13

I have an integer:

int iNums = 12476;

And now I want to get each digit from iNums as integer. Something like:

foreach(iNum in iNums){
   printf("%i-", iNum);
}

So the output would be: "1-2-4-7-6-". But i actually need each digit as int not as char.

Thanks for help.

13 Answers 13

-8
int iNums = 12345;
int iNumsSize = 5;
for (int i=iNumsSize-1; i>=0; i--) {
    int y = pow(10, i);
    int z = iNums/y;
    int x2 = iNums / (y * 10);
    printf("%d-",z - x2*10 );
}
  • 3
    Declaring the number size in advance is both tedious and unnecessary – KillianDS Jan 6 '11 at 13:02
  • Thanks, thats what I need, as I have an fixed number size anyways. – Ilyssis Jan 6 '11 at 13:02
  • 26
    Or alternatively, wait a little time to see if you get an even better answer. Quickest not necessarily best. – razlebe Jan 6 '11 at 13:13
  • 3
    @AliEl-sayedAli This is so horrible. Using pow() which is a floating-point number, for computing an integer is inherently inaccurate. This may well give wrong results for some large integers. – The Paramagnetic Croissant Sep 19 '15 at 19:05
39
void print_each_digit(int x)
{
    if(x >= 10)
       print_each_digit(x / 10);

    int digit = x % 10;

    std::cout << digit << '\n';
}
  • 1
    +1: you beat me to the recursive solution. I'll leave mine here, but you got here first. – D.Shawley Jan 6 '11 at 13:10
  • Beware that this code might not flush the cout stream. Change << '\n' to << endl to be sure that cout is flushed. – Andreas Mar 11 '16 at 10:26
  • 2
    @Andreas don't use endl unless you need it. – Abyx Mar 11 '16 at 10:30
  • @Andreas also please read the Core Guidelines – Abyx Mar 11 '16 at 10:31
  • Fair enough, but without the endl you're never really sure when the flush happens. there is no reason to flush; that's done automatically is a very arbitrary statement to make. – Andreas Mar 11 '16 at 11:31
21

Convert it to string, then iterate over the characters. For the conversion you may use std::ostringstream, e.g.:

int iNums = 12476;
std::ostringstream os;

os << iNums;
std::string digits = os.str();

Btw the generally used term (for what you call "number") is "digit" - please use it, as it makes the title of your post much more understandable :-)

  • I changed that number to digit. – Ilyssis Jan 6 '11 at 12:57
  • +1: This is the most general/flexible way to solve this type of problem in C++: learn this and you'll be ready for a lot of other small tasks. Once you have digits, you can iterate over the string printing each digit however you like. – Tony Delroy Jan 6 '11 at 13:43
  • Its ok for printing, but I needed the digits as int to work with them. – Ilyssis Jan 6 '11 at 14:03
  • @Ilyssis, fair enough, you mentioned this in your post. My fault :-( – Péter Török Jan 6 '11 at 14:22
  • Don't worry, I should have taken a better post title. – Ilyssis Jan 6 '11 at 14:45
11

Here is a more generic though recursive solution that yields a vector of digits:

void collect_digits(std::vector<int>& digits, unsigned long num) {
    if (num > 9) {
        collect_digits(digits, num / 10);
    }
    digits.push_back(num % 10);
}

Being that there are is a relatively small number of digits, the recursion is neatly bounded.

  • You are mixing signed and unsigned data types. Also, you are needlessly limiting the algorithm to 32-bits. Using unsigned long long would for both the vector and the data type of num would fix both of these issues. – Ben Key Oct 21 '18 at 23:39
  • @BenKey - when I wrote this C++11 hadn't come into existence yet so long long wasn't part of the standard. You are correct about mixing signed and unsigned though. – D.Shawley Oct 30 '18 at 11:59
4

I don't test it just write what is in my head. excuse for any syntax error

Here is online ideone demo

vector <int> v; 

int i = ....
while(i != 0 ){
    cout << i%10 << " - "; // reverse order
    v.push_back(i%10); 
    i = i/10;
}

cout << endl;

for(int i=v.size()-1; i>=0; i--){
   cout << v[i] << " - "; // linear
}
  • 2
    This prints each digit in reverse order. – D.Shawley Jan 6 '11 at 12:54
  • (-1) because you get 7654321 instead of 1-2-3-4-5-7. – Raphael Bossek Jan 6 '11 at 12:57
  • 2
    just a little bit carelessness my friends. Don't be so harsh – user467871 Jan 6 '11 at 13:02
  • I would rather use a deque, push_front and use ostream_iterator to send to cout. – Benoit Jan 6 '11 at 13:08
  • @Benoit thanks for your comment. Yes there is plenty of way to solve this problem and this comes to my mind first – user467871 Jan 6 '11 at 13:16
1

You can do it with this function:

void printDigits(int number) {
    if (number < 0) { // Handling negative number
        printf('-');
        number *= -1;
    }
    if (number == 0) { // Handling zero
        printf('0');
    }
    while (number > 0) { // Printing the number
        printf("%d-", number % 10);
        number /= 10;
    }
}
0

Drawn from D.Shawley's answer, can go a bit further to completely answer by outputing the result:

void stream_digits(std::ostream& output, int num, const std::string& delimiter = "")
{
    if (num) {
        stream_digits(output, num/10, delimiter);
        output << static_cast<char>('0' + (num % 10)) << delimiter;
    }
}

void splitDigits()
{
    int num = 12476;    
    stream_digits(std::cout, num, "-");    
    std::cout << std::endl;
}
0

I don't know if this is faster or slower or worthless, but this would be an alternative:

int iNums = 12476;
string numString;
stringstream ss;
ss << iNums;
numString = ss.str();
for (int i = 0; i < numString.length(); i++) {
    int myInt = static_cast<int>(numString[i] - '0'); // '0' = 48
    printf("%i-", myInt);
}

I point this out as iNums alludes to possibly being user input, and if the user input was a string in the first place you wouldn't need to go through the hassle of converting the int to a string.

(to_string could be used in c++11)

0

Based on @Abyx's answer, but uses div so that only 1 division is done per digit.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

void print_each_digit(int x)
{
    div_t q = div(x, 10);

    if (q.quot)
        print_each_digit(q.quot);

    std::cout << q.rem << '-';
}

int main()
{
    print_each_digit(12476);
    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

1-2-4-7-6-

N.B. Only works for non-negative ints.

0

To get digit at "pos" position (starting at position 1 as Least Significant Digit (LSD)):

digit = (int)(number/pow(10,(pos-1))) % 10;

Example: number = 57820 --> pos = 4 --> digit = 7


To sequentially get digits:

int num_digits = floor( log10(abs(number?number:1)) + 1 );
for(; num_digits; num_digits--, number/=10) {
    std::cout << number % 10 << " ";
}

Example: number = 57820 --> output: 0 2 8 7 5

0

My solution:

void getSumDigits(int n) {
    std::vector<int> int_to_vec;
    while(n>0)
    {
        int_to_vec.push_back(n%10);
        n=n/10;
    }

    int sum;

    for(int i=0;i<int_to_vec.size();i++)
    {
        sum+=int_to_vec.at(i);

    }
    std::cout << sum << ' ';
}
0

The answer I've used is this simple function:

int getDigit(int n, int position) {

    return (n%(int)pow(10, position) - (n % (int)pow(10, position-1))) / (int)pow(10, position-1);

}

Hope someone finds this helpful!

-1

I know this is an old post, but all of these answers were unacceptable to me, so I wrote my own!

My purpose was for rendering a number to a screen, hence the function names.

void RenderNumber(int to_print)
{
    if (to_print < 0)
    {
        RenderMinusSign()
        RenderNumber(-to_print);
    }
    else
    {
        int digits = 1; // Assume if 0 is entered we want to print 0 (i.e. minimum of 1 digit)
        int max = 10;

        while (to_print >= max) // find how many digits the number is 
        {
            max *= 10;
            digits ++;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < digits; i++) // loop through each digit
        {
            max /= 10;
            int num = to_print / max; // isolate first digit
            to_print -= num * max; // subtract first digit from number
            RenderDigit(num);
        }
    }
}

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