0

I am in need of a quick fix for php to prevent attacks taking down my server relating to php bug #53632

Some of my servers are 32bit and contain various clients php scripts.

Ideally I will patch PHP to the latest version, but in the mean time I thought using the php.ini auto_prepend_file directive to automatically include a fix would buy me some time. Can you see any problems with this temporary fix?

So I edited my php.ini file and add:

auto_prepend_file = c:\wamp\www\php-53632-fix.php

Code:

<?php

if ($_REQUEST)
{
    foreach ($_REQUEST as $fixKey => $fixValue)
    {
        if (strstr(str_replace('.','',$fixValue),'22250738585072011')) 
        {
            unset($_REQUEST[$fixKey]);
            unset($_COOKIE[$fixKey]);
            unset($_POST[$fixKey]);
            unset($_GET[$fixKey]);          
            $GLOBALS[$fixKey]="";
        }
    }
    reset($_REQUEST);
    unset($fixKey);
    unset($fixValue);
}

if ($_SERVER)
{
    foreach ($_SERVER as $fixKey => $fixValue)
    {
        if (strstr(str_replace('.','',$fixValue),'22250738585072011')) 
        {
            unset($_SERVER[$fixKey]);
            $GLOBALS[$fixKey]="";
        }
    }
    reset($_SERVER);
    unset($fixKey);
    unset($fixValue);
}
1

This relies on the fact that no REQUEST variable hiding is taking place.

A malicious request posting to index.php?var=2.22507... and supplying a POST variable also named var, only one will appear within the REQUEST array. It takes a maximum of two, and a minimum of one request to bypass this filter.

      GET[var]   POST[var]  REQUEST[var]
req1  test       2.225..    test
req2  2.225..    test       2.225..

One will cause the request to go undetected depending on server configuration. This can also be done with other combinations, i.e. GET/COOKIE, POST/COOKIE etc, you get the idea.

Each array should be checked individually. In fact, you may even get away with not checking REQUEST, it being an aggregate. It's slightly more overhead but it's more secure if you cannot guarantee that you're never using $_GET, $_POST or $_COOKIE directly in your code.

3

Why do you want to continue the obviously maliscious request at all? I'd just terminate script like here.

0

I agree, just kill the script once you encounter one of the bad values.

See http://www.aircraft24.com/en/info/php-float-dos-quickfix.htm for our latest workaround.

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