5002

Is there a regular expression to verify an email address in JavaScript?

3
  • 4
    @Alex The reason I added this comment is that the suggested regex in the accepted answer will not allow existing live email addresses which is a bad start for a customer, and the really big problem is that even IF the address was accepted it still does not say if it works. The only way to reliably verify that a supplied email is a working valid email is to send a mail with a verification link. So, if your use case does not demand that you verify the email, just do a minimal test for @, otherwise use a verification email. Regex will only provide bad user experience. May 3 at 14:56
  • @David Mårtensson I added a + on your thoughts. However I do think that a verification email-link thing also can be bad user experience. One that can make you lose a customer.
    – mikael1000
    Jun 3 at 10:22
  • @mikael1000 Sure, but what is the purpose of a regex validation when you will not know if its a valid email anyway. If you do not want to intrude on the customer with a validation link just do the most simple validation <something> at <something> and leave it at that. It will ensure that the customer at least added something that might be an email, anything more it mostly a waste of code until you get to actually validating. You could possibly check if the domain exists with a dns lookup. Jun 4 at 14:23

100 Answers 100

2

Use the browser/runtime to handle parsing the input by prepending a protocol and pass it to the URL API, trapping any errors and check the resulting username and hostname properties of the result. It will handle basically all transformations and possibilities (punycode of character sets, etc). This only establishes that the input is parsable, not that is valid--that is only possible through checking if the destination machine receives messages for that alias. This provides a close (imo reasonable) guess though, and can be expanded to be more specific and realistic if you're comfortable both maintaining it and also risking invalid rejections. (Note it doesn't attempt to address IPv4 or IPv6 addresses, simply the broad range of customer-facing scenarios using a domain.)

function validEmail(email=''){
    var $0, url, isValid = false, emailPatternInput = /^[^@]{1,64}@[^@]{4,253}$/, emailPatternUrl = /^[^@]{1,64}@[a-z][a-z0-9\.-]{3,252}$/i;
    email = email.trim();
    try{
        url = new URL('http://'+email);
        $0 = `${url.username}@${url.hostname}`;
        isValid = emailPatternInput.test( email );
        if(!isValid) throw 'invalid email pattern on input:' + email;
        isValid = emailPatternUrl.test( $0 );
        if(!isValid) throw 'invalid email pattern on url:' + $0;
        console.log(`email looks legit "${email}" checking url-parts: "${$0 === email ? '-SAME-':$0}"`);
    }catch(err){
        console.error(`probably not an email address: "${email}"`, err);
    };
    return isValid;
}

['user+this@はじめよう.みんな', 'stuff@things', 'user+that@host.com', 'Jean+François@anydomain.museum','هيا@יאללה', '试@例子.测试.مثال.آزمایشی', 'not@@really', 'no'].forEach(email=>console.log(validEmail(email), email));

This is the both the simplest and most generally permissive example I can come up with. Please edit it in cases where it can be made to be more accurate while maintain its simplicity and reasonable generally permissive validity.

Also see MDN URL docs URL, window.URL and Nodejs for URL APIs.

2

You may try RegExp

function isValidEmail( value ) {
	return /^[\w\-\.\+]+\@[a-zA-Z0-9\.\-]+\.[a-zA-z0-9]{2,5}$/.test( value );
}

console.log( isValidEmail("mymail@mydomain.com") )

1
2

In my case, I wanted to avoid ~ and # that's why I have used another solution:

function validEmail(email){
  const regex = /^((?!\.)[\w-_.]*[^.])(@\w+)(\.\w+(\.\w+)?[^.\W])$/;
  return regex.test(email);
}

function validEmail(email){
  const regex = /^((?!\.)[\w-_.]*[^.])(@\w+)(\.\w+(\.\w+)?[^.\W])$/;
  return regex.test(email);
}

const emails = [
'pio_pio@factory.com',
'~pio_pio@factory.com',
'pio_~pio@factory.com',
'pio_#pio@factory.com',
'pio_pio@#factory.com',
'pio_pio@factory.c#om',
'pio_pio@factory.c*om',
'pio^_pio@factory.com'
]

for(const email of emails){
  document.write(email+' : '+validEmail(email)+'</br>');
}

2

If you get this error: Using regular expressions is security-sensitive.

Then here is what you are looking for. This solution is free from " Regular expression Denial of Service (ReDoS) "

Regex to validate emails without (ReDoS):

/^[a-z0-9](?!.*?[^\na-z0-9]{2})[^\s@]+@[^\s@]+\.[^\s@]+[a-z0-9]$/

Please let me know if this solution works for you. Thanks.

1

I know its not regex but any way...

This is example with node and npm package email-existence this is ultimate checking if email exist and if its in the right form :)

This will ping the email if its responding if it got no response it will return false or else true.

function doesEmailExist(email) {
    var emailExistence = require('email-existence');
    return emailExistence.check(email,function (err,status) {
            if (status) {
                return status;
            }
            else {
                throw new Error('Email does not exist');
            }
        });
}
1

If you want to use Jquery and want to have modern approach then use JQuery input mask with validation.

http://bseth99.github.io/projects/jquery-ui/5-jquery-masks.html

Demo on how simple jquery input mask is here: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/gpRyBp

Example of simple input mask for date forexample NOT full validation

 <input id="date" type="text" placeholder="YYYY-MM-DD"/>

and the script:

 $("#date").mask("9999-99-99",{placeholder:"YYYY-MM-DD"});
1

This regexp prevents duplicate domain names like abc@abc.com.com.com.com, it will allow only domain two time like abc@abc.co.in. It also does not allow statring from number like 123abc@abc.com

regexp: /^([a-zA-Z])+([a-zA-Z0-9_.+-])+\@(([a-zA-Z])+\.+?(com|co|in|org|net|edu|info|gov|vekomy))\.?(com|co|in|org|net|edu|info|gov)?$/,  

All The Best !!!!!

3
  • Why would you want to use something like this? The email address standards specification suggests that email addresses may begin with digits, and may contain multiple period characters in both the domain and lcoal part. This answer seems to be something you've created for some entirely custom scenario, where you effectively discriminate against people for having email addresses which you don't like! To extend slightly, email addresses could also contain IP addresses, so this is potentially even more restrictive than described.
    – XtrmJosh
    Nov 3 '15 at 13:24
  • True !!!!!!But different people can have different requirement and That is why we write validations....isn't it????????? Nov 4 '15 at 9:53
  • Well, not really. We use validation to confirm that input matches our expectations in order to avoid trying to use badly formatted data in certain ways. In this instance, OP is looking for code which can validate an email address, as it is intended to be. In your instance, you appear to be validating a string to be something which you want it to be. To put it simply, you are validating that a string matches something that you want it to match, which isn't an email address, while OP is looking validating that a string matches an email address. These are not the same things.
    – XtrmJosh
    Nov 5 '15 at 19:11
1

If you are using AngularJS, just add type="email" to the input element:

https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/input/input%5Bemail%5D

In case there is no input element, it can be created dynamically:

var isEmail = $compile('<input ng-model="m" type="email">')($rootScope.$new()).
    controller('ngModel').$validators["email"];

if (isEmail('email@gmail.com')) {
  console.log('valid');
} 
2
  • But what is this email parser function? Could you post it so that one can use it without angular?
    – Bergi
    Dec 15 '14 at 2:07
  • Yes, if you are going to post a black box answer please dig up the RegEx behind the email parser function and show us what it's using.. Aug 24 '15 at 2:09
1

I'd like to add a short note about non-ASCII characters. Rnevius's (and co.) solution is brilliant, but it allows to add Cyrillic, Japanese, Emoticons and other unicode symbols which may be restricted by some servers.

The code below will print true though it contains UTF-8 character Ё.

console.log (/^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/.test ('Ё@example.org'))

In my case all non-ASCII symbols are prohibited so I have modified the original expression to exclude all characters above U+007F:

/^(([^\u0080-\uffff<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^\u0080-\uffff<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/

Maybe this will help someone to prevent undesired behaviour.

1
  • Nah I think this is an unusual enough use case that it should be its own answer
    – jcollum
    Aug 13 '17 at 17:48
1
 <input type="email" class="form-control" required="required" placeholder="Email Address" name="Email" id="Email" autocomplete="Email">
 <button class="btn-1 shadow-0 full-width" type="button" id="register">Register account</button>

 $("#register").click(function(){       
    var rea = /^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?(?:\.[a-zA-Z0-9](?:[a-zA-Z0-9-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?)*$/;
    var Email = $("#Email").val();
    var x = rea.test(Email);
    if (!x) {
        alert('Type Your valid Email');
        return false;
    }           
 </script>
1

Here is a solution that works and includes validation/notification fuctionality in a form:

You can run it at this link

JAVASCRIPT

(function() {
  'use strict';

  window.addEventListener('load', function() {
    var form = document.getElementById('needs-validation');
    form.addEventListener('submit', function(event) {
      if (form.checkValidity() === false) {
        event.preventDefault();
      }
      form.classList.add('was-validated');
      event.preventDefault();              
    }, false);
  }, false);
})();

HTML

<p class='title'>
    <b>Email validation</b>
  <hr size="30px;">
</p>
<br>

<form id="needs-validation" novalidate>
  <p class='form_text'>Try it out!</p>
  <div class="form-row">
    <div class="col-12">
      <input type="email" class="form-control" placeholder="Email Address" required>
        <div class="invalid-feedback">
          Please enter a valid email address.
        </div>
    </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="col-12">
      <button type="submit" 
          class="btn btn-default btn-block">Sign up now
      </button>
    </div>
   </div>
</form>
1

I wrote a JavaScript email validator which is fully compatile with PHP's filter_var($value, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL) implementation.

https://github.com/mpyw/FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL.js

import validateEmail from 'filter-validate-email'

const value = '...'
const result = validateEmail(value)

is equivalent to:

<?php

$value = '...';
$result = (bool)filter_var($value, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL, FILTER_FLAG_EMAIL_UNICODE);
1

You cold use https://github.com/chriso/validator.js and simply do:

var validator = require('validator');

validator.isEmail('foo@bar.com'); //=> true

Note that this can work on the client.

1

Here's how I do it. I'm using match() to check for the standard email pattern and I'm adding a class to the input text to notify the user accordingly. Hope that helps!

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('#submit').on('click', function(){
      var email = $('#email').val();
      var pat = /^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/;
      if (email.match(pat)){
        $('#email')
          .addClass('input-valid');
        return false;
      } else {
        $('#email')
        	.addClass('input-error')
          .val('');
        return false;
      }
  });
});
.input-error {
  border: 1px solid red;
  color: red;
}

.input-valid {
  border: 1px solid green;
  color: green;
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<form>
    <input type="text" id="email" placeholder="name@service.xx" class="">
    <input type="submit" id="submit" value="Send"/>
</form>

1
1

If you want something a human can read and maintain, I would recommend Masala Parser (I'm one of the creators of it).

import {C,Streams} from '@masala/parser'

const illegalCharset = ' @\u00A0\n\t';
const extendedIllegalCharset = illegalCharset + '.';


// Assume 'nicolas@internal.masala.co.uk'
export function simpleEmail() {

    return C.charNotIn(illegalCharset).rep() // 'nicolas'
        .then(C.char('@'))
        .then(subDns())  //'internal.masala.co.'
        .then(C.charNotIn(extendedIllegalCharset).rep()) //'uk'
        .eos(); // Must be end of the char stream
}

// x@internal.masala.co.uk => extract 'internal.masala.co.'
function  subDns() {
    return C.charNotIn(extendedIllegalCharset).rep().then(C.char('.')).rep()
}

function validateEmail(email:string) {
    console.log(email + ': ' + (simpleEmail().parse(Streams.ofString(email)).isAccepted()));
}


validateEmail('nicolas@internal.masala.co.uk'); // True
validateEmail('nz@co.'); // False, trailing "."

If you want to accept the ultimate ugly email version, you can add in quotes in the first part:


function inQuote() {
    return C.char('"')
        .then(C.notChar('"').rep())
        .then(C.char('"'))
}

function allEmail() {

    return inQuote().or(C.charNotIn(illegalCharset))
        .rep() // repeat (inQuote or anyCharacter)
        .then(C.char('@'))
        .then(subDns())
        .then(C.charNotIn(extendedIllegalCharset).rep())
        .eos() // Must be end of the character stream
        // Create a structure
        .map(function (characters) { return ({ email: characters.join('') }); });
}

'"nicolas""love-quotes"@masala.co.uk' is officially valid, but should it be in your system?

At least with Masala, you give yourself a chance to understand it. And so for the next year, colleague.

1

These will work with the top used emails(they match exactly the rules of each one).

Gmail
/^[a-z]((?!\.\.)([a-z\.])){4,28}[a-z0-9]@gmail.com$/i

Yahoo
/^[a-z]((?!\.\.)([\w\.])){3,30}[\w]@yahoo.com$/i

Outlook/Hotmail
/[a-z]((?!\.\.)([\w\.])){0,62}[\w]@(outlook.com|hotmail.com)$/i

3
  • Do you know that \w already includes \d and _? Please, have a look at these sites: TLD list; valid/invalid addresses; regex for RFC822 email address
    – Toto
    Nov 18 '19 at 12:50
  • @Toto that's right, i don't know how i lost it there, i actually used this regex in my database handaling :\, thanks again.
    – Eboubaker
    Nov 21 '19 at 16:30
  • Gmail's domain is not @google.com, it's @gmail.com or (for very old accounts) @googlemail.com Jan 21 '20 at 17:36
1
     // Html form call function name at submit button

    <form name="form1" action="#"> 
    <input type='text' name='text1'/>
    <input type="submit" name="submit" value="Submit" 
    onclick="ValidateEmail(document.form1.text1)"/>
   </from>

    // Write the function name ValidateEmail below

    <script>
     function ValidateEmail(inputText)
    {
  var mailformat = /^[a-zA-Z0-9.!#$%&'*+/=?^_`{|}~-]+@[a-zA-Z0-9-]+(?:\.[a-zA-Z0-9-]+)*$/;
    if(inputText.value.match(mailformat))
    {
    alert("Valid email address!");
    document.form1.text1.focus();
    return true;
    }
    else
   {
    alert("You have entered an invalid email address!");
    document.form1.text1.focus();
    return false;
    }
    }
   </script>
1

Yet another perfect regexp for email validation

/^([^\s\@])+\@(([^\s\@\.])+\.)+([^\s\.]{2,})+$/

You can test it here https://regex101.com/r/FV3pUI/2

1

This works well for a simple email regex:

anythingExceptAtOrSpace@anythingExceptAtOrSpace.anythingExceptAtOrSpace

/^[^@ ]+@[^@ ]+\.[^@ ]+$/

To test:

const emailRegex = /^[^@ ]+@[^@ ]+\.[^@ ]+$/
const result1 = emailRegex.test('hello@there.com')
console.log(result1) // true
const result2 = emailRegex.test('hel@lo@there.com')
console.log(result2) // false

2
  • This doesn't match me@localhost (valid) but matches ...@... (invalid). Please, have a look at these sites: TLD list; valid/invalid addresses; regex for RFC822 email address
    – Toto
    Apr 18 at 8:15
  • Yeah this isn't meant to be a catch all solution but rather a human readable regex that works for most cases - basically a simple regex to filter out most the rubbish
    – danday74
    Apr 19 at 0:35
1
// Try this regular Expression by ES6 function

const emailValidate = (email) => {
  const regexp= /^[\w.%+-]+@[\w.-]+\.[\w]{2,6}$/;
  return regexp.test(email);
}
0

One of my coworker shared this regex with me. I like it a lot.

function isValidEmailAddress (email) {
    var validEmail = false;
    if (email) {
        email = email.trim().toLowerCase();
        var pattern = /^[\w-']+(\.[\w-']+)*@([a-zA-Z0-9]+[a-zA-Z0-9-]+(\.[a-zA-Z0-9-]+)*?\.[a-zA-Z]{2,6}|(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3})(:\d{4})?$/;
        validEmail = pattern.exec(email);
    }

    return validEmail;
}

if (typeof String.prototype.trim !== 'function') {
    String.prototype.trim = function() {
        return this.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g, '');
    };
}
0
0
\b[a-z][\w\d_\.]+@\w+\.[a-z]{2}[a-z]?\.?[a-z]{,2}\s

It allows:

abcxyz123@qwert.com    
abc123xyz@asdf.co.in   
abc1_xyz1@gmail1.com   
abc.xyz@gmail.com.in
1
  • Nice try: 2 updates here: For match ranges, we provide {min,max}. A blank min is error, but can have a blank max. I mean [a-z]{,2} is wrong, write as {0,2}. Moreover: your regex shows kamal@_gmail.com as valid which is not! Mar 14 '16 at 10:46
0

If you define your regular expression as a string then all backslashes need to be escaped, so instead of '\w' you should have '\w'.

Alternatively, define it as a regular expression:

var pattern = /^\w+@[a-zA-Z_]+?\.[a-zA-Z]{2,3}$/; 
0

Now ReactNative Version 0.46 Use Below code for email Validation.

 validateEmail = (email) => {
     var re = /^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/;
     if (re.test(email)) {
     } else {
       alert('email: ' + "Please enter valid emailID.")
     }
 }
0

I am using this function

/**
 * @param {*} email
 */
export const validateEmail = email => {
    return new RegExp(/[\w-]+@([\w-]+\.)+[\w-]+/gm).test(email);
};
1
  • Doesn't work for Unicode. validateEmail('køkø@gmail.com') === false. Forget validation using checks like this. Test for @ and just send the user an email.
    – oligofren
    Sep 24 '19 at 9:36
0

There is my version of an email validator. This code is done with object-oriented programming and realized as a class with static methods. You will find two versions of the validators: strict(EmailValidator.validate) and kind(EmailValidator.validateKind).

The first throws an error if an email is invalid and returns email otherwise. The second returns Boolean value that says if an email is valid. I prefer the strict version in most of the cases.

export class EmailValidator {
    /**
     * @param {string} email
     * @return {string}
     * @throws {Error}
     */
    static validate(email) {
        email = this.prepareEmail(email);

        const isValid = this.validateKind(email);

        if (isValid)
            return email;

        throw new Error(`Got invalid email: ${email}.`);
    }

    /**
     * @param {string} email
     * @return {boolean}
     */
    static validateKind(email) {
        email = this.prepareEmail(email);

        const regex = this.getRegex();

        return regex.test(email);
    }

    /**
     * @return {RegExp}
     * @private
     */
    static getRegex() {
        return /^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/;
    }

    /**
     * @param {string} email
     * @return {string}
     * @private
     */
    static prepareEmail(email) {
        return String(email).toLowerCase();
    }
}

To validate an email you can follow these ways:

// First way.

try {
    EmailValidator.validate('balovbohdan@gmail.com');
} catch (e) {
    console.error(e.message);
}
// Second way.

const email = 'balovbohdan@gmail.com';
const isValid = EmailValidator.validateKind(email);

if (isValid)
    console.log(`Email is valid: ${email}.`);
else
    console.log(`Email is invalid: ${email}.`);
0

for email validation you can create your custom function and use regex syntax for validate email:

function validateEmail(email){
        var reg = /^([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\@([A-Za-z0-9_\-\.])+\.([A-Za-z]{2,4})$/;

       //your custom code here to check your email address 

}
1
0

Fully equivalent to PHP's filter_var() with FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL implementation:

-1
function ValidateEmail(mail) 
{
  if (/^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(myForm.emailAddr.value))
  {
    return (true)
  }
  alert("You have entered an invalid email address!")
  return (false)
}

Ref URL: https://www.w3resource.com/javascript/form/email-validation.php

-1

This works for me:

function Email(mail)
{
 if (/^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(myForm.emailAddr.value))
  {
    return (true)
  }
    alert("Invalid email address!")
    return (false)
}

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