Why won't this work?

 0. #define CONCAT(x, y) x ## y
 1. 
 2. #define VAR_LINE(x) \
 3.     int CONCAT(_anonymous, __LINE__) = x
 4. 
 5. #define VAR_LINE2(x) \
 6.     int _anonymous ## x = 1
 7.
 8. int main()
 9. {
10.     VAR_LINE(1);
11.     VAR_LINE(1);
12.     VAR_LINE(1);
13.     VAR_LINE2(__LINE__);
14. }

The result from the above macro expansion

int _anonymous__LINE__ = 1;
int _anonymous__LINE__ = 1;
int _anonymous__LINE__ = 1;
int _anonymous13 = 1;

It would be convenient if I didn't have to write that __LINE__ macro as an argument.

I'm thinking the problem is pretty clear. I want to be able to generate anonymous variables so that this macro doesn't fail with redefinition error when declaring several variables within the same scope. My idea was to use the predefined __LINE__ macro because no variable will ever be declared on the same line like this. But the macro expansion troubles me, can you help?

Update: Correct answer

Thanks to Luc Touraille. However, there was a tiny problem with the suggested solution. There has to be whitespace between the operands and the ## operator (apparently the standard says otherwise but the the PS3 flavoured GCC would not expand the macro properly if there were no whitespace between the operator and operands).

#define _CONCAT(x,y) x ## y
#define CONCAT(x,y) _CONCAT(x,y)

The VAR_LINE macro now yields:

int _anonymous10 = 1;
int _anonymous11 = 1;
int _anonymous12 = 1;

This has been verified to work under Win32 (Visual Studio 2008), XBOX360 (Xenon) and PS3.

  • It's not, I understand why you might think that. Anonymous variables have many uses. I need the duration of objects to be in scope. Without a name, be it anonymous or not they will simply created and right after destroys that same object. – John Leidegren Jan 20 '09 at 16:43
  • But that means you're relying on side-effects. If a method requires a certain object to exist, pass the object as a parameter. Make the dependancy explicit, it will make maintenance easier. I guess you must be using a singleton style interface to access the anonymous objects? – Skizz Jan 21 '09 at 9:59
  • To expand on the whole 'anonymous is bad' - someone in the future will forget to create the object and won't realise its importance until the program crashes and even then won't be totally sure why. By naming the object and passing it as a parameter will catch the error at compile time. – Skizz Jan 21 '09 at 10:03
  • You also have threading issues - what if two threads create the same anonymous object - which one should be used? – Skizz Jan 21 '09 at 10:05
  • There's no threading issue and the anonymous objects are not accessible. They sole purpose here is ensure object life-time and that requires a name. Be it anonymous or not. The example does not convey in anyway what I'm trying to do and so I understand it can be confusing. – John Leidegren Feb 7 '09 at 11:36
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You need to add a level of indirection so that __LINE__ will be expanded:

#define _CONCAT_(x,y) x ## y
#define CONCAT(x,y) _CONCAT_(x,y)

#define VAR_LINE(x) int CONCAT(_anonymous, __LINE__) = x
  • Here's the deal, there's a problem with your suggested solution. There has to be whitespace between the operands and the ## operator. Your suggested solution should read #define _CONCAT_(x,y) x ## y. – John Leidegren Jan 21 '09 at 15:40
  • Well this is weird, the standard specifically states that "Space around the # and ## tokens in the macro definition is optional." (16.3.5 par.6). Anyway, I'll edit my answer accordingly. – Luc Touraille Jan 21 '09 at 16:15
  • 1
    Indeed it is, I checked this with people at work as well. Apparently the PS3 flavoured GCC would not expand the macro properly if there were no whitespace between the operator and operands. – John Leidegren Jan 22 '09 at 10:44

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