Hello Stack Overflow Community,

I am currently taking an intro to computer architecture/organization course and the textbook we are using is called Computer Organization and Design by David Patterson and John Hennessey (5th Edition) and they list an example of how to access elements in an array using MIPS. The example they list goes something like this:

Given the C code assignment: g = h + A[8]; convert the following to MIPS. Where g = $s1, h = $s2, and the obase address A = $s3.

They go on to say that the MIPS instructions that represent the same instruction in C code are as follows:

 (1) lw $t0, 8($s3) # Temporary register $t0 gets A[8]
 (2) add $s1,$s2,$t0 # g = h +A[8]

Then on another page, the authors mention that line (1) could have also been written as:

(3) lw $t0,32($s3)

My question is what is the difference between lines (1) and (3) and why is that important?

Thanks!!!

  • What pages are these excepts on? I have the same edition. This doesn't sound correct. If you wanted the 8th word in an array of words you need the offset to be index*word size, which would be 8*4 = 32. – ktb Sep 8 '17 at 1:41
  • Don't know why the author said those 2 lines were equivalent, 32($s3) loads the 8th word from register $s3 while 8($s3) just loads the 2nd word, so the 8th element in the array is accessed at 32 + the base address which is $s3 which is 32($s3). In one word, those 2 lines are not equivalent – Dummy Sep 8 '17 at 1:41
  • Pages 69,71,and 72 – avenger12 Sep 8 '17 at 1:41
  • Mr. avenger12, nobody here has that book so page numbers aren't going to help much. The only way you could have written line 3 instead of line 1 and have it do the same thing is if the address in register $s3 were different. My guess is that's what's missing: Perhaps there was already an address in $s3, and it's known to be 24 bytes less than the address of A, and rather than load the address of A into $s3 just to then load 8($s3), instead, forego loading the address of A into $s3 and just load 32($s3) instead, saving an instruction. That's my guess. – phonetagger Sep 8 '17 at 21:11
  • So it occurred to me that perhaps you're Ms. avenger12; no offense intended if that is the case. – phonetagger Sep 8 '17 at 21:20

The only way you could have written line 3 instead of line 1 and have it do the same thing is if the address in register $s3 were different. My guess is that's what's missing: Perhaps there was already an address in $s3, and it's known to be 24 bytes less than the address of A, and rather than load the address of A into $s3 just to then load 8($s3), instead, forego loading the address of A into $s3 and just load 32($s3) instead, saving an instruction. That's my guess.

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