25

This code is just for illustrating the question.

#include <functional>
struct MyCallBack {
    void Fire() {
    }
};

int main()
{
    MyCallBack cb;
    std::function<void(void)> func = std::bind(&MyCallBack::Fire, &cb);
}

Experiments with valgrind shows that the line assigning to func dynamically allocates about 24 bytes with gcc 7.1.1 on linux.

In the real code, I have a few handfuls of different structs all with a void(void) member function that gets stored in ~10 million std::function<void(void)>.

Is there any way I can avoid memory being dynamically allocated when doing std::function<void(void)> func = std::bind(&MyCallBack::Fire, &cb); ? (Or otherwise assigning these member function to a std::function)

  • 6
    @BeyelerStudios, allocator support for functions has been dropped from 2017 C++. – SergeyA Sep 11 '17 at 20:13
  • @BeyelerStudios Forcing lambdas is a good thing. – user0042 Sep 11 '17 at 20:20
  • 1
    @BeyelerStudios Type erasure always has a runtime cost. If you want to avoid it, you can rewrite the function that consumes the std::function to be a template that takes an arbitrary callable type instead. This tradeoff between compile-time work and run-time work has always existed in C++. – Brian Sep 11 '17 at 20:20
  • 1
    Even beyond this specific case, where the given answer is correct, should just be avoiding bind almost entirely in C++14 and beyond. There's probably some corner case where it may still be ok, but in 99.9% of cases you should be using a lambda. – Nir Friedman Sep 11 '17 at 20:22
  • 1
    The thing is, even with proposed solution of using a lambda that solves the immediate problem,the lambda/std::function is still storing a pointer to the struct, so the data will still be out-of-line. So if you have say a vector<function<void(void)>>, you will still trigger cache misses like crazy and have poor performance. You'll just have a single indirection instead of double indirection. If your various structs are all of similar sizes you can do much, much, better. Are they? And how many do you have? – Nir Friedman Sep 11 '17 at 22:20
21

Unfortunately, allocators for std::function has been dropped in C++17.

Now the accepted solution to avoid dynamic allocations inside std::function is to use lambdas instead of std::bind. That does work, at least in GCC - it has enough static space to store the lambda in your case, but not enough space to store the binder object.

std::function<void()> func = [&cb]{ cb.Fire(); };
    // sizeof lambda is sizeof(MyCallBack*), which is small enough

As a general rule, with most implementations, and with a lambda which captures only a single pointer (or a reference), you will avoid dynamic allocations inside std::function with this technique (it is also generally better approach as other answer suggests).

Keep in mind, for that to work you need guarantee that this lambda will outlive the std::function. Obviously, it is not always possible, and sometime you have to capture state by (large) copy. If that happens, there is no way currently to eliminate dynamic allocations in functions, other than tinker with STL yourself (obviously, not recommended in general case, but could be done in some specific cases).

  • 9
    This is because std::function has an optimization that allocates the memory inside the object on the stack, provided that the function object has a small enough size. Using a lambda here will result in an object that is the size of one pointer, which should trigger the Small Function Optimization and allocate it within the std::function – Justin Sep 11 '17 at 20:17
  • 2
    I'm not sure about the relevance of this answer. Yes, allocator support has been dropped. But that does not mean that std::function is prohibited from dynamically allocating memory using the default mechanism. "Dropping allocator support" simply means that you won't be able to customize the allocator. So, how is this answer relevant to the question? – AnT Sep 11 '17 at 21:00
  • 3
    @AnT, hm... My answer explicitly prescribes how OP can achieve their goal (get an std::function<> which doesn't allocate on GCC) and why there is no other way. How is that not relevant? – SergeyA Sep 11 '17 at 21:12
  • 4
    function's dropping of allocator "support" in C++17 wasn't "unfortunate"; it was extremely fortunate, because it'll save anyone from trying to use it and finding out that no library vendor ever implemented it (because it's impossible). Kind of like how C++11 dropped "support" for export templates. :) – Quuxplusone Sep 11 '17 at 22:58
  • 3
    The OP might also be interested in a third-party replacement for std::function whose memory usage can be guaranteed (as opposed to dynamically allocating at a threshold that differs between libc++ and libstdc++). The keyword to search for is inplace_function, as in sg14::inplace_function<void(), 24>. Then if you discover you need to store an even bigger lambda and still don't want to heap-allocate, you can just bump that template parameter from 24 to 40 or whatever, and recompile. – Quuxplusone Sep 11 '17 at 23:02
6

As an addendum to the already existent and correct answer, consider the following:

MyCallBack cb;
std::cerr << sizeof(std::bind(&MyCallBack::Fire, &cb)) << "\n";
auto a = [&] { cb.Fire(); };
std::cerr << sizeof(a);

This program prints 24 and 8 for me, with both gcc and clang. I don't exactly know what bind is doing here (my understanding is that it's a fantastically complicated beast), but as you can see, it's almost absurdly inefficient here compared to a lambda.

As it happens, std::function is guaranteed to not allocate if constructed from a function pointer, which is also one word in size. So constructing a std::function from this kind of lambda, which only needs to capture a pointer to an object and should also be one word, should in practice never allocate.

  • 4
    I would expect bind to store pointer to member - 16 bytes + pointer to object - 8 bytes. Here you have your 24. – SergeyA Sep 11 '17 at 20:37
  • Looks like the state of the lambda capture is comprised of a reference to cb only. Hence, 8 bytes. – Maxim Egorushkin Sep 11 '17 at 20:45
  • @SergeyA Ah, I forget that pointer to member are 16 bytes, that's why I had trouble accounting for 24. I hate just about everything about pointers to members. – Nir Friedman Sep 11 '17 at 20:57
  • 1
    I don't think the fact that the lambda object has the same size as a function pointer is relevant. If you construct your std::function from a pointer, then it only needs that 8 byte of internal state. If you create it from a lambda, the object has to store a copy of the lambda AND a function pointer (due to type Erasure). That being said, your statement that most implementations will not make an allocations for such small objects is true. – MikeMB Sep 12 '17 at 4:34
  • 1
    @MikeMB: When I last checked the libstdc++ implementation of string, which also has a "short string optimization", sizeof(string) was 24 bytes, but only 15 (+trailing NUL) could be stored inline (even though folly manages to store 23+NUL inline). So sizeof is indeed an upper bound, and unlikely to be met. – Matthieu M. Sep 12 '17 at 10:30
2

Many std::function implementations will avoid allocations and use space inside the function class itself rather than allocating if the callback it wraps is "small enough" and has trivial copying. However, the standard does not require this, only suggests it.

On g++, a non-trivial copy constructor on a function object, or data exceeding 16 bytes, is enough to cause it to allocate. But if your function object has no data and uses the builtin copy constructor, then std::function won't allocate. Also, if you use a function pointer or a member function pointer, it won't allocate.

While not directly part of your question, it is part of your example. Do not use std::bind. In virtually every case, a lambda is better: smaller, better inlining, can avoid allocations, better error messages, faster compiles, the list goes on. If you want to avoid allocations, you must also avoid bind.

1

I propose a custom class for your specific usage.

While it's true that you shouldn't try to re-implement existing library functionality because the library ones will be much more tested and optimized, it's also true that it applies for the general case. If you have a particular situation like in your example and the standard implementation doesn't suite your needs you can explore implementing a version tailored to your specific use case, which you can measure and tweak as necessary.

So I have created a class akin to std::function<void (void)> that works only for methods and has all the storage in place (no dynamic allocations).

I have lovingly called it Trigger (inspired by your Fire method name). Please do give it a more suited name if you want to.

// helper alias for method
// can be used in user code
template <class T>
using Trigger_method = auto (T::*)() -> void;

namespace detail
{

// Polymorphic classes needed for type erasure
struct Trigger_base
{
    virtual ~Trigger_base() noexcept = default;
    virtual auto placement_clone(void* buffer) const noexcept -> Trigger_base* = 0;

    virtual auto call() -> void = 0;
};

template <class T>
struct Trigger_actual : Trigger_base
{
    T& obj;
    Trigger_method<T> method;

    Trigger_actual(T& obj, Trigger_method<T> method) noexcept : obj{obj}, method{method}
    {
    }

    auto placement_clone(void* buffer) const noexcept -> Trigger_base* override
    {
        return new (buffer) Trigger_actual{obj, method};
    }

    auto call() -> void override
    {
        return (obj.*method)();
    }
};

// in Trigger (bellow) we need to allocate enough storage
// for any Trigger_actual template instantiation
// since all templates basically contain 2 pointers
// we assume (and test it with static_asserts)
// that all will have the same size
// we will use Trigger_actual<Trigger_test_size>
// to determine the size of all Trigger_actual templates
struct Trigger_test_size {};

}
struct Trigger
{
    std::aligned_storage_t<sizeof(detail::Trigger_actual<detail::Trigger_test_size>)>
        trigger_actual_storage_;

    // vital. We cannot just cast `&trigger_actual_storage_` to `Trigger_base*`
    // because there is no guarantee by the standard that
    // the base pointer will point to the start of the derived object
    // so we need to store separately  the base pointer
    detail::Trigger_base* base_ptr = nullptr;

    template <class X>
    Trigger(X& x, Trigger_method<X> method) noexcept
    {
        static_assert(sizeof(trigger_actual_storage_) >= 
                         sizeof(detail::Trigger_actual<X>));
        static_assert(alignof(decltype(trigger_actual_storage_)) %
                         alignof(detail::Trigger_actual<X>) == 0);

        base_ptr = new (&trigger_actual_storage_) detail::Trigger_actual<X>{x, method};
    }

    Trigger(const Trigger& other) noexcept
    {
        if (other.base_ptr)
        {
            base_ptr = other.base_ptr->placement_clone(&trigger_actual_storage_);
        }
    }

    auto operator=(const Trigger& other) noexcept -> Trigger&
    {
        destroy_actual();

        if (other.base_ptr)
        {
            base_ptr = other.base_ptr->placement_clone(&trigger_actual_storage_);
        }

        return *this;
    }

    ~Trigger() noexcept
    {
        destroy_actual();
    }

    auto destroy_actual() noexcept -> void
    {
        if (base_ptr)
        {
            base_ptr->~Trigger_base();
            base_ptr = nullptr;
        }
    }

    auto operator()() const
    {
        if (!base_ptr)
        {
            // deal with this situation (error or just ignore and return)
        }

        base_ptr->call();
    }
};

Usage:

struct X
{    
    auto foo() -> void;
};


auto test()
{
    X x;

    Trigger f{x, &X::foo};

    f();
}

Warning: only tested for compilation errors.

You need to thoroughly test it for correctness.

You need to profile it and see if it has a better performance than other solutions. The advantage of this is because it's in house cooked you can make tweaks to the implementation to increase performance on your specific scenarios.

  • This code is correct as far as it goes. But if you pulled the expression sizeof(detail::Trigger_actual<detail::Trigger_test_size>) out into a default value for a template non-type parameter size_t Size = that-expression, and also provided a template non-type parameter for Alignment and a type parameter for the desired signature (not hard-coding void(void)), then you'd have reinvented sg14::inplace_function except with no tests and it only works for member functions. :) I suggest just using inplace_function. – Quuxplusone Sep 12 '17 at 17:33
  • @Quuxplusone I didn't know about sg14::inplace_function. Thank you for the link – bolov Sep 13 '17 at 10:43
0

Run this little hack and it probably will print the amount of bytes you can capture without allocating memory:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <cstring>

void h(std::function<void(void*)>&& f, void* g)
{
  f(g);
}

template<size_t number_of_size_t>
void do_test()
{
  size_t a[number_of_size_t];
  std::memset(a, 0, sizeof(a));
  a[0] = sizeof(a);

  std::function<void(void*)> g = [a](void* ptr) {
    if (&a != ptr)
      std::cout << "malloc was called when capturing " << a[0] << " bytes." << std::endl;
    else
      std::cout << "No allocation took place when capturing " << a[0] << " bytes." << std::endl;
  };

  h(std::move(g), &g);
}

int main()
{
  do_test<1>();
  do_test<2>();
  do_test<3>();
  do_test<4>();
}

With gcc version 8.3.0 this prints

No allocation took place when capturing 8 bytes.
No allocation took place when capturing 16 bytes.
malloc was called when capturing 24 bytes.
malloc was called when capturing 32 bytes.

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