What is the difference between apply and also. From what I know the following code does the same thing:

apply

val person = Person().apply {
    name = "Tony Stark"
    age = 52
    // More such stuff
}

also

val person = Person().also {
  it.name = "Tony Stark"
  it.age = 52
  // More such stuff
}

Is there any difference and should I use one over the other? Also, are there some cases where one would work and the other won't?

up vote 13 down vote accepted

also

Definition:

inline fun <T> T.also(block: (T) -> Unit): T (source)

Calls the specified function block with this value as its argument and returns this value.

apply

Definition:

inline fun <T> T.apply(block: T.() -> Unit): T (source)

Calls the specified function block with this value as its receiver and returns this value.

Difference

The also function receives a lambda, to which T is passed in the implementation, thus inside the lambda you refer to it with a name (it by default).

In apply on the other hand, a function literal with receiver is used, so inside the passed lambda you don't have to add additional prefixes to access its members, as you see in your example. The receiver can be referenced by this.

when to use what

Usage examples are explained in this thread.

Short answer: also was introduced for semantic reasons.

Long answer:

If you use apply you always refer to the receiver with this.

val person = Person().apply {
    name = "Tony Stark" // this. can be omitted
    age = 52 // this. can be omitted
    // ...
}

This way you don't have to repeat person several times as shown here:

person.name = "Tony Stark"
person.age = 52

If the block becomes longer you may want to give this a name. That's why also was introduced. Now you can refer to the receiver either by it or an explicit name. This is especially useful if you want to use another name than (in this case person) before:

val person = Person().also { newPerson ->
  newPerson.name = "Tony Stark"
  newPerson.age = 52
  // ...
}

So, depending on how well you code should be readable you can always use one or the other.

The answers given above make a little sense, but not much. I don't understand it correctly but I wanted to add on to the question here.

In Standard.kt, this is the actual implementation for the two methods.

For apply

/**
 * Calls the specified function [block] with `this` value as its receiver and returns `this` value.
 */
@kotlin.internal.InlineOnly
public inline fun <T> T.apply(block: T.() -> Unit): T {
    contract {
        callsInPlace(block, InvocationKind.EXACTLY_ONCE)
    }
    block()
    return this
}

For also

/**
 * Calls the specified function [block] with `this` value as its argument and returns `this` value.
 */
@kotlin.internal.InlineOnly
@SinceKotlin("1.1")
public inline fun <T> T.also(block: (T) -> Unit): T {
    contract {
        callsInPlace(block, InvocationKind.EXACTLY_ONCE)
    }
    block(this)
    return this
}

The two methods are pretty much same except one line. Only after going through the explanations, I saw the difference. Functional Language like Kotlin is really challenging for a Java minded junior developer like me.

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