – unwind Sep 7 '17 at 9:59
  • there's plenty of insanity in the main(). – nicomp Sep 7 '17 at 10:02
  • 1
    @nicomp could you be more specific? Apart from poor formatting the main function looks perfectly ok for me. – Jabberwocky Sep 7 '17 at 10:05
  • @MichaelWalz See the answer posted below by another user: "First of all, you try to pass a string, and then you invoke scanf function in mystrlen. Delete this scanf. Secondly, your function always returns zero instead of value of variable abcd." – nicomp Sep 7 '17 at 11:46
  • @nicomp the comments of this answer should be only about this answer and not about other answers. I still don't understand your comment : "there's plenty of insanity in the main()." – Jabberwocky Sep 7 '17 at 11:48
0

First of all, you try to pass a string, and then you invoke scanf function in mystrlen. Delete this scanf. Secondly, your function always returns zero instead of value of variable abcd.

  • 3
    This is rather a comment than an answer, why don't you elaborate a bit more? – Jabberwocky Sep 7 '17 at 9:59
  • 2
    While this might be a valuable hint to solve the problem, a good answer also demonstrates the solution. Please edit to provide example code to show what you mean. Alternatively, consider writing this as a comment instead. – Toby Speight Sep 7 '17 at 11:40

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