3826

How can an email address be validated in JavaScript?

  • 18
  • 46
    please get this right, too many website don't like my email address of "firstName@secondName.name", not all top level domains end it 2 or 3 letters. – Ian Ringrose Aug 19 '11 at 14:51
  • 1
    Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/11111332/… – elemjay19 Jun 20 '12 at 17:54
  • 28
    Any support for use of regex checks for e-mails I am 100% against. I'm tired of being told my e-mail address of "foo+bar@gmail.com" is invalid. The best option is to ask the user to type their e-mail in twice and if you MUST use a regex checker, then tell the user that their e-mail address does not appear to be valid and ask if they are sure they typed it right. Even go so far as to point out WHAT did not check out in the regexp check, but do NOT stop them from submitting the form. – Soundfx4 Mar 15 '16 at 16:21
  • 8
    @Soundfx4: this should be THE answer, and accepted as such. Testing for the correctness of an address is a dumb thing to do - the best way to have customers frustrated. I request the address to be typed twice and hint that there are some possible issues (missing @, ;com, etc.) and let the user correct them if they wish (and accept whatever they send me) – WoJ Apr 4 '17 at 17:24

83 Answers 83

0

One of my coworker shared this regex with me. I like it a lot.

function isValidEmailAddress (email) {
    var validEmail = false;
    if (email) {
        email = email.trim().toLowerCase();
        var pattern = /^[\w-']+(\.[\w-']+)*@([a-zA-Z0-9]+[a-zA-Z0-9-]+(\.[a-zA-Z0-9-]+)*?\.[a-zA-Z]{2,6}|(\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3})(:\d{4})?$/;
        validEmail = pattern.exec(email);
    }

    return validEmail;
}

if (typeof String.prototype.trim !== 'function') {
    String.prototype.trim = function() {
        return this.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g, '');
    };
}
0
\b[a-z][\w\d_\.]+@\w+\.[a-z]{2}[a-z]?\.?[a-z]{,2}\s

It allows:

abcxyz123@qwert.com    
abc123xyz@asdf.co.in   
abc1_xyz1@gmail1.com   
abc.xyz@gmail.com.in
  • Nice try: 2 updates here: For match ranges, we provide {min,max}. A blank min is error, but can have a blank max. I mean [a-z]{,2} is wrong, write as {0,2}. Moreover: your regex shows kamal@_gmail.com as valid which is not! – Kamal Nayan Mar 14 '16 at 10:46
0

If you define your regular expression as a string then all backslashes need to be escaped, so instead of '\w' you should have '\w'.

Alternatively, define it as a regular expression:

var pattern = /^\w+@[a-zA-Z_]+?\.[a-zA-Z]{2,3}$/; 
0

I'd like to add a short note about non-ASCII characters. Rnevius's (and co.) solution is brilliant, but it allows to add Cyrillic, Japanese, Emoticons and other unicode symbols which may be restricted by some servers.

The code below will print true though it contains UTF-8 character Ё.

console.log (/^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/.test ('Ё@example.org'))

In my case all non-ASCII symbols are prohibited so I have modified the original expression to exclude all characters above U+007F:

/^(([^\u0080-\uffff<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^\u0080-\uffff<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/

Maybe this will help someone to prevent undesired behaviour.

  • Maybe you should have edited the mentioned answer. – Markus Jun 2 '17 at 8:19
  • Nah I think this is an unusual enough use case that it should be its own answer – jcollum Aug 13 '17 at 17:48
0

ES6 sample

const validateEmail=(email)=> /^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/.test(email);
0

Here is a solution that works and includes validation/notification fuctionality in a form:

You can run it at this link

JAVASCRIPT

(function() {
  'use strict';

  window.addEventListener('load', function() {
    var form = document.getElementById('needs-validation');
    form.addEventListener('submit', function(event) {
      if (form.checkValidity() === false) {
        event.preventDefault();
      }
      form.classList.add('was-validated');
      event.preventDefault();              
    }, false);
  }, false);
})();

HTML

<p class='title'>
    <b>Email validation</b>
  <hr size="30px;">
</p>
<br>

<form id="needs-validation" novalidate>
  <p class='form_text'>Try it out!</p>
  <div class="form-row">
    <div class="col-12">
      <input type="email" class="form-control" placeholder="Email Address" required>
        <div class="invalid-feedback">
          Please enter a valid email address.
        </div>
    </div>
  <div class="row">
    <div class="col-12">
      <button type="submit" 
          class="btn btn-default btn-block">Sign up now
      </button>
    </div>
   </div>
</form>
0

I wrote a JavaScript email validator which is fully compatile with PHP's filter_var($value, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL) implementation.

https://github.com/mpyw/FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL.js

import validateEmail from 'filter-validate-email'

const value = '...'
const result = validateEmail(value)

is equivalent to:

<?php

$value = '...';
$result = (bool)filter_var($value, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL, FILTER_FLAG_EMAIL_UNICODE);
0
function ValidateEmail(mail) 
{
  if (/^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(myForm.emailAddr.value))
  {
    return (true)
  }
  alert("You have entered an invalid email address!")
  return (false)
}

Ref URL: https://www.w3resource.com/javascript/form/email-validation.php

0

This works for me:

function Email(mail)
{
 if (/^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(myForm.emailAddr.value))
  {
    return (true)
  }
    alert("Invalid email address!")
    return (false)
}
0

The personal_info part contains the following ASCII characters.

  1. Uppercase (A-Z) and lowercase (a-z) English letters. Digits (0-9).
  2. Characters ! # $ % & ' * + - / = ? ^ _ ` { | } ~
  3. Character . ( period, dot or fullstop) provided that it is not the first or last character and it will not come one after the other.

The domain name [for example com, org, net, in, us, info] part contains letters, digits, hyphens, and dots.

 function ValidateEmail(mail) 
{
 if (/^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(myForm.emailAddr.value))
  {
    return (true)
  }
    alert("You have entered an invalid email address!")
    return (false)
}
0

you could also use the New Regex class and make this way:

const validaEmail = function validateEmail(str) { let regex = new RegExp(/([\w\.\-_]+)?\w+@[\w-_]+(\.\w+){1,}/,'igm') return regex.test(str); }

reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/Regular_Expressions

0

You cold use https://github.com/chriso/validator.js and simply do:

var validator = require('validator');

validator.isEmail('foo@bar.com'); //=> true

Note that this can work on the client.

0

There is my version of email validator. This code is OOP-oriented and realized as class with static methods. You will find two versions of validators: strict(EmailValidator.validate) and kind(EmailValidator.validateKind). First throws error if email is invalid and returns email otherwise. Second returns boolean value that says if email is valid. I prefer strict version in most of cases.

export class EmailValidator {
    /**
     * @param {string} email
     * @return {string}
     * @throws {Error}
     */
    static validate(email) {
        email = this.prepareEmail(email);

        const isValid = this.validateKind(email);

        if (isValid)
            return email;

        throw new Error(`Got invalid email: ${email}.`);
    }

    /**
     * @param {string} email
     * @return {boolean}
     */
    static validateKind(email) {
        email = this.prepareEmail(email);

        const regex = this.getRegex();

        return regex.test(email);
    }

    /**
     * @return {RegExp}
     * @private
     */
    static getRegex() {
        return /^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/;
    }

    /**
     * @param {string} email
     * @return {string}
     * @private
     */
    static prepareEmail(email) {
        return String(email).toLowerCase();
    }
}

To validate email you can follow these ways:

// First way.

try {
    EmailValidator.validate('balovbohdan@gmail.com');
} catch (e) {
    console.error(e.message);
}
// Second way.

const email = 'balovbohdan@gmail.com';
const isValid = EmailValidator.validateKind(email);

if (isValid)
    console.log(`Email is valid: ${email}.`);
else
    console.log(`Email is invalid: ${email}.`);
0

I am using this function

/**
 * @param {*} email
 */
export const validateEmail = email => {
    return new RegExp(/[\w-]+@([\w-]+\.)+[\w-]+/gm).test(email);
};
0

General Email Regex (RFC 5322 Official Standard): https://emailregex.com/

JS:

/^(([^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\\.,;:\s@"]+)*)|(".+"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/
0

If you want something human can read and maintain, I would recommand Masala Parser (I'm one of the creators of it).

import {C,Streams} from '@masala/parser'

const illegalCharset = ' @\u00A0\n\t';
const extendedIllegalCharset = illegalCharset+'.';


// assume 'nicolas@internal.masala.co.uk'
export function simpleEmail() {

    return C.charNotIn(illegalCharset).rep() // 'nicolas'
        .then(C.char('@'))
        .then(subDns())  //'internal.masala.co.'
        .then(C.charNotIn(extendedIllegalCharset).rep()) //'uk'
        .eos(); // must be end of the char stream  
}

// x@internal.masala.co.uk => extract 'internal.masala.co.'
function  subDns(){
    return C.charNotIn(extendedIllegalCharset).rep().then(C.char('.')).rep()
}

function validateEmail(email:string){
    console.log(email+': '+ (simpleEmail().parse(Streams.ofString(email)).isAccepted()));
}


validateEmail('nicolas@internal.masala.co.uk');  // true
validateEmail('nz@co.');// false, trailing .

If you want to accept the ultimate ugly email version, you can add in quote first part


function inQuote(){
    return C.char('"')
        .then(C.notChar('"').rep())
        .then(C.char('"'))
}

function allEmail() {

    return inQuote().or(C.charNotIn(illegalCharset))
        .rep()// repeat(inQuote or anyCharacter)
        .then(C.char('@'))
        .then(subDns())
        .then(C.charNotIn(extendedIllegalCharset).rep())
        .eos() // must end of the char stream
        // create a structure
        .map(function (characters) { return ({ email: characters.join('') }); });
}

'"nicolas""love-quotes"@masala.co.uk' is officially valid, but should it be in your system ?

At least with Masala, you give yourself a chance to understand it. And so for the next year colleague.

-3

Very simple in JavaScript. follow this code.

function validate(){
    var email = document.getElementById('Email');
    var filter = /^([a-zA-Z0-9_\.\-])+\@(([a-zA-Z0-9\-])+\.)+([a-zA-Z0-9]{2,4})+$/;

    if (!filter.test(email.value))
    {
        alert('Please Enter the valid email address');
        email.focus;
        return false;
    }
    else
{
        return true;
    }

HTML code for this:

form name="form"
     enctype="multipart/form-data"
     name="form"
     action="register.php"
     method="POST" onsubmit="return validate();" >
    <input type="text" placeholder="Enter ur Email Id" id="Email" name="Email" />
    <input type="submit" id="submit" value="save" name="Like" class="button" />
</form>
-3

Simple regex for email-Id

 String EMAIL_PATTERN ="^(([^<>()\[\]\.,;:\s@\"]+(\.[^<>()\[\]\.,;:\s@\"]+)*)|(\".+\"))@(([^<>()[\]\.,;:\s@\"]+\.)+[^<>()[\]\.,;:\s@\"]{2,})$";
  • 2
    According to your regex "_..............kamal@gmail.com" is valid, which should not be! – Kamal Nayan Mar 14 '16 at 10:38
-4
function validatecontactEmail(email) { 

 if (/^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(email))  
  {  
    return (true)  
  }  

    return (false)  

}
  • 5
    How about just return /^\w+([\.-]?\w+)*@\w+([\.-]?\w+)*(\.\w{2,3})+$/.test(email)? – Michael Schilling Nov 14 '14 at 3:24
  • @MichaelSchilling that decreases readability. – joey rohan Mar 6 '15 at 15:42
-5

Following regular expression:

/^([\w]+)(.[\w]+)*@([\w]+)(.[\w]{2,3}){1,2}$/;
  • That does not match the RFC. – tchrist Jul 14 '13 at 18:35
-5

Validation regex for email:

var rex_email = /^(([^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@\"]+(\.[^<>()[\]\\.,;:\s@\"]+)*)|(\".+\"))@((\[[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\])|(([a-zA-Z\-0-9]+\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,}))$/;

if(email=="") {
    window.plugins.toast.showShortBottom( "Please enter the details. ", function(a) {
        console.log('toast success: ' + a);
    }, function(b) { });
} else if(!rex_email.test(email)) {
    window.plugins.toast.showShortBottom( "Please enter the valid email id. ", function(a) {
        console.log('toast success: ' + a);
    }, function(b) { });
}
  • Its working fine for my code and the regex is absolutely right.. – Anil Singhania Jan 21 '15 at 0:27
  • 2
    This will work for very common, basic email addresses, but there are certain edge cases where this will reject valid email addresses. If you've read the other 36(!) answers on here, you would have known that by now. – Qantas 94 Heavy Feb 7 '15 at 0:12
-6
function validateEmail(elementValue){        
    var emailPattern = /^[a-zA-Z0-9._]+[a-zA-Z0-9]+@[a-zA-Z0-9]+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,4}$/;  
    return emailPattern.test(elementValue);   
  }   

It returns true if the email address is valid. Otherwise, it will return false.

-6

W3Schools gives a good simple and efficient script to validate an email:

function validateEmail(email) {
    var atpos=email.indexOf("@");
    var dotpos=email.lastIndexOf(".");
    if (atpos < 1 || dotpos < atpos+2 || dotpos+2 >= email.length) {
        alert("Not a valid e-mail address");
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Note that you will have to remove spaces if there are any though, with something like this:

.replace(/ /g,'')

Source: JavaScript Form Validation

  • 4
    abc@xyz is a perfectly valid email that is not recognise by your regex. – Toto Nov 29 '13 at 12:31
  • It is not my regex, it's w3schools regex, and for a simple email validation, provided you would rather be too restrictive than not enough, it just works. If you want the full package use voyager's solution. – Calahad Dec 2 '13 at 23:46
  • Quite horrible though, it will validate lots of incorrect emails, i.e. something like d@@.com will be valid. – Mads Mogenshøj Jun 21 '14 at 19:43

protected by Alan Moore Mar 2 '11 at 11:31

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