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I have a class in C#, that has a number of variables. Let's call it "QuestionItem". I have a list of this object, which the user modifies, and then sends it via JSON serialization (with Newtonsoft JSON library) to the server. To do so, I deserialize the objects that are already in the server, as a List<QuestionItem>, then add this new modified object to the list, and then serialize it back to the server.

In order to display this list of QuestionItems to the user, I deserialize the JSON as my object, and display it somewhere.

Now, the problem is - that I want to change this QuestionItem and add some variables to it.

But I can't send this NewQuestionItem to the server, because the items in the server are of type OldQuestionItem.

How do I merge these two types, or convert the old type to the new one, while the users with the old version will still be able to use the app?

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  • 1
    "while the users with the old version will still be able to use the app" - this is backward compatibility, it is the easiest versioning to implement/maintain. Since you didn't provide the code I can't answer more specifically.
    – Sinatr
    Sep 8, 2017 at 12:00
  • 2
    If you are just adding new properties, why is this even a problem? Just add those new properties to your QuestionItem type. For new JSON objects, they will be filled, for old ones they won’t.
    – poke
    Sep 10, 2017 at 12:52
  • 2
    I don’t understand. JSON decoders are usually able to handle extra properties or missing properties just fine. Maybe you should add some code to show what you’re actually doing and how just expanding your type does not work for you.
    – poke
    Sep 10, 2017 at 13:02
  • 3
    I cannot really believe that since I’m able to run JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<Test>>("[{},{}]") just fine for any definition of Test. Show your code.
    – poke
    Sep 10, 2017 at 13:11
  • 1
    Sure, you do not have to map a JSON object to a statically typed object. You can just keep it as a dynamic JSON object. But just because you do it, does not mean that those other users will do it in their code. And you already said that you won’t get those to update anything, so you’re out of luck there.
    – poke
    Sep 12, 2017 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

6
+50

You are using an Object Oriented Language, so you might aswell use inheritance if possible.

Assuming your old QuestionItem to be:

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptOut)]
public class QuestionItem 
{
    [JsonConstructor]
    public QuestionItem(int Id, int Variant)
    {
        this.Id = Id;
        this.Variant = Variant;
    }

    public int Id { get; }
    public int Variant { get; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

you can extend it by creating a child class:

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptOut)]
public class NewQuestionItem : QuestionItem
{
    private DateTime _firstAccess;

    [JsonConstructor]
    public NewQuestionItem(int Id, int Variant, DateTime FirstAccess) : base(Id, Variant)
    {
        this.FirstAccess = FirstAccess;
    }
    public DateTime FirstAccess { get; }
}

Note that using anything different than the default constructor for a class requires you to use the [JsonConstructor] Attribute on this constructor and every argument of said constructor must be named exactly like the corresponding JSON properties. Otherwise you will get an exception, because there is no default constructor available.

Your WebAPI will now send serialized NewQuestionItems, which can be deserialized to QuestionItems. In fact: By default, JSON.NET as with most Json libraries, will deserialize it to any object if they have at least one property in common. Just make sure that any member of the object you want to serialize/desreialize can actually be serialized.

You can test the example above with the following three lines of code:

var newQuestionItem = new NewQuestionItem(1337, 42, DateTime.Now) {Name = "Hello World!"};
var jsonString = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(newQuestionItem);
var oldQuestionItem = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<QuestionItem>(jsonString);

and simply looking at the property values of the oldQuestionItem in the debugger.

So, this is possible as long as your NewQuestionItem only adds properties to an object and does neither remove nor modify them.

If that is the case, then your objects are different and thus, requiring completely different objects with a different URI in your API, as long as you still need to maintain the old instance on the existing URI.

Which brings us to the general architecture:

The most clean and streamline approach to what you are trying to achieve is to properly version your API.

For the purpose of this link I am assuming an Asp.NET WebApi, since you are handling the JSON in C#/.NET. This allows different controller methods to be called upon different versions and thus, making structural changes the resources your API is providing depending on the time of the implementation. Other API will provide equal or at least similar features or they can be implemented manually.

Depending on the amount and size of the actual objects and potential complexity of the request- and resultsets it might also be worth looking into wrapping requests or responses with additional information. So instead of asking for an object of type T, you ask for an Object of type QueryResult<T> with it being defined along the lines of:

[JsonObject(MemberSerialization.OptOut)]
public class QueryResult<T>
{
    [JsonConstructor]
    public QueryResult(T Result, ResultState State, 
            Dictionary<string, string> AdditionalInformation)
    {
        this.Result = result;
        this.State = state;
        this.AdditionalInformation = AdditionalInformation;
    }

    public T Result { get; }
    public ResultState State { get; }
    public Dictionary<string, string> AdditionalInformation { get; }
}

public enum ResultState : byte
{
    0 = Success,
    1 = Obsolete,
    2 = AuthenticationError,
    4 = DatabaseError,
    8 = ....
}

which will allow you to ship additional information, such as api version number, api version release, links to different API endpoints, error information without changing the object type, etc.

The alternative to using a wrapper with a custom header is to fully implement the HATEOAS constraint, which is also widely used. Both can, together with proper versioning, save you most of the trouble with API changes.

0

How about you wrapping your OldQuestionItem as a property of QuestionItem? For example:

public class NewQuestionItem
{
    public OldQuestionItem OldItem { get; set; }
    public string Property1 {get; set; }
    public string Property2 {get; set; }
    ...
}

This way you can maintain the previous version of the item, yet define new information to be returned.

Koda

0

You can use something like

public class OldQuestionItem
{
  public DateTime UploadTimeStamp {get; set;} //if less then DateTime.Now then it QuestionItem 
  public string Property1 {get; set; }
  public string Property2 {get; set; }
  ...

  public OldQuestionItem(NewQuestionItem newItem)
  {
     //logic to convert new in old
  }
}

public class NewQuestionItem : OldQuestionItem
{

}

and use UploadTimeStamp as marker to understand, what Question is it.

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