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Like most people writing (and reading) the question about whether to keep composer.lock in version-control, we keep ours there.

However, this causes us trouble every time the file is independently updated in different code-branches. Even when the changes are unrelated and affect the sections of the file afar from each other, the "content-hash" line is causing a conflict every time. Worse, neither "side" is correct and whoever is doing the merging must regenerate the file by hand...

Maybe, the line is not really necessary? Before asking, whether (the current version of) composer will work without it, what functionality would be missing? The hash seems to guard against the file itself changing -- but the source-control system is already doing that...

Can I simply remove the line? If it can not be done today, would it be a desirable feature for composer?

  • Ha, nice to see you here, Mikhail! – localheinz Sep 14 '17 at 14:26
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Purpose of the content hash

As you can see in Composer\Package\Locker::getContentHash(), the content hash takes into account the following fields of composer.json:

$relevantKeys = array(
    'name',
    'version',
    'require',
    'require-dev',
    'conflict',
    'replace',
    'provide',
    'minimum-stability',
    'prefer-stable',
    'repositories',
    'extra',
);

The only reason for the content hash to change is a change of one of the values of the corresponding properties in composer.json.

Composer uses the content hash to determine whether relevant fields in composer.json are in sync with composer.lock. You can run

$ composer validate

to find out if they are in sync.

If composer.json and composer.lock are not in sync, a message similar to this will be shown

The lock file is not up to date with the latest changes in composer.json, it is recommended that you run composer update.

For reference, see https://getcomposer.org/doc/03-cli.md#validate:

You should always run the validate command before you commit your composer.json file, and before you tag a release. It will check if your composer.json is valid.

Resolving conflicts in composer.lock

If you have trouble resolving conflicts in composer.lock, maybe this helps:

Step 1: Accept upstream changes

Usually, you will probably attempt to rebase a branch on top of the upstream changes. When already in conflict, use your IDE, or run

$ git checkout --theirs composer.lock

to accept the upstream changes to composer.lock. Since this is a generated file, you really don't want to resolve conflicts in it.

Step 2: Re-apply changes to composer.json and composer.lock

As pointed out earlier, there are a range of the relevant keys in composer.json. Some of them can be modified by corresponding commands, others cannot.

For example, if one of the changes is a newly added or removed package, run

$ composer require foo/bar:^1.2.3

or

$ composer remove foo/bar

to apply the changes.

If the changes cannot be applied by running a command, manually modify composer.json, then run

$ composer update --lock

This will update the content hash.

For reference, see https://getcomposer.org/doc/03-cli.md#update:

--lock: Only updates the lock file hash to suppress warning about the lock file being out of date.

  • Thanks. Your answer would seem to suggest, the composer.lock should not after all be checked into source control -- because it is an artefact, rather than a human-coded file... – Mikhail T. Sep 14 '17 at 14:38
  • 1
    It depends on what you want to achieve, of course. For applications, I would always want to check in composer.lock. This ensures that running composer install installs the exact same dependencies every time, in every environment (unless platform requirements aren't satisfied, then nothing will be installed. Not checking in composer.lock and running composer install has the same effect as running composer update (assuming that no composer.lock already exists). This might have undesired consequences, as different versions of packages could be installed. – localheinz Sep 14 '17 at 14:41
  • For libraries, you can check in composer.lock, but generally, you want to ensure that the library works with a range of versions, rather than the versions currently pinned to. Then you usually run builds against the lowest and highest versions. If you then check in composer.lock, you can also run a build against the set of versions pinned to in composer.lock. – localheinz Sep 14 '17 at 14:43
  • Is that check/assurance even meaningful, unless you are also locking down the versions of the OS kernel, libc, the php, and the C-compiler used to compile php (and all of its extensions)? But I'm not arguing against the use of the composer.lock -- only against checking it into source-control... It would be generated during build instead... – Mikhail T. Sep 14 '17 at 15:51
  • 1
    It would seem, the requirements weren't properly specified in composer.json -- which should be checked-in. But the composer.lock, which is derived from it, no... Of course, accidents have -- and will continue to -- happen... – Mikhail T. Sep 14 '17 at 17:00

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