53

I'm trying to do something that used to be really easy before the start attribute on ol tags was deprecated. I'd just like to have a pair of ordered lists in my page, but start the numbering of the second list where the first one finished. Something like:

1. do stuff
2. do stuff

Here's a paragraph

3. do stuff

I've seen that the counter-reset and counter-increment CSS properties should be able to achieve this, but I can't get it working. Here's my code so far:

<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    ol li { counter-increment: mycounter; }
    ol.start { counter-reset: mycounter; }
    ol.continue { counter-reset: mycounter 2; }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <ol class="start">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
  <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
  <ol class="continue">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
</body>
</html>

To be honest, even if that worked, it wouldn't be ideal. I don't want to have to specify the number reached by the first list in my ol.continue selector.

What am I doing wrong? What's the minimal HTML/CSS combination required to achieve the desired effect?

1
  • I tried this solution. However, I noticed numbers restarted and then being overlapped with the continued nos. Hence, I used Horst Gutmanns approach which resulted in smooth rendering.
    – SO User
    Dec 22 '14 at 2:58

10 Answers 10

34

A much easier solution to the OP's problem is the following:

<ol start="X">

Where X is the value of the list you want to continue, so in his sample:

<ol>
  <li>You can't touch this</li>
  <li>You can't touch this</li>
</ol>
<p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
<ol start="3">
  <li>You can't touch this</li>
</ol>

1
  • 5
    It's easy to use, but if I add some <li> to the top of the list, I would have to go through all the start attributes that follow and change the value. In other words, it's not automatic, and off by one's are a major time sink for me.
    – 1934286
    Sep 18 '18 at 18:59
23

As already said, you need :before and content, but you also need to disable the default list numbering. This is your fixed CSS:

ol.start { 
    counter-reset: mycounter; 
}
ol.start li, ol.continue li {
    list-style: none;
}
ol.start li:before, ol.continue li:before { 
    content: counter(mycounter) ". "; 
    counter-increment: mycounter;
}

You don't need to reset the counter for ol.continue, just continue to use your custom counter. The above code makes sure that the counter is only used for the ol.start and ol.continue lists.

3
  • Close, but this breaks the list's hanging indent. I'm sure I can fix that, but I'm off into a meeting now and suspect someone else might get there before me... :)
    – Mal Ross
    Jan 6 '11 at 14:00
  • @Mal Ross: Yep, I know it breaks the indent, you would have to adjust it. There is no way to just replace the automatic number. Jan 6 '11 at 14:02
  • great, but how could I get the text in the paragraph to be vertically aligned? with this the second line of a li is right beneath the number, while with normal li the second line starts below the text of the first line
    – Don Giulio
    Jun 11 '20 at 10:23
8

The start attribute is valid in html5. I would just use that.

http://w3c.github.io/html/grouping-content.html#the-ol-element

Also http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#the-ol-element States that it is still supported in all browsers. You would have to test to be sure I guess.

some jquery to set the start attribute dynamically if you are into that sort of thing..

  // assuming all your ol's have the class mylist
  $(function(){
    var counter=1;
    $('ol.mylist').each(function(){
      $this = $(this);
      $this.attr('start',counter);
      counter += $(this).find('li').length;
    });
  });
6
  • Thanks for the tip, but wouldn't it restrict this part of my site's content to working in only the more recent versions of various browsers? Also, from my reading of it, it means I have to hard-code the starting number for the follow-on list, which is something I'd prefer to avoid.
    – Mal Ross
    Jan 6 '11 at 14:51
  • If you have two lists you will either have to hard code the start of the second or use script to change the numbering. What about using jquery to update the start attribute?
    – Lee
    Jan 6 '11 at 15:06
  • w3.org says start is still supported in all major browsers. Don't know how reliable that is since it also still says it's deprecated.
    – Lee
    Jan 6 '11 at 15:21
  • Thanks for the extra jQuery option. Were it not for my (current) lack of experience with jQuery, I might adopt that as my solution, but given that it's possible to use the counter attributes in CSS without hard-coding the continuation number, I'm going to go with that. Thanks for your input, though - it'll give others reading this question another good option. :)
    – Mal Ross
    Jan 6 '11 at 15:51
  • w3schools also notes that it IS supported in html5.
    – doubleJ
    Jul 31 '12 at 21:18
3

Can you not just nest the paragraph inside the list item before you close it?

  <ol>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this
      <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
      </li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>

2

The Opera DevNet has a nice example for exactly this use-case available here: http://devfiles.myopera.com/articles/501/counters-start-example.html (which is part of their article about counters)

So your code should look somehow like this:

<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    ol li { counter-increment: mycounter; }
    ol.start { counter-reset: mycounter; }
    ol.continue { /*counter-reset: mycounter 2; */}
    ol li { 
        counter-increment: mycounter;
        list-style-type: none;
    }
    ol li:before { content: counter(mycounter) ". "; }
  </style>
</head>

<body>
  <ol class="start">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
  <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
  <ol class="continue">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
</body>
</html>

But, as Lee mentioned, ol@start seems no longer again deprecated, I'd personally prefer that approach since this is not only a styling but also an issue of semantics in your markup.

2
  • Numbering of subsequent <ol> was not correct due to ol.continue. There is no need to reset the counter in continue
    – SO User
    Dec 22 '14 at 4:31
  • 2
    This works well except when the <ol>s are not siblings, in which case the numbering restarts. The solution is to put counter-reset: mycounter; on a common ancestor element e.g. <body> which will make your named variable available to all its descendants. If you don't won't to pollute your whole document put the rule on the highest common ancestor (in this case still <body>!)
    – CJ Dennis
    Apr 18 '15 at 17:59
0

you also need to use a :before rule with a content tag that references the counter:

see here: http://www.w3schools.com/css/pr_gen_counter-reset.asp

2
  • 3
    This answer would be even better if you fixed the code snippet from the question.
    – Cody Gray
    Jan 6 '11 at 13:50
  • You are right but i really think people should work a little on their problems today in order to be able to avoid them in the future. I will try to nudge someone in the right direction if i can thou. Jan 6 '11 at 13:59
0

Here is an different version of the answer that the OP devised. It makes the text line up if you have more than 9 list items. The pattern could be extended to more than 99 items, more than 999 items, etc.

ol.split { list-style-type: none; }
ol.split li.less-than-ten:before {
    counter-increment: mycounter;
    content: counter(mycounter) ".\00A0\00A0\00A0\00A0";
}

ol.split li.ten-or-greater:before {
    counter-increment: mycounter;
    content: counter(mycounter) ".\00A0\00A0";
}
ol.split li {
    display: list-item;
    text-indent: -2em;
}

ol.start { counter-reset: mycounter; }

To use this put the classes "start" and "split" on the first ol. Put the class "split" on subsequent ol's that you want to include in the continuous numbering. On the 1st through the 9th li tags, put the class "less-than-ten". On the 10th through 99th li tags, put the class "ten-or-greater". If you want to apply the pattern to the 100th through 999th li tags, you will have to create something like this:

ol.split li.more-than-99:before {
    counter-increment: mycounter;
    content: counter(mycounter) ".\00A0\00A0\00A0\00A0\00A0\00A0";
}

I believe the 6 "\00A0" tags will be enough. You may have to fiddle with the number of "\00A0" tags and the text-indent number to make all the text line up.

0

There is another approach that I've stumbled across when trying to answer my own question (Remove indent for element within an ordered list <ol>).

I should note that the discussion here helped me answer my question there, although they are different questions they have similar answers; so, thank you to those contributing to the discussion on this thread for your help.

My solution, instead of attributing classes to the list parts of the HTML, attributes a class to the element which is breaking the <ol> elements in two. I used the class name mid-ol. The combination of ol + .mid-ol + ol can then be used in the CSS.

To me this was more satisfactory than changing the character of the <ol> elements, as the list may exist and persist despite the breaking element. For example, the breaking element might be moved, removed, etc., but there's then little maintenance required for the <ol>.

To not duplicate discussion in two places, I'll let anyone interested peruse the discussion and example code on the other thread.

0

A similar thing can be achieved using the li tag's value attribute and non-marked list elements.

https://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_li_value.asp

In this approach the insert text becomes an unmarked list item. This is not idiomatic and would make some list-specific defaults about margins and alignment and what not. However this idiomatically keeps the "sparse" list a single tag. Whether this makes the solution better or worse than actually using TWO lists and simulating single list using the ol tag's start attribute - is up to reader to decide.

  <ol>
    <li>You can't touch this
    <li>You can't touch this
    
    <li style="list-style: none"><b>STOP!</b> Hammer time.
      
    <li value="3">You can't touch this
    <li>This neither
  </ol>

You can also add vertical outlines using <br/> or <p> or CSS, same for any other added visual cues.

Example with CSS:

  <ol>
    <li>You can't touch this
    <li>You can't touch this
    
    <li style="list-style: none; margin-top:10px; margin-bottom: 10px"><b>STOP!</b> Hammer time.
      
    <li value="3">You can't touch this
    <li>This neither
  </ol>

Example with HTML tags:

  <ol>
    <li>You can't touch this
    <li>You can't touch this
    
    <li style="list-style: none"><hr/><b>STOP!</b> Hammer time.<hr/>
      
    <li value="3">You can't touch this
    <li>This neither
  </ol>

-1

Today you can use the native start attribute - check it here https://www.w3schools.com/tags/att_ol_start.asp

<ol class="start" start="1">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol>
  <p>STOP! Hammer time.</p>
  <ol class="continue" start="3">
    <li>You can't touch this</li>
  </ol> 
1
  • This appears to just repeat Morkatog's answer from 2017.
    – TylerH
    Apr 28 at 13:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.