5

I have the following sophisticated type hierarchy in Java:

// the first type
interface Element<Type extends Element<Type>> {
    Type foo(Type a, Type b);
}

// the second type
interface Payload<Type extends Payload<Type>> {
    Type bar(Type[] array);
}

// some toy implementation
final class SomePayload implements Payload<SomePayload> {
    @Override
    public SomePayload bar(SomePayload[] array) { return array[0]; }
}

// mix of first and second interfaces
interface ComplicatedElement<
              PayloadT extends Payload<PayloadT>,
              ObjectT extends ComplicatedElement<PayloadT, ObjectT>>
          extends Element<ObjectT> {

    PayloadT getPayload();

    ObjectT add(ObjectT a, ObjectT b);
}

// some toy implementation
final class SomeComplicatedElement 
      implements ComplicatedElement<SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement> {
    final SomePayload data;

    public SomeComplicatedElement(SomePayload data) {
        this.data = data;
    }

    @Override
    public SomePayload getPayload(){ return data; }

    @Override
    public SomeComplicatedElement foo(SomeComplicatedElement a, SomeComplicatedElement b) {
        return b;
    }

    @Override
    public SomeComplicatedElement add(SomeComplicatedElement a, SomeComplicatedElement b) {
        return a;
    }
}

I have some static method which deals with ComplicatedElements:

public static <PayloadT extends Payload<PayloadT>,
              ObjectT extends ComplicatedElement<PayloadT, ObjectT>>
List<ObjectT> method(ObjectT input) {
    return Collections.singletonList(input);
}

Now, from Java I can call method without problems like this:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(method(new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload())));
}

However, when I try to do the same thing in Scala:

import FooBarJava.{SomeComplicatedElement, SomePayload, method}

def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
  println(method(new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload())))
}

I have this compilation error:

Error:(10, 21) inferred type arguments [Nothing,FooJava.SomeComplicatedElement] do not conform to method method's type parameter bounds [PayloadT <: FooJava.Payload[PayloadT],ObjectT <: FooJava.ComplicatedElement[PayloadT,ObjectT]] println(FooJava.method(new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload())))

I can fix this by specifying type parameters explicitly:

println(method[SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement](new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload())))

But it is very annoying and I would like to avoid this (I guess it is possible since Java compiler just work fine with this). Is there any way to do so?

3

(I guess it is possible since Java compiler just work fine with this)

Scala has richer type system than Java. For example in Java there is no type similar to Nothing in Scala (i.e. universal subtype). So it's possible that sometimes compiler in a language with richer type system will be unable to infer types while in similar situation compiler in a language with poorer type system can do this.

If specifying type parameters is too annoying why not to create some helper method?

private def methodWithPayload(data: SomePayload): java.util.List[SomeComplicatedElement] =
    method[SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement](new SomeComplicatedElement(data))

methodWithPayload(new SomePayload)

In Java there is the only option <SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement>method(..), in Scala there are two options method[SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement](..) and method[Nothing, SomeComplicatedElement](..) and both options are valid.

  • 1
    Helper method is not an option, since I'll have to implement several dozens of helper methods for different methods and different types of input. The example I've shown is a very basic one, in fact I need to work with Java library which has dozens of such static methods any many different subtypes of interfaces like ComplicatedElement (and I need use all them heavily), so I am looking for some general solution (add some implicits maybe ?). – Stanislav Poslavsky Sep 10 '17 at 15:57
  • Code generation is OK, but I can't modify the Java library, I can only use its API – Stanislav Poslavsky Sep 10 '17 at 16:01
  • I guess just adding implicits can't be useful without methods expecting those implicits. – Dmytro Mitin Sep 10 '17 at 16:39
  • The thing is that if we call method(new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload)) rather than like method(new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload), new SomePayload) Scala compiler doesn't know that method's first type parameter is the same as type of something inside new SomeComplicatedElement(...). – Dmytro Mitin Sep 10 '17 at 16:42
  • 1
    @StanislavPoslavsky Why do you think that "this is certainly possible"? Once again, in Java there is the only option <SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement>method(..), in Scala there are two options method[SomePayload, SomeComplicatedElement](..) and method[Nothing, SomeComplicatedElement](..) and both options are valid. How Scala compiler should guess? And if you feed SomeComplicatedElement(SomePayload) as an argument why does it mean that the first type parameter should be SomePayload? – Dmytro Mitin Sep 11 '17 at 13:25
0

An ugly hack which I came up with (which is especially useful when working with third-party Java library), is to create a single Java file in Scala project which makes all required unsafe type erasure:

//file HackScala.java
class HackScala {
    public static <T> T method(T obj){
         // erase types -- this is not possible in Scala
         return (T) FooBarJava.method((ComplicatedElement) obj);
    }
}

Then all will work just fine in Scala:

import FooBarJava.{SomeComplicatedElement, SomePayload}
import HackScala.method

def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
  // this will work fine and return correct type
  println(method(new SomeComplicatedElement(new SomePayload())))
}

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