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I'm wondering how Python parses:

not a < b < c

It seems to interpret this as:

not (a < b < c)

as opposed to (not a) < b < c

This question explains grouping vs chaining: Python comparison operators chaining/grouping left to right? but what are the rules for the precedence of chained comparisons?

It's strange to me that not, < and > have the same precedence, but not a < b < c parses as not (a < b < c) while -a < b < c parses as (-a) < b < c.

I tested this by evaluating not 2 > 1 > 2 in Python 2.7.

  • not 2 < 1 < 2 isn't being parsed as not (2 < 1 < 2). Each term is processed left-to-right. The not 2 is False which is the same as the numeric value 0—so it's equivalent to 0 < 1 < 2. – martineau Sep 10 '17 at 2:05
  • This tips was already viewed. Could be: stackoverflow.com/questions/25753474/… – Mauricio Vega Sep 10 '17 at 2:21
  • What made you think not, <, and > had the same precedence? – user2357112 supports Monica Sep 10 '17 at 2:54
  • @martineau I was using 2 > 1 > 2 not 2 < 1 < 2, and I don't think that's true about the parsing – nonagon Sep 10 '17 at 3:01
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    @user2357112 I mistook the not in and is not tests for the boolean not operator – nonagon Sep 10 '17 at 3:01
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Python has an Abstract Syntax Tree module to show you what's happening:

import ast
t = ast.parse('not a < b < c')
print(ast.dump(t))

It gives (cleaned up a bit):

[Expr(value=UnaryOp(
    op=Not(),
    operand=Compare(
        left=Name(id='a'),
        ops=[Lt(), Lt()],
        comparators=[Name(id='b'), Name(id='c')]
    )
))]

And indeed, the documentation says that not has lower precedence than <.

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