I am wondering - how can I move all the files in a directory except those files in a specific directory (as 'mv' does not have a '--exclude' option)?

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Lets's assume the dir structure is like,

|parent
    |--child1
    |--child2
    |--grandChild1
    |--grandChild2
    |--grandChild3
    |--grandChild4
    |--grandChild5
    |--grandChild6

And we need to move files so that it would appear like,

|parent
    |--child1
    |   |--grandChild1
    |   |--grandChild2
    |   |--grandChild3
    |   |--grandChild4
    |   |--grandChild5
    |   |--grandChild6
    |--child2

In this case, you need to exclude two directories child1 and child2, and move rest of the directories in to child1 directory.

use,

mv !(child1|child2) child1

This will move all of rest of the directories into child1 directory.

  • 11
    Tip: Note however that using this pattern relies on extglob. You can enable it using shopt -s extglob (If you want extended globs to be turned on by default you can add shopt -s extglob to .bashrc) – Boris D. Teoharov Aug 20 '14 at 19:03
  • 2
    I keep getting -bash: !: event not found when trying to do this command. – Pred Dec 4 '14 at 1:10
  • Derp, just realized the comment above is required for bash. – Pred Dec 4 '14 at 1:14
  • How can this be forced? when there are no other directories other than the ones ignored? mv -f does not seem to work. I've temp solved it by creating a temp directory so there are three dirs in total, then moving all directories, then removing the temp dir. ugly! – Michael Trouw Apr 7 '15 at 14:21
  • Be careful with this one that you really want everything in that directory in that other directory! – Noumenon Aug 31 '16 at 15:46

Since find does have an exclude option, use find + xargs + mv:

find /source/directory -name ignore-directory-name -prune -print0 | xargs -0 mv --target-directory=/target/directory

Note that this is almost copied from the find man page (I think using mv --target-directory is better than cpio).

This isn't exactly what you asked for, but it might do the job:

mv the-folder-you-want-to-exclude somewhere-outside-of-the-main-tree
mv the-tree where-you-want-it
mv the-excluded-folder original-location

(Essentially, move the excluded folder out of the larger tree to be moved.)

So, if I have a/ and I want to exclude a/b/c/*:

mv a/b/c ../c
mv a final_destination
mkdir -p a/b
mv ../c a/b/c

Or something like that. Otherwise, you might be able to get find to help you.

  • And if the files you are moving are in your root? Some systems, for instance, only give user access to one directory (some cloud IDEs are a good example). Maybe someone wants to move everything to a child directory. This won't work. – Kallaste Sep 25 '17 at 18:00
  • As I said (six years ago), the answer doesn't describe exactly what was asked for, and it only might do the job. For most cases, it should work; certainly, yours is an exception to that. – Thanatos Sep 25 '17 at 23:00
  • You're right, it does not. But my point was not that it wasn't what was asked for, but that it in some cases would not work. My example was just a hypothetical to demonstrate that. – Kallaste Sep 26 '17 at 4:27

This will move all files at or below the current directory not in the ./exclude/ directory to /wherever...

find -E . -not -type d -and -not -regex '\./exclude/.*' -exec echo mv {} /wherever \;
  • this will ignore directory structure and copy all files in sub directories into one flat folder structure. a/b/c/ -> /wherever a/b.txt -> /wherever – Rasika Perera Jul 2 '15 at 5:04

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