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I am trying to write a program that removes the last occurrence of an element from a list in Prolog. I am not supposed to use built in predicates here, except for member/2. I understand that I have to use recursion for this. But I'm not awfully good with it. I got as far as this, but it fails:

% remove_last/3 with (Element, List, Resultlist)
remove_last(X,[X|T],NT):-
   remove_last(X,T,NT).

I figure that Prolog is supposed to cut of the head of the list, scan the tail, do it over again until the tail matches with the Element, delete that and restore the remainder list. But I don't know how to put this in code. I would appreciate any tips!

closed as too broad by lurker, user7605325, blurfus, Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, stdunbar Sep 11 '17 at 21:33

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    What if an element occurs only once? – Willem Van Onsem Sep 11 '17 at 10:46
  • What if the element doesn't occur at all? Shoud the predicate fail? – lurker Sep 11 '17 at 21:29
  • @lurker: What is too broad here? – false Sep 12 '17 at 1:44
  • @false I had flagged this question before there was any code sample or anything other details posted. It was, at the time too broad/vague. The OP subsequently edited the question and added more detail. I've voted to reopen on the basis of the edit. – lurker Sep 12 '17 at 1:56
  • @lurker: So now reopen... – false Sep 12 '17 at 1:57
4

Here is a much more readable answer:

remove_last(X, [X|L], L) :-
    maplist(dif(X), L).
remove_last(X, [H|T], [H|L]) :-
    remove_last(X, T, L).

Obviously it uses built-ins which is apparently forbidden but I would argue that dif/2 is so important it might as well be considered as legal as e.g. \+ for things like this (same for maplist).

It behaves pretty nicely:

?- remove_last(2,[1,2,3,2,5],Z).               % "Normal" use
Z = [1, 2, 3, 5] ;
false

?- remove_last(Z,[1,2,3,2,5],[1,2,3,5]).       % Searching X given the two lists
Z = 2 ;
false.

?- remove_last(2,X,[1,2,3,5]).                 % Searching the original list
X = [1, 2, 2, 3, 5] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 2, 5] ;
X = [1, 2, 3, 5, 2] ;
false.

If everything is a variable, it kind of works but doesn't enumerate answers properly:

?- remove_last(X,L,M).
L = [X],
M = [] ;
L = [X, _1124],
M = [_1124],
dif(X, _1124) ;
L = [X, _1302, _1308],
M = [_1302, _1308],
dif(X, _1308),
dif(X, _1302) ;
…

You can make it enumerate answers properly using length/2:

?- length(L, _), remove_last(X,L,M).
L = [X],
M = [] ;
L = [X, _1230],
M = [_1230],
dif(X, _1230) ;
L = [_692, X],
M = [_692] ;
L = [X, _1408, _1414],
M = [_1408, _1414],
dif(X, _1414),
dif(X, _1408) ;
L = [_1242, X, _1254],
M = [_1242, _1254],
dif(X, _1254) ;
L = [_692, _698, X],
M = [_692, _698] ;

Run time

On a list of 1000 random digits:

?- time(remove_last(3,[8,1,5,1,8,2,0,1,8,2,0,4,2,1,6,8,6,1,0,3,5,6,3,5,3,1,8,7,7,4,8,8,0,9,3,8,7,9,0,6,4,8,1,9,2,9,0,1,0,0,9,7,7,5,2,5,8,5,1,6,8,3,2,8,7,2,9,0,5,9,5,0,9,6,7,1,4,9,7,1,3,5,0,0,0,3,3,7,7,7,9,4,9,8,0,8,7,0,7,7,0,8,3,0,9,3,4,8,8,1,3,7,8,8,8,2,7,4,2,8,4,0,6,9,3,9,0,2,0,7,9,5,9,0,8,3,3,4,3,4,2,3,0,4,6,8,9,3,6,0,9,7,6,4,8,7,3,8,9,5,4,2,7,2,9,3,0,5,3,7,9,0,3,4,5,3,5,0,9,4,4,5,2,9,0,9,2,6,1,6,3,4,6,3,9,9,0,6,0,7,9,3,8,3,0,7,1,3,5,4,9,1,9,0,4,8,2,5,3,7,5,7,2,7,3,2,1,7,9,3,9,3,6,4,3,6,9,8,1,3,7,6,0,8,0,4,6,6,4,4,8,5,1,8,5,9,1,7,6,2,8,0,2,5,0,7,2,7,9,2,6,7,6,2,8,2,1,9,2,5,6,8,0,2,2,2,3,2,0,6,9,5,7,3,8,9,9,6,9,9,3,3,7,5,9,0,2,2,6,3,7,1,4,7,4,0,9,1,1,5,2,2,3,4,7,8,8,3,4,1,2,6,8,2,8,0,0,7,5,6,5,9,0,6,5,6,4,0,4,5,6,7,4,5,1,5,9,9,9,3,6,1,0,6,8,6,0,6,6,0,9,4,2,3,8,8,8,4,3,0,4,7,1,4,7,7,4,6,6,3,0,0,7,1,5,1,6,2,9,1,3,5,0,6,6,4,8,7,0,6,3,7,0,0,8,6,9,3,1,2,6,2,6,1,0,1,7,4,6,4,3,9,2,5,5,7,4,1,8,8,1,3,8,0,9,0,9,7,5,5,9,6,6,3,8,3,1,5,9,5,1,0,6,7,1,5,0,4,7,1,1,4,4,9,5,8,4,2,1,5,3,2,4,6,8,6,8,6,9,5,5,7,3,6,0,6,0,3,8,0,0,5,1,8,7,3,9,9,3,2,6,7,4,2,6,5,4,2,6,8,6,2,2,3,5,0,5,2,8,5,4,0,0,3,5,0,8,2,0,1,7,3,0,2,4,3,8,4,9,5,2,5,9,1,3,4,3,3,6,7,7,3,6,0,8,8,4,1,3,9,0,1,3,3,4,0,8,4,2,5,1,0,5,2,5,2,3,1,2,3,9,3,5,2,8,7,9,3,4,0,0,7,5,1,7,5,8,2,6,4,8,4,7,0,5,9,7,3,4,8,9,6,4,1,8,6,8,5,0,0,8,9,2,5,8,0,0,6,8,1,9,3,7,2,6,3,3,4,0,4,1,6,3,7,5,2,5,8,9,8,1,7,1,5,2,8,7,5,8,3,7,4,9,6,2,3,7,1,0,2,9,9,3,3,2,9,6,0,3,4,0,4,4,4,5,1,3,2,6,7,5,7,9,4,4,4,1,9,7,4,0,5,2,6,1,2,4,4,7,3,8,9,2,8,0,3,1,5,0,7,7,8,1,9,6,1,9,4,9,7,6,4,0,2,1,7,9,0,8,9,9,6,6,3,7,8,7,1,1,7,3,3,4,4,8,0,2,1,1,7,2,6,8,6,2,1,2,2,4,7,5,9,3,4,4,9,3,0,8,4,4,4,5,8,0,2,5,5,0,6,2,1,7,4,0,7,1,6,4,3,9,0,1,1,0,9,3,0,7,1,2,8,4,0,2,7,2,8,6,5,1,8,0,0,4,5,6,0,1,9,6,1,5,1,9,0,0,2,7,1,2,4,1,2,0,8,9,1,4,7,3,1,1,8,8,4,4,5,8,0,0,5,0,9,7,1,1,5,1,6,4,0,4,8,7,0,2,7,9,1,4,6,2,8,9,1,6,1,4,0,7,9,9,9,0,6,8,8,2,0,4,4,6,0,0,2,0,0,6,4,6,2,5,5,7,7,8,1,9,6,6,6,7,8,5,7,0,1,0,9,1,4,2,1,7,2,1,6,7,6,4,7,5,7,7,7,4,4,2,6,7,1,1,3,3,7,6,2,9,8,9,9,2,4,7,2,2,8,8,3,3,6,4,2,4,4,5,4,0,8,3,4,6,5,3,1,1,0,3,0],Z)).
% 10,996 inferences, 0.000 CPU in 0.002 seconds (0% CPU, Infinite Lips)
Z = [8, 1, 5, 1, 8, 2, 0, 1, 8|...] .
  • What is the runtime cost? Is there some O(n^2) lurking? – false Sep 11 '17 at 14:24
  • @false Just a quick experiment, using the predicate in the expected direction by OP and selecting the penultimate element: takes 1047 inferences compared to Willem's 312 inferences (0 ms for both) for a list of 100 elements. For a list of 1000 elements, 10k inferences (2 ms) compared to 3k inferences (1 ms). So it seems to have a similar behavior to Willem's answer. – Fatalize Sep 11 '17 at 14:33
  • Please give the precise query, I suspect, you left out some inferences... – false Sep 11 '17 at 14:35
  • @false Given in the answer. – Fatalize Sep 11 '17 at 14:37
  • @lurker: it is impossible to define this without some built-in predicate. – false Sep 12 '17 at 1:43

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