0
Promise One (resolves in 200ms)
Promise Two (resolves in 400ms)
Promise Three (resolves in 1000ms)
Promise Four (resolves in 300ms)
Promise Five (resolves in 500ms)

These Promises will resolve in the following order

0 - Requests Start
100
200 - Promise One
300 - Promise Four
400 - Promise Two
500 - Promise Five (Most recent application state)
600
700
800
900
1000 - Promise Three (Stagnant application state)

Given that in my app, the response of the Promises dictates the application state, when an older Promise resolves more slowly than a newer one, my application state will be stagnant.

A potential implementation would be to simply not start the next request until a previous request has finished, but this would hang user progress considerably.

EDIT:

I might have left out a bit of necessary context. There's no way for me to tell when a Promise will be added. Promise.all can't have items added to it after it has started, so Promise.all might not work for me.

For a more normal use-case the provided answers probably would have worked nicely, but unfortunately my API is a bit too chatty.

  • Regarding your edit, how exactly are you calling your function to add promises after-the-fact? – Patrick Roberts Sep 12 '17 at 5:02
  • 1
    I might have left out a bit of necessary CODE :p – Jaromanda X Sep 12 '17 at 5:09
  • So, the app is a form and it works by progressively updating the form as you answer questions. So each time you answer a question, a new request is created. My thought was that I could aggregate the 'active' Promises, but the issue is that the user could stop/start answering questions at any time. – 3stacks Sep 12 '17 at 5:28
  • Why are you creating an array in the first place? It seems like the array structure is the core of your issue, but you haven't given enough information to suggest alternative approaches. – loganfsmyth Sep 12 '17 at 5:33
  • My bad, there's no array. I took the braces out to make it less ambiguous but I was trying to keep it abstract, because it's an abstract problem. I'm trying to consider a good way to tackle it conceptually rather than posting current implementations. – 3stacks Sep 12 '17 at 5:45
2

So you want all promises to actually complete but go forward only with the newest promise's value?

Promise.all([p1, p2, p3, p4, p5]) // resolves when all promises have resolved
.then((results) => {
    // results is an array of resolved values
})

Would Promise.all() work for you? Bear in mind that it rejects if any of the promises reject.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Promise/all

1

Using ES2017 async / await, you can improve upon the readability of @MauricioPoppe's answer by doing the following:

const pTimeout = (value, timeout) => 
  new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, timeout, value))

// takes the same arguments as Promise.all but resolves with the
// resolution value of the last element
async function resolveWithLast (promises) {
  const results = await Promise.all(promises)
  return results.pop()
}

resolveWithLast([
  pTimeout(1, 200),
  pTimeout(2, 400),
  pTimeout(3, 1000),
  pTimeout(4, 300),
  pTimeout(5, 500)
]).then(value => console.log(value))

1

Create a new promise that resolves when all the other promises have been resolved (done with Promise.all), then chain another promise that resolves with the value of the last element of the iterable sent to Promise.all

const pTimeout = (value, timeout) => 
  new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, timeout, value))

// takes the same arguments as Promise.all but resolves with the
// resolution value of the last element
function resolveWithLast (promises) {
  return Promise.all(promises)
    .then(results => results.pop())
}

resolveWithLast([
  pTimeout(1, 200),
  pTimeout(2, 400),
  pTimeout(3, 1000),
  pTimeout(4, 300),
  pTimeout(5, 500)
])
  .then(value => console.log(value))

  • Nice idea! I'll give this a go and revisit shortly. – 3stacks Sep 12 '17 at 4:44
  • You could improve the readability of this by changing the .then() callback to results => results.pop() – Patrick Roberts Sep 12 '17 at 4:56
  • @PatrickRoberts great idea! thanks for the feedback – Mauricio Poppe Sep 12 '17 at 6:39

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