51

My question may seem simple but, I have a module that I launch in a terminal like this:

python -m my_module.my_file

How do I debug this in Visual Studio Code?

I have this in my launch.json (documentation)

"type": "python",
"request": "launch",
"pythonPath": "D:\\ProgramData\\Anaconda3\\envs\\simulec\\python.exe",
"args": [
   "-m",
   "my_module.my_file",
]

If I don't set the program option or if I set it to "" I get "File does not exist" Error.

How can I fix this?

8 Answers 8

59

Actually, there is a very simple option to do this I found by accident while trying to edit the launch.json file.

"type": "python",
"request": "launch",
"pythonPath": "D:\\ProgramData\\Anaconda3\\envs\\simulec\\python.exe",
"module": "my_module.my_file",

Simply specify the module in the module key "module": "my_module.my_file"

The -m is not useful any more.

5
  • 4
    Thank you! I had a hard time finding this. After reading the the docs more carefully I found this option is mentioned under python debugging: code.visualstudio.com/docs/python/…
    – E. Moffat
    Dec 11, 2017 at 18:14
  • 1
    thanks it's working! However, the relaive imported packages can't be found anymore even I set "cwd": "${workspaceFolder}" in launch.json. Any Solution? Jul 6, 2021 at 6:23
  • @zheyuanWang A year too late, but I figured out the solution for relative imports. You must also set the property "cwd":"${workspaceFolder}".
    – Alecg_O
    Jul 29, 2022 at 2:55
  • @Alecg_O I don't understand. @zheyuanWang says that it didn't work with cwd: ${workspaceFolder}; and your solution is setting cwd: ${workspaceFolder}? Is there a typo or something?
    – Brainor
    Dec 22, 2022 at 2:27
  • @zheyuanWang If you are within the package directory, just add "cwd": "${workspaceFolder}/.." to your launch.json file to change to its parent directory. In this way, Vscode should see you package directory.
    – user13343959
    Dec 11, 2023 at 19:44
12

In a terminal like this: python -m xyz abc.z3

(Please make sure you are opening "the root folder of your project").

{
    // Use IntelliSense to learn about possible attributes.
    // Hover to view descriptions of existing attributes.
    // For more information, visit: https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=830387
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "module",
            "type": "python",
            "request": "launch",
            "module": "xyz",
            "args": [
                "abc.z3"
            ]
        }
    ],
}
10

To add slightly to dzada's answer, which helped me a lot, a Visual Studio Code variable can be used to make this general for debugging any file that is in your module.

{
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "Python: Module",
            "type": "python",
            "request": "launch",
            "module": "my_module.${fileBasenameNoExtension}"
        }
    ]
}

Which is probably what you want to do.

2
6

The answer from @dzada was a bit confusing for me so I tried to rephrase it and add more clarification.

To debug a module in file called script_file.py that exists in a package called packagex with structure like the following:

Project_Folder
   packagex
      script_file.py

Your configuration in the launch.json file should looks like the following

    "configurations": [
    {
        "name": "Python: any name like script_file",
        "type": "python",
        "request": "launch",
        "module": "packagex.script_file"
    }
]
0
6

After some searching, I found that the config can be generalized for any module by the use of the Command Variable extension. Assuming that the your workspace folder is the one containing the package, the following configuration would work for any module:

{
    "name": "Python: Module",
    "type": "python",
    "request": "launch",
    "justMyCode": true,
    "module": "${command:extension.commandvariable.file.relativeFileDotsNoExtension}",
    "cwd":"${workspaceFolder}"
}
0
1
{
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "module",
            "type": "pythonExperimental",
            "request": "launch",
            "module": "my_package.my_module.${fileBasenameNoExtension}",
        },
    ]
}
1

Others have mentioned it already, for me in 2024 this works:

{
    "version": "0.2.0",
    "configurations": [
        {
            "name": "Python: Current File",
            "type": "debugpy",
            "request": "launch",
            "program": "${file}",
            "console": "integratedTerminal",
            "env": {
                "PYTHONPATH": "${workspaceFolder}"
            },
            "cwd": "${workspaceFolder}"
        }
    ]
}

The structure of your code should be:

your_project/
│
├── .vscode/
│   ├── launch.json
│
└── (other project files and folders)
0

All answers require changing the launch.json file each time w.r.t. the module you want to debug. I.e., one has to replace "program": "${file}", with "module": "package.module_to_debug" according to the docs.

One way to avoid repeatedly changing the launch.json (or even avoid using it) is to create a run.py and import the module of interests there. By using run.py as a proxy script to debug, you can do all debugging, e.g., adding breakpoints, without rigorous settings.

Concretely speaking, the layout looks as the following if we create a new project using poetry new pypkg

$ tree . 
.
├── README.md
├── poetry.lock
├── pypkg
│   ├── __init__.py
│   ├── module_1
│   │   ├── __init__.py
│   │   └── foo.py
│   └── my_module.py
├── pyproject.toml
├── run.py
└── tests
    └── __init__.py

where we have the run.py as

from pypkg.my_module import main 

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

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