94

I'm looking for a function that will convert a standard IPv4 address into an Integer. Bonus points available for a function that will do the opposite.

Solution should be in C#.

  • 13
    WARNING: the integers resulting from the accepted answer will be wrong, because IP addresses are in network order (big-endian), while ints are little-endian on most systems. So you must reverse the bytes before converting. See my answer for correct conversions. Also, even for IPv4, an int can't hold addresses bigger than 127.255.255.255, e.g. the broadcast address, so use a uint. – Saeb Amini Nov 12 '12 at 20:00

21 Answers 21

135

32-bit unsigned integers are IPv4 addresses. Meanwhile, the IPAddress.Address property, while deprecated, is an Int64 that returns the unsigned 32-bit value of the IPv4 address (the catch is, it's in network byte order, so you need to swap it around).

For example, my local google.com is at 64.233.187.99. That's equivalent to:

64*2^24 + 233*2^16 + 187*2^8 + 99
= 1089059683

And indeed, http://1089059683/ works as expected (at least in Windows, tested with IE, Firefox and Chrome; doesn't work on iPhone though).

Here's a test program to show both conversions, including the network/host byte swapping:

using System;
using System.Net;

class App
{
    static long ToInt(string addr)
    {
        // careful of sign extension: convert to uint first;
        // unsigned NetworkToHostOrder ought to be provided.
        return (long) (uint) IPAddress.NetworkToHostOrder(
             (int) IPAddress.Parse(addr).Address);
    }

    static string ToAddr(long address)
    {
        return IPAddress.Parse(address.ToString()).ToString();
        // This also works:
        // return new IPAddress((uint) IPAddress.HostToNetworkOrder(
        //    (int) address)).ToString();
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(ToInt("64.233.187.99"));
        Console.WriteLine(ToAddr(1089059683));
    }
}
  • 51
    +! with the http://[int] I've never seen that! Nifty – Chad Grant May 5 '09 at 22:15
  • 2
    Confirmed in Opera 11 on Ubuntu Linux 10.04: it converts the int back to the familiar w.x.y.z form, and It Works. – Piskvor Dec 7 '10 at 15:21
  • 4
    for fun: you can also do 0xAABBCCDD ie hex addresses too ;) – Brady Moritz Jun 24 '13 at 23:01
  • 1
    IPAddress.Address is obsolete as of .Net 4.0. – Erik Philips Jul 16 '14 at 21:42
  • 1
    you may use BitConverter.ToUInt32(IPAddress.Parse(value).GetAddressBytes().Reverse().ToArray() to fix IPAddress.Address is obsolete – Mhmd May 28 '16 at 11:50
38

@Barry Kelly and @Andrew Hare, actually, I don't think multiplying is the most clear way to do this (alltough correct).

An Int32 "formatted" IP address can be seen as the following structure

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)] 
struct IPv4Address
{
   public Byte A;
   public Byte B;
   public Byte C;
   public Byte D;
} 
// to actually cast it from or to an int32 I think you 
// need to reverse the fields due to little endian

So to convert the ip address 64.233.187.99 you could do:

(64  = 0x40) << 24 == 0x40000000
(233 = 0xE9) << 16 == 0x00E90000
(187 = 0xBB) << 8  == 0x0000BB00
(99  = 0x63)       == 0x00000063
                      ---------- =|
                      0x40E9BB63

so you could add them up using + or you could binairy or them together. Resulting in 0x40E9BB63 which is 1089059683. (In my opinion looking in hex it's much easier to see the bytes)

So you could write the function as:

int ipToInt(int first, int second, 
    int third, int fourth)
{
    return (first << 24) | (second << 16) | (third << 8) | (fourth);
}
  • 1
    I believe that ip's were speced that way to specifically allow for such behavior... bit shifts are much more efficient on most microprocessors than muls and adds. – Ape-inago Jun 14 '09 at 5:46
  • 1
    @Ape-inago multiplications by constant powers of two are normally optimized into bit shifts, fwiw. – Barry Kelly Apr 30 '14 at 13:14
  • Instead of bit shifting, you can use LayoutKind.Explicit and FieldOffset to reverse the order in which the bytes are stored. Of course, that only works for little endian architecture. Example on github. – RubberDuck Nov 29 '15 at 12:16
  • 1
    Have to point out that int is signed so if you shift 192 by 24 bits you will get negative integer so this code is broken for high octet having high bit on first place. – Mateusz Feb 14 at 15:21
29

To convert from IPv4 to correct integer:

IPAddress address = IPAddress.Parse("255.255.255.254");
byte[] bytes = address.GetAddressBytes();
Array.Reverse(bytes); // flip big-endian(network order) to little-endian
uint intAddress = BitConverter.ToUInt32(bytes, 0);

And to convert back:

byte[] bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(4294967294);
Array.Reverse(bytes); // flip little-endian to big-endian(network order)
string ipAddress = new IPAddress(bytes).ToString();

Explanation:

IP addresses are in network order (big-endian), while ints are little-endian on Windows, so to get a correct value, you must reverse the bytes before converting.

Also, even for IPv4, an int can't hold addresses bigger than 127.255.255.255, e.g. the broadcast address (255.255.255.255), so use a uint.

  • This doesn't actually seem to make a difference on Windows using .NET - unsure about Mono. See dotnetfiddle.net/cBIOj2 – Jesse Mar 7 '18 at 12:42
  • 1
    @Jesse it happens to not make a difference for your input of 1.1.1.1 because its byte array is palindromic. Try with non-palindromic ones like 127.0.0.1 or 192.168.1.1. – Saeb Amini Mar 7 '18 at 23:05
  • I see the issue. Repeated numbers such as 1.1.1.1, 2.2.2.2, 123.123.123.123 always yield the same result. For posterity, see updated fiddle: dotnetfiddle.net/aR6fhc – Jesse Mar 9 '18 at 18:30
  • Like to note that I had to use System.Net.IPAddress to get this working. Works great! – Shrout1 Apr 6 '18 at 20:45
  • @Jesse that wouldn't be just for repeating numbers, but for all palindromic IP addresses. So 2.1.1.2 would be the same. – Saeb Amini Jan 21 at 22:49
12

Try this ones:

private int IpToInt32(string ipAddress)
{
   return BitConverter.ToInt32(IPAddress.Parse(ipAddress).GetAddressBytes().Reverse().ToArray(), 0);
}

private string Int32ToIp(int ipAddress)
{
   return new IPAddress(BitConverter.GetBytes(ipAddress).Reverse().ToArray()).ToString();
}
  • Reverse() returns void, so you cannot call ToArray() on it (for future readers). Instead, assign a value to the reversed bytes, then you can call ToArray(). – Erik Philips Jul 16 '14 at 21:46
  • Reverse() is extension method of IEnumerable. Above code is perfectly ok. – Ant Nov 12 '14 at 10:04
  • 1
    This method yields negative numbers for certain IPs (e.g. 140.117.0.0) – lightxx Jan 26 '15 at 9:13
7

As noone posted the code that uses BitConverter and actually checks the endianness, here goes:

byte[] ip = address.Split('.').Select(s => Byte.Parse(s)).ToArray();
if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian) {
  Array.Reverse(ip);
}
int num = BitConverter.ToInt32(ip, 0);

and back:

byte[] ip = BitConverter.GetBytes(num);
if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian) {
  Array.Reverse(ip);
}
string address = String.Join(".", ip.Select(n => n.ToString()));
  • 2
    You need to use a uint, but this is the most correct answer here. – RubberDuck Nov 29 '15 at 12:22
  • @RubberDuck: You only need to use an uint if you want the 32 bits of data as an unsigned number, an int is capable of holding the same information. If you want to store it in a database an int is better suited, you need a bigint to be able to store it in the unsigned form. – Guffa Nov 29 '15 at 12:32
  • 1
    A uint is a better representation IMO. A signed int needs a bit for the sign, so you lose addresses at the very top of the range. Yes, it can hold the same data, but it will be output as a negative number, which isn't a valid IP if you type it in the address bar. – RubberDuck Nov 29 '15 at 12:36
  • 1
    Uhhh... Yes you can. 1089059683 – RubberDuck Nov 29 '15 at 12:59
  • 1
    @Guffa And that's semantics. – Abion47 Nov 4 '16 at 0:50
6

I have encountered some problems with the described solutions, when facing IP Adresses with a very large value. The result would be, that the byte[0] * 16777216 thingy would overflow and become a negative int value. what fixed it for me, is the a simple type casting operation.

public static long ConvertIPToLong(string ipAddress)
{
    System.Net.IPAddress ip;

    if (System.Net.IPAddress.TryParse(ipAddress, out ip))
    {
        byte[] bytes = ip.GetAddressBytes();

        return (long)
            (
            16777216 * (long)bytes[0] +
            65536 * (long)bytes[1] +
            256 * (long)bytes[2] +
            (long)bytes[3]
            )
            ;
    }
    else
        return 0;
}
4

The reverse of Davy Landman's function

string IntToIp(int d)
{
  int v1 = d & 0xff;
  int v2 = (d >> 8) & 0xff;
  int v3 = (d >> 16) & 0xff;
  int v4 = (d >> 24);
  return v4 + "." + v3 + "." + v2 + "." + v1;
}
  • could you explain more about this? – Developerium Dec 21 '13 at 19:09
3

My question was closed, I have no idea why . The accepted answer here is not the same as what I need.

This gives me the correct integer value for an IP..

public double IPAddressToNumber(string IPaddress)
{
    int i;
    string [] arrDec;
    double num = 0;
    if (IPaddress == "")
    {
        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        arrDec = IPaddress.Split('.');
        for(i = arrDec.Length - 1; i >= 0 ; i = i -1)
            {
                num += ((int.Parse(arrDec[i])%256) * Math.Pow(256 ,(3 - i )));
            }
        return num;
    }
}
  • As long as you can do the conversion both way, I don't see why the output number has to be correct just as long as it's consistent. – GateKiller Jan 22 '09 at 11:22
  • Depends on what you want to use the number for. You cant use the other conversion for doing a >= and <= query to find an IP.. – Coolcoder Jan 22 '09 at 11:26
2

Assembled several of the above answers into an extension method that handles the Endianness of the machine and handles IPv4 addresses that were mapped to IPv6.

public static class IPAddressExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Converts IPv4 and IPv4 mapped to IPv6 addresses to an unsigned integer.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="address">The address to conver</param>
    /// <returns>An unsigned integer that represents an IPv4 address.</returns>
    public static uint ToUint(this IPAddress address)
    {
        if (address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork || address.IsIPv4MappedToIPv6)
        {
            var bytes = address.GetAddressBytes();
            if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
                Array.Reverse(bytes);

            return BitConverter.ToUInt32(bytes, 0);
        }
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("address", "Address must be IPv4 or IPv4 mapped to IPv6");
    }
}

Unit tests:

[TestClass]
public class IPAddressExtensionsTests
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void SimpleIp1()
    {
        var ip = IPAddress.Parse("0.0.0.15");
        uint expected = GetExpected(0, 0, 0, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, ip.ToUint());
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void SimpleIp2()
    {
        var ip = IPAddress.Parse("0.0.1.15");
        uint expected = GetExpected(0, 0, 1, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, ip.ToUint());
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void SimpleIpSix1()
    {
        var ip = IPAddress.Parse("0.0.0.15").MapToIPv6();
        uint expected = GetExpected(0, 0, 0, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, ip.ToUint());
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void SimpleIpSix2()
    {
        var ip = IPAddress.Parse("0.0.1.15").MapToIPv6();
        uint expected = GetExpected(0, 0, 1, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, ip.ToUint());
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void HighBits()
    {
        var ip = IPAddress.Parse("200.12.1.15").MapToIPv6();
        uint expected = GetExpected(200, 12, 1, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, ip.ToUint());
    }
    uint GetExpected(uint a, uint b, uint c, uint d)
    {
        return
            (a * 256u * 256u * 256u) +
            (b * 256u * 256u) +
            (c * 256u) +
            (d);
    }
}
1

If you were interested in the function not just the answer here is how it is done:

int ipToInt(int first, int second, 
    int third, int fourth)
{
    return Convert.ToInt32((first * Math.Pow(256, 3))
        + (second * Math.Pow(256, 2)) + (third * 256) + fourth);
}

with first through fourth being the segments of the IPv4 address.

  • 1
    I think it would be more clear if you'd used shift instead of Math.Pow. – Mehrdad Afshari Jan 20 '09 at 15:42
  • This will throw an overflow exception if first is > 127. Davy Landman's answer is the best way to do this. – mhenry1384 Aug 27 '12 at 22:04
  • int32 is signed so it will return negative value > 127 for first octet – Mateusz Feb 14 at 15:22
1

With the UInt32 in the proper little-endian format, here are two simple conversion functions:

public uint GetIpAsUInt32(string ipString)
{
    IPAddress address = IPAddress.Parse(ipString);

    byte[] ipBytes = address.GetAddressBytes();

    Array.Reverse(ipBytes);

    return BitConverter.ToUInt32(ipBytes, 0);
}

public string GetIpAsString(uint ipVal)
{
    byte[] ipBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(ipVal);

    Array.Reverse(ipBytes);

    return new IPAddress(ipBytes).ToString();
}
1
public bool TryParseIPv4Address(string value, out uint result)
{
    IPAddress ipAddress;

    if (!IPAddress.TryParse(value, out ipAddress) ||
        (ipAddress.AddressFamily != System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork))
    {
        result = 0;
        return false;
    }

    result = BitConverter.ToUInt32(ipAddress.GetAddressBytes().Reverse().ToArray(), 0);
    return true;
}
1
    public static Int32 getLongIPAddress(string ipAddress)
    {
        return IPAddress.NetworkToHostOrder(BitConverter.ToInt32(IPAddress.Parse(ipAddress).GetAddressBytes(), 0));
    }

The above example would be the way I go.. Only thing you might have to do is convert to a UInt32 for display purposes, or string purposes including using it as a long address in string form.

Which is what is needed when using the IPAddress.Parse(String) function. Sigh.

0

here's a solution that I worked out today (should've googled first!):

    private static string IpToDecimal2(string ipAddress)
    {
        // need a shift counter
        int shift = 3;

        // loop through the octets and compute the decimal version
        var octets = ipAddress.Split('.').Select(p => long.Parse(p));
        return octets.Aggregate(0L, (total, octet) => (total + (octet << (shift-- * 8)))).ToString();
    }

i'm using LINQ, lambda and some of the extensions on generics, so while it produces the same result it uses some of the new language features and you can do it in three lines of code.

i have the explanation on my blog if you're interested.

cheers, -jc

0

I think this is wrong: "65536" ==> 0.0.255.255" Should be: "65535" ==> 0.0.255.255" or "65536" ==> 0.1.0.0"

0

@Davy Ladman your solution with shift are corrent but only for ip starting with number less or equal 99, infact first octect must be cast up to long.

Anyway convert back with long type is quite difficult because store 64 bit (not 32 for Ip) and fill 4 bytes with zeroes

static uint ToInt(string addr)
{
   return BitConverter.ToUInt32(IPAddress.Parse(addr).GetAddressBytes(), 0);
}

static string ToAddr(uint address)
{
    return new IPAddress(address).ToString();
}

Enjoy!

Massimo

0

Assuming you have an IP Address in string format (eg. 254.254.254.254)

string[] vals = inVal.Split('.');
uint output = 0;
for (byte i = 0; i < vals.Length; i++) output += (uint)(byte.Parse(vals[i]) << 8 * (vals.GetUpperBound(0) - i));
0
var ipAddress = "10.101.5.56";

var longAddress = long.Parse(string.Join("", ipAddress.Split('.').Select(x => x.PadLeft(3, '0'))));

Console.WriteLine(longAddress);

Output: 10101005056

0
var address = IPAddress.Parse("10.0.11.174").GetAddressBytes();
long m_Address = ((address[3] << 24 | address[2] << 16 | address[1] << 8 | address[0]) & 0x0FFFFFFFF);
  • the GetAddressBytes method may returns the bytes in the reverse order, depending if the machine is endian or endian-ness so the correct statement may be for some machines: long m_Address = (address[0] << 24 | address[1] << 16 | address[2] << 8 | address[3]) & 0x0FFFFFFFF – ByteArtisan May 6 '16 at 23:08
0

I noticed that System.Net.IPAddress have Address property (System.Int64) and constructor, which also accept Int64 data type. So you can use this to convert IP address to/from numeric (although not Int32, but Int64) format.

-1

Take a look at some of the crazy parsing examples in .Net's IPAddress.Parse: (MSDN)

"65536" ==> 0.0.255.255
"20.2" ==> 20.0.0.2
"20.65535" ==> 20.0.255.255
"128.1.2" ==> 128.1.0.2

  • This isn't really an answer. Why not put it as a comment on one of the top answers? – DanM7 Jan 17 '13 at 21:04

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