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I am trying to apply some machine learning algorithms to a dataset in Spark (Java). When Trying the example of Logistic regression in spark the CoefficientMatrixis is something like this: 3 x 4 CSCMatrix (1,2) -0.7889290490451877 (0,3) 0.2989598305580243 (1,3) -0.36583869680195286 Intercept: [0.07898530675801645,-0.14799468898820128,0.06900938223018485]

If i am not wrong, the
(1,2) -0.7889290490451877 (0,3) 0.2989598305580243 (1,3) -0.36583869680195286 represent "best-fit" model for every class.

Now when I am trying my dataset, which has 4 different classes and 8192 feature, the Coefficients is 4 x 8192 CSCMatrix Intercept: [1.3629726436521425,0.7373644161565249,-1.0762606057817274,-1.0240764540269398]

I am not familiar with the Logistic regression algorithm, so I can not understand why the there is no "best-fit"?

my code

HashingTF hashingTF = new HashingTF()
              .setInputCol("listT")
              .setOutputCol("rawFeatures")
              .setNumFeatures(8192) ;
Dataset<Row> featurizedData = hashingTF.transform(ReviewRawData);
        featurizedData.show();
        IDF idf = new IDF().setInputCol("rawFeatures").setOutputCol("features");
        IDFModel idfModel = idf.fit(featurizedData);
        Dataset<Row> rescaledData = idfModel.transform(featurizedData);
//add the label col based on some conditions
        Dataset<Row> lebeldata = rescaledData.withColumn("label",newCol );
        lebeldata.groupBy("label").count().show();  
Dataset<Row>[] splits = lebeldata.select("label","features").randomSplit(new double[]{0.7, 0.3});
        Dataset<Row> train = splits[0];
        Dataset<Row> test = splits[1];

        LogisticRegression lr = new LogisticRegression()
                .setMaxIter(10)
                .setRegParam(0.3)
                .setElasticNetParam(0.8)
                .setLabelCol("label")
                .setFeaturesCol("features")
                .setFamily("multinomial");

        LogisticRegressionModel lrModel = lr.fit(train);
        System.out.println("Coefficients: \n"
                + lrModel.coefficientMatrix() + " \nIntercept: " + 
         lrModel.interceptVector());

My dataset

+-----+-----+
|label|count|
+-----+-----+
|  0.0| 6455|
|  1.0| 3360|
|  3.0|  599|
|  2.0|  560|
+-----+-----+

And when evaluate the classifier, just the first class was predicted.

Class 0.000000 precision = 0.599511
Class 0.000000 recall = 1.000000
Class 0.000000 F1 score = 0.749618
Class 1.000000 precision = 0.000000
Class 1.000000 recall = 0.000000
Class 1.000000 F1 score = 0.000000
Class 2.000000 precision = 0.000000
Class 2.000000 recall = 0.000000
Class 2.000000 F1 score = 0.000000
Class 3.000000 precision = 0.000000
Class 3.000000 recall = 0.000000
Class 3.000000 F1 score = 0.000000

By the way, I applied the same dataset with the same above steps to another machine learning algorithms on spark and it works fine!

  • Hey Mahmoud did you understand what the coefficient matrix is? This is a logistic regression so i think the weights should simply be in the form of 1xn for n features.Why are there multiple for each class since a single set of weights gives the probability of each class .Also what does best fit for each class mean? – jjojj Jun 29 '19 at 19:39
3

I had similar problem with LogisticRegression from spark.ml in Spark 2.1.1 and removing .setElasticNetParam(0.8) worked for me.

Another possiblity is that you have high leverage points (outlier in the range of features) in your dataset which skewed the prediction.

  • Thanks, can you explain what is that parameter for? And when we deleted it what happened? Thanks again let. – Mahmoud Murad Sep 9 '17 at 17:42
  • 1
    My guess is setElasticNetParam(0.8) will force the logistic regression to find a balance between L1 and L2 penalty, and in most cases the L1 penalization will push the regression coefficients to 0 and break the classifier. – Chang Sep 9 '17 at 19:21

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