2

If I create this constant in TypeScript:

const PARAMS = {
  green: {color: 0x007700},
  black: {color: 0x000000},
  white: {color: 0xffffff},
};

it deduces the type as { green: {color: number}; black: { color: number }; white: { color: number }; }.

But I know from context that the type of the values should be THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters. I can declare this using an indexed type:

const PARAMS: {[name: string]: THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters} = {
  green: {color: 0x007700},
  black: {color: 0x000000},
  white: {color: 0xffffff},
};

but then I lose the specific possibilities for keys ("green", "black" or "white"). I can model it more precisely by writing out the full type that I want:

const PARAMS: {
  green: THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters,
  black: THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters,
  white: THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters
} = {
  green: {color: 0x007700},
  black: {color: 0x000000},
  white: {color: 0xffffff},
};

but this is quite verbose and repetitive.

Is there a way to get the the type I want in a more concise way?

4

You can reduce the verbosity by using generic mapped type

type ParamsType<Colors extends string> = {
    [c in Colors]: THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters;
}

const PARAMS: ParamsType<'green' | 'black' | 'white'> = {
  green: {color: 0x007700},
  black: {color: 0x000000},
  white: {color: 0xffffff},
};

But you still have to repeat color names twice. If you want typescript to deduce keys, you have to introduce intermediate function, completely useless at runtime. I don't know of any other way to make typescript to infer generic parameter - there is a proposal on github to allow deduction for default template parameter, but nothing was implemented so far.

function inferColorKeys<Colors extends string>(params: ParamsType<Colors>): ParamsType<Colors> {
    return params;
}


const PARAMS = inferColorKeys({
  green: {color: 0x007700},
  black: {color: 0x000000},
  white: {color: 0xffffff},
});

UPDATE

You can make it completely generic, as @jcalz suggested, by making inferKeys into a function that takes explicit generic parameter and returns a function that infers its generic parameter. It has to be two functions because a function can't have some generic parameters explicit and some inferred. Also, it makes use of built-in Record type which is defined as type Record<K extends string, V> = {[k in K]: V}.

const inferKeys = <V>() => <K extends string>(x: Record<K,V>): Record<K,V> => x;

const PARAMS = inferKeys<THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters>()({
    green: {color: 0x007700},
    black: {color: 0x000000},
    white: {color: 0xffffff},
});

type of PARAMS is inferred as

Record<"green" | "black" | "white", THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters>
  • I like the inferColorKeys trick. Is it possible to make it generic, e.g. to let me write const PARAMS = inferKeys<THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters>({ ... }); and not create the intermediate types? – danvk Sep 7 '17 at 16:55
  • 1
    It's not that easy because a function can't have some generic parameters explicit and some inferred. A way to bypass that is to add yet another intermediate function which takes explicit generic parameter, but when I try that typescript inference reverts to {color: number} instead of THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters for value types. Need to think more. – artem Sep 7 '17 at 17:29
  • 2
    Maybe something like const inferKeys = <V>() => <K extends string>(x: Record<K,V>): Record<K,V> => x;? – jcalz Sep 7 '17 at 18:34
  • @jcalz yes exactly, thanks! – artem Sep 7 '17 at 19:17
0

Is this an option for you?

const PARAMS = {
  green: {color: 0x007700} as THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters,
  black: {color: 0x000000} as THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters,
  white: {color: 0xffffff} as THREE.MeshBasicMaterialParameters,
};

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