I found an "interesting" question about list.

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list1.insert(3, list1)
print(list1)
[1, 2, 3, [...]]
POP = list1.pop()
print(POP)
[1, 2, 3]
list1.extend(['a', 'b', 'c'])
print(POP)
[1, 2, 3, 'a', 'b', 'c']

Those are shown in the interactive mode. Of course, I know "insert" can only insert one object into the list. However when I insert list1 into list1. It shows [...], what does it mean? Moreover, POP = list1.pop(), isn't that pop can only return the final object to you? After extend the list, the final object should be 'c'. Why it returns the whole list1 but without [...]?

marked as duplicate by coldspeed python Sep 7 '17 at 10:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    It doesn't happen in just python3.6... – coldspeed Sep 7 '17 at 10:34
  • 1
    @n33rma In general dupes are okay... but when people start praising the heavens for them, you know something is wrong. – coldspeed Sep 7 '17 at 10:36

When you call list1.insert(3, list1) you are inserting a reference to list1 at index 3, so your list becomes:

[1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [...

You can see this by doing:

>>> list1[3]
[1, 2, 3, [...]]
>>> list1[3][3]
[1, 2, 3, [...]]
>>> list1[3][3][3]
[1, 2, 3, [...]]
>>> list1[3][3][3][3]
[1, 2, 3, [...]]

You have infinitely nested list1 within itself, this is why you see [...] because the list is infinitely long.

When you then call POP = list.pop() you are removing the reference and so list1 becomes [1, 2, 3] again, and POP becomes a reference to list1.

Because POP is a reference to list1 when you call list1.extend(['a', 'b', 'c']) you also update POP as they're both pointing to the same list.


If instead you did:

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
list1.insert(3, list1[:])

You're adding a copy of list1 and so will get:

[1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3]]

And then calling:

POP = list1.pop()

Will make POP a reference to the new list.

At this point doing:

list1.extend(['a', 'b', 'c'])
print(POP)

Will output:

[1, 2, 3]

and:

print(list1)

will output:

[1, 2, 3, 'a', 'b', 'c']

Alternatively, refer to this crude drawing (which is not truly representative):

enter image description here

  • Is that somehow like Russell's Paradox? – Stephen Fong Jun 18 at 12:47
  • @StephenFong No, not even remotely – Nick A Jun 18 at 19:29
  • but Russell's Paradox talks about a set which contain itself and therefore go infinity – Stephen Fong Jun 18 at 23:07
  • @Stephen sure, but these aren't sets and this isn't set theory – Nick A Jun 18 at 23:21

Wrt your first question. You are right that insert can add a single element to the list. However, that element can be anything - another number, a string, a complex object, a list, or even the list itself. Seems like Python is smart enough to figure out that printing list1 would result in an infinite output, since list1 has a cyclic structure like that. So it prints a placeholder which looks liks [...].


Wrt your second question. Since pop returns the last element in the list, but that element is a reference to the list itself you get that reference. It also removes the reference, so it seems to you that you're getting a copy of the original list. Which is true, but the object itself has suffered the addition and removal of its last element, as you would expect.

Basically, Python is reference based for when we assign an object to other its reference is copied. For copying, you need deepcopy or slicing in case of a list. Below is the explanation in comments.

list1 = [1, 2, 3]
#Creating list 1
list1.insert(3, list1)
#Inserting list1 refrence at index 3, means inserting its refernce. It would become [1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [1, 2, 3, [... so on]]]]

print(list1)
[1, 2, 3, [...]]
#in order to avoid this write like list1.insert(3, list1[:])

POP = list1.pop()
#Here pop is removing last index from list and returing modified list too

print(POP)
[1, 2, 3]
list1.extend(['a', 'b', 'c'])
# Here you are extending some other list not its refrence as previous
print(POP)
[1, 2, 3, 'a', 'b', 'c']

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