53

How do I get the height of the div which includes the clipped area of the div ?

<div style="height: 20px; overflow: hidden">
  content<br>content<br>content<br>
  content<br>content<br>content<br>
  content<br>content<br>content<br>
</div>
3
  • 3
    for anyone looking for the better approach skip the accepted answer and try the @Colt answer. Commented May 26, 2013 at 1:57
  • 3
    Except that answer uses jQuery, and this question did not ask anything about jQuery.
    – L0j1k
    Commented Jun 9, 2014 at 19:29
  • 1
    I think the point was in the use of scrollHeight... not the jQuery
    – Giraldi
    Commented Jun 16, 2016 at 7:28

6 Answers 6

52

Well, you cannot do it that way, but it's possible when adding a inner element to your container, like this:

<div id="element" style="height: 20px; overflow: hidden;">
    <p id="innerElement"> <!-- notice this inner element -->
        content<br />content<br />content<br />
        content<br />content<br />content<br />
        content<br />content<br />content<br />
    </p>
</div>

sidenote: wrapping content inside paragraphs is a good practice too, plus that one extra element isn't giving that much of problems, if any at all...

And JavaScript:

var innerHeight = document.getElementById('innerElement').offsetHeight;
alert(innerHeight);

P.S. For this JavaScript to work, put it after your #element div, because plain JavaScript is executed before DOM is ready if it's not instructed to do so. To make this work when DOM is ready, check this.

But I'd suggest getting jQuery, it will come in handy later on if you're going to extend JavaScript operations in your site.

Plus, jQuery is the power, for real!

That way, simply add this script to your <head /> (assuming you've jQuery included):

$(document).ready(function() {
 var innerHeight = $('#innerElement').height();
 alert(innerHeight);
});

Example @jsFiddle using jQuery way!

3
  • Yep. Looks like this is the best way to do it. Thanks. Oh and yes, I love jQuery. Lovely library. Commented Jan 6, 2011 at 9:13
  • 2
    Tip: (This just caught me out) if you keep getting 0 returned from height or offsetHeight, make sure that you have set your elements to be visible before you do the measuring. Commented Oct 30, 2012 at 20:25
  • It's not necessary to add an inner element, the scrollHeight property contains the height of the element including the clipped area.
    – Mathijs
    Commented Jan 27, 2020 at 9:56
51

This works in all cases, whether you have a text node inside or a container. This is using jquery, but you don't need to.

//return the total height.
totalHeight = $('#elem')[0].scrollHeight;
//return the clipped height.
visibleHeight = $('#elem').height();

$('#elem')[0] is returning the dom element from the jquery call. so you can use that on any dom elem using plain ol' javascript.

2
  • 1
    The trick is in the scrollHeight property here, which contains the height of the element before clipping. The property is available without jQuery.
    – Mathijs
    Commented Jan 27, 2020 at 9:58
  • Thank you! I tried without [0] and got undefined... Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 21:08
8

Here is one way to achieve what you need, using Fabian idea:

function GetHeight() {
    var oDiv = document.getElementById("MyDiv");
    var sOriginalOverflow = oDiv.style.overflow;
    var sOriginalHeight = oDiv.style.height;
    oDiv.style.overflow = "";
    oDiv.style.height = "";
    var height = oDiv.offsetHeight;
    oDiv.style.height = sOriginalHeight;
    oDiv.style.overflow = sOriginalOverflow;
    alert("Real height is " + height);
}

Live demo and test case: http://jsfiddle.net/yahavbr/7Lbz9/

3
  • Yep, this would do. Although was hoping I would not need to remove the overflow before calculate the height. Commented Jan 6, 2011 at 9:14
  • Actually, this happens to solve my problem perfectly, as the speed at which the overflow is set/reset does not put in a scroll Commented Jan 6, 2011 at 9:21
  • @Prakash as I'm only setting a variable then set the original overflow and height back, it's done within one "tick" of the CPU so user won't see any change in UI. Commented Jan 6, 2011 at 9:25
5

Use scrollHeight of the element instead of clientHeight or offsetHeight.

Wrapping the content approach is better though.

1
  • Fantastic! Thank you!
    – Alex Mckay
    Commented Jan 22, 2021 at 1:39
2

Thats not possible afaik. What you could try is to remove that style and set it using javascript after you got the height. Not the most elegant solution, but i think its the only one.

1
  • I gave flesh and bones to that idea, IMO it's elegant enough when wrapped nicely into a function. :) Commented Jan 6, 2011 at 9:07
0

Native Javascript. Supported as far back as MSIE 6:

<div id="cont" style="width:100px;height:100px;overflow:auto;border:#000 solid 1px;">
    <div style="height:1500px;">dddd</div>
</div>


<script>alert(document.getElementById('cont').scrollHeight)</script>

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