My iOS app uses a custom height for the UINavigationBar which leads to some problems on the new iPhone X.

Does someone already know how to reliable detect programmatically (in Objective-C) if an app is running on iPhone X?

EDIT:

Of course checking the size of the screen is possible, however, I wonder if there is some "build in" method like TARGET_OS_IPHONE to detect iOS...

if (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) {
    CGSize screenSize = [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size;
    if (screenSize.height == 812)
        NSLog(@"iPhone X");
}

EDIT 2:

I do not think, that my question is a duplicate of the linked question. Of course, there are methods to "measure" different properties of the current device and to use the results to decide which device is used. However, this was not the actual point of my question as I tried to emphasize in my first edit.

The actual question is: "Is it possible to directly detect if the current device is an iPhone X (e.g. by some SDK feature) or do I have to use indirect measurements"?

By the answers given so far, I assume that the answer is "No, there is no direct methods. Measurements are the way to go".

  • iPhone X has a screen resolution different from others. – El Tomato Sep 13 '17 at 8:21
  • 2
    Yes, as I mentioned in my edit it possible to check the screen size. However the question is, if there is "direct" method to query the device type rather than "indirect" measurements... – Andrei Herford Sep 13 '17 at 8:24
  • 3
    The author just wants to get the device type, not the screen resolution. Why not check the machine name directly? @lubilis is right. – Itachi Sep 20 '17 at 8:00
  • 1
    why don't you just use the safe-area guides as it is recommended by Apple? – holex Nov 17 '17 at 12:03
  • 1
    IMPORTANT, future devs: Do not detect this utilizing screen height as current top solutions suggest, it is bad as it can result in false positives for future devices; will not work if UIWindow hasn't yet rendered (like in your AppDelegate init functions), won't work in landscape apps, and can fail on simulator if scale is set. NEVER use magic numbers for things like this! You can check hardware flags to guarantee success like I have done here: stackoverflow.com/a/51511947/2057171 – Albert Renshaw Jul 25 at 6:21

32 Answers 32

up vote 235 down vote accepted

Based on your question, the answer is No, there are no direct methods, for more information you can get the information from here1 and here2

If you want to detect the iphone X height use 2436px

Device Screen Sizes and resolutions

enter image description here

Device Screen Sizes and Orientations

enter image description here

Swift 3 and above

if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .phone {
        switch UIScreen.main.nativeBounds.height {
        case 1136:
            print("iPhone 5 or 5S or 5C")
        case 1334:
            print("iPhone 6/6S/7/8")
        case 1920, 2208:
            print("iPhone 6+/6S+/7+/8+")
        case 2436:
            print("iPhone X, Xs")
        case 2688:
            print("iPhone Xs Max")
        case 1792:
            print("iPhone Xr")
        default:
            print("unknown")
        }
    }

Objective C

    if([[UIDevice currentDevice]userInterfaceIdiom]==UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) {

        switch ((int)[[UIScreen mainScreen] nativeBounds].size.height) {

            case 1136:
                printf("iPhone 5 or 5S or 5C");
                break;
            case 1334:
                printf("iPhone 6/6S/7/8");
                break;
            case 1920, 2208:
                printf("iPhone 6+/6S+/7+/8+");
                break;
            case 2436:
                printf("iPhone X, Xs");
                break;
               case 2688:
            printf("iPhone Xs Max")
           case 1792:
            printf("iPhone Xr")
            default:
                printf("unknown");
        }
    }

Xamarin.iOS

if(UIDevice.CurrentDevice.UserInterfaceIdiom == UIUserInterfaceIdiom.Phone)
{
       if ((UIScreen.MainScreen.Bounds.Height * UIScreen.MainScreen.Scale) == 1136)
       {
              Console.WriteLine("iPhone 5 or 5S or 5C");
       }    
       //etc...
}

based on your question as follow

or use screenSize.height as float 812.0f not int 812

if (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone) {
    CGSize screenSize = [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size;
     // 812.0 on iPhone X, XS.
   // 896.0 on iPhone XS Max, XR.
    if (screenSize.height >= 812.0f)
        NSLog(@"iPhone X");
}

for more information you can get here

Swift

or detect with topNotch

var hasTopNotch: Bool {
if #available(iOS 11.0,  *) {
    return UIApplication.shared.delegate?.window??.safeAreaInsets.top ?? 0 > 20
}
return false
}

Objective C

-(BOOL)hasTopNotch{
if (@available(iOS 11.0, *)) {
    return [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] window].safeAreaInsets.top > 20.0;
}
return  NO;
}

UPDATE

DO NOT use the userInterfaceIdiom property to identify the device type, as the Apple documentation explains,

For universal applications, you can use this property to tailor the behavior of your application for a specific type of device. For example, iPhone and iPad devices have different screen sizes, so you might want to create different views and controls based on the type of the current device.

That is, this property is just used to identify the running app's view style. However, the iPhone app (not the universal) could be installed in iPad device via App store, in that case, the userInterfaceIdiom will return the UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone, too.

The right way is to get the machine name via uname, check this thread for detail.

  • The resolution of iPhone X is 2436 x 1125 pixels according to : iphonesoft.fr/2017/09/12/… – Medhi Sep 14 '17 at 9:01
  • 1
    @Medhi - the resolution of iphone X is - 1125 x 2436 pixels (~458 ppi pixel density) – Anbu.karthik Sep 14 '17 at 9:03
  • 11
    NO! The iPhone app (not the universe) could be installed in iPad device via App store, in that case, the userInterfaceIdiom will return the UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone, too. This answer is wrong. – Itachi Sep 20 '17 at 7:55
  • @Itachi - I agree your point, is this possible to update the answer based on your comment, its useful for many users – Anbu.karthik Sep 20 '17 at 7:57
  • 1
    @ThreeCoins, please update your answer for plus devices as per suggestion of Leo Dabus. It works on Plus simulator but not on device. – Hiren Gujarati Nov 16 '17 at 11:01

Another possibility, which works on iOS 11 and iOS 12 because the iPhone X is the only one with a notch at the top and an inset of 44. That is what I am really detecting here:

    BOOL iPhoneX = NO;
    if (@available(iOS 11.0, *)) {
        UIWindow *mainWindow = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] window];
        if (mainWindow.safeAreaInsets.top > 20.0) {
            iPhoneX = YES;
        }
    }

And of course, you might need to check the left and right safe area insets if you are in landscape orientation.

Edit: _window is the UIWindow of the AppDelegate, where this check is done in application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions.

Answer updated for iOS 12 to check if top > 20 rather than top > 0.

  • 4
    The safe area insets will contain the status bar height, if one is visible, on other devices. Checking if this is 0 will only tell you if the status bar is visible, not if the device is an iPhone X. – IMcD23 Sep 18 '17 at 23:55
  • 3
    "This may break in iPhone Xs or iPhone 11", said Cook. – Itachi Sep 21 '17 at 9:14
  • 11
    I've adapted a little and use if _window.safeAreaInsets != UIEdgeInsets.zero to allow for any device orientation – Fraser Oct 10 '17 at 0:40
  • 1
    If you don't want to use .top, safeAreaInsets.bottom will be 34 on iPhone X and 0 on other devices – blwinters Jul 7 at 18:58
  • 6
    Warning: Don't use this, it breaks on iOS 12. It's also not documented what UIWindow should do in this case. openradar.appspot.com/42372793 – steipete Jul 19 at 8:49

You shall perform different detections of iPhone X depending on the actual need.

for dealing with the top notch (statusbar, navbar), etc.

class var hasTopNotch: Bool {
    if #available(iOS 11.0, tvOS 11.0, *) {
        // with notch: 44.0 on iPhone X, XS, XS Max, XR.
        // without notch: 20.0 on iPhone 8 on iOS 12+.
        return UIApplication.shared.delegate?.window??.safeAreaInsets.top ?? 0 > 20
    }
    return false
}

for dealing with the bottom home indicator (tabbar), etc.

class var hasBottomSafeAreaInsets: Bool {
    if #available(iOS 11.0, tvOS 11.0, *) {
        // with home indicator: 34.0 on iPhone X, XS, XS Max, XR.
        return UIApplication.shared.delegate?.window??.safeAreaInsets.bottom ?? 0 > 0
    }
    return false
}

for backgrounds size, fullscreen features, etc.

class var isIphoneXOrBigger: Bool {
    // 812.0 on iPhone X, XS.
    // 896.0 on iPhone XS Max, XR.
    return UIScreen.main.bounds.height >= 812
}

Note: eventually mix it with UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone
Note: this method requires to have a LaunchScreen storyboard or proper LaunchImages

for backgrounds ratio, scrolling features, etc.

class var isIphoneXOrLonger: Bool {
    // 812.0 / 375.0 on iPhone X, XS.
    // 896.0 / 414.0 on iPhone XS Max, XR.
    return UIScreen.main.bounds.height / UIScreen.main.bounds.width >= 896.0 / 414.0
}

Note: this method requires to have a LaunchScreen storyboard or proper LaunchImages

for analytics, stats, tracking, etc.

Get the machine identifier and compare it to documented values:

class var isIphoneX: Bool {
    var size = 0
    sysctlbyname("hw.machine", nil, &size, nil, 0)
    var machine = [CChar](repeating: 0, count: size)
    sysctlbyname("hw.machine", &machine, &size, nil, 0)
    let model = String(cString: machine)
    return model == "iPhone10,3" || model == "iPhone10,6"
}

To include the simulator as a valid iPhone X in your analytics:

class var isIphoneX: Bool {
    let model: String
    if TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR != 0 {
        model = ProcessInfo.processInfo.environment["SIMULATOR_MODEL_IDENTIFIER"] ?? ""
    } else {
        var size = 0
        sysctlbyname("hw.machine", nil, &size, nil, 0)
        var machine = [CChar](repeating: 0, count: size)
        sysctlbyname("hw.machine", &machine, &size, nil, 0)
        model = String(cString: machine)
    }
    return model == "iPhone10,3" || model == "iPhone10,6"
}

To include iPhone XS, XS Max and XR, simply look for models starting with "iPhone11,":

return model == "iPhone10,3" || model == "iPhone10,6" || model.starts(with: "iPhone11,")

for faceID support

import LocalAuthentication
/// will fail if user denies canEvaluatePolicy(_:error:)
class var canUseFaceID: Bool {
    if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {
        return LAContext().biometryType == .typeFaceID
    }
    return false
}
  • I was hoping that the return LAContext().biometryType == .typeFaceID would work even if the user had denied canEvaluatePolicy, but it doesn't work for me, it still returns .none – Jeremy Nov 7 '17 at 21:55
  • Well @Jeremy, it's a documented behavior, consequence of Apple privacy policy. That's why the comment above the method. – Cœur Nov 8 '17 at 1:11
  • Ah, I misinterpreted your comment. I thought you meant using canEvaluatePolicy could fail, so use the following instead. I find it a bit odd that you are allowed it check if the device has Face ID until the user responds to the toggle and then you can't even check anymore. How am I supposed to provide a helpful error message to say to go to Settings and toggle Face ID? – Jeremy Nov 9 '17 at 6:19
  • @Jeremy I don't own an iPhone X, so I don't know. Maybe you could use the model detection above (model == "iPhone10,3" || model == "iPhone10,6"), and if canUseFaceID returns false, then it means it was denied by user. – Cœur Nov 9 '17 at 6:34
  • 1
    @MateoOlaya Nothing in my answer would be rejected by Apple: you can use it all. – Cœur Sep 28 at 5:02

You can do like this to detect iPhone X device according to dimension.

Swift

if UIDevice().userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && UIScreen.main.nativeBounds.height == 2436 {
   //iPhone X
}

Objective - C

if ([UIDevice currentDevice].userInterfaceIdiom == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone && UIScreen.mainScreen.nativeBounds.size.height == 2436)  {
  //iPhone X     
}

enter image description here

But,

This is not sufficient way. What if Apple announced next iPhone with same dimension of iPhone X. so the best way is to use Hardware string to detect the device.

For newer device Hardware string is as below.

iPhone 8 - iPhone10,1 or iPhone 10,4

iPhone 8 Plus - iPhone10,2 or iPhone 10,5

iPhone X - iPhone10,3 or iPhone10,6

  • 1
    You should to use [UIDevice currentDevice] instead of [[UIDevice alloc] init] – S. Matsepura Nov 7 '17 at 7:38
  • Simple and effective code. Works good for me in objective c. – R. Mohan Dec 26 '17 at 7:36
  • the only problem with the hardware string is it doesn't work on the simulator – quemeful Oct 9 at 19:30

Check the device model / machine name, DO NOT use the point/pixel count in your code directly, it's hard code!

#import <sys/utsname.h>

NSString* deviceName()
{
    struct utsname systemInfo;
    uname(&systemInfo);

    return [NSString stringWithCString:systemInfo.machine
                          encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
}

Result:

@"iPhone10,3" on iPhone X (CDMA)
@"iPhone10,6" on iPhone X (GSM)

Refer to this answer.

Full code implementation:

#import <sys/utsname.h>

BOOL IsiPhoneX(void)
{
    static BOOL isiPhoneX = NO;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;

    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
        NSString *model = NSProcessInfo.processInfo.environment[@"SIMULATOR_MODEL_IDENTIFIER"];
#else

        struct utsname systemInfo;
        uname(&systemInfo);

        NSString *model = [NSString stringWithCString:systemInfo.machine
                                            encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
#endif
        isiPhoneX = [model isEqualToString:@"iPhone10,3"] || [model isEqualToString:@"iPhone10,6"];
    });

    return isiPhoneX;
}
  • While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. - From Review – Oliver Sep 21 '17 at 9:02
  • Excellent answer since it handles the simulator correctly. Please add the #import line to the "full code" section. I missed that (copy/pasted) on my first attempt. – mpoisot Nov 9 '17 at 21:08
  • that is my preferred method. Refer to this wiki for a complete list of device model strings. As a side comment, @"iphone10,3" could also be viewed as hard code. – YvesLeBorg Nov 14 '17 at 16:31
  • @YvesLeBorg Yes, it's really a critical controversial issue. The hardware model string has a unique identifier than screen points for the device, I think. Generally, it's used for data statistics. – Itachi Nov 15 '17 at 3:00
#define IS_IPHONE        (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone)
#define IS_IPHONE_4      (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 480.0)
#define IS_IPHONE_5      (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 568.0)
#define IS_IPHONE_6      (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 667.0)
#define IS_IPHONE_6PLUS  (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] nativeScale] == 3.0f)
#define IS_IPHONE_6_PLUS (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 736.0)
#define IS_IPHONE_X      (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 812.0)

define IS_IPHONE_X (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 812.0)

#define IS_IPHONE_XS      (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 812.0)
#define IS_IPHONE_X_MAX      (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 896.0)
#define IS_RETINA        ([[UIScreen mainScreen] scale] >= 2.0) // 3.0 for iPhone X, 2.0 for others

#define IS_IPAD_DEVICE   [(NSString*)[UIDevice currentDevice].model hasPrefix:@"iPad"]

Note:- Be careful, it works fine only for portrait orientation

  • 1
    This inside Prefix.pch file works just excellent. – Kiko Seijo Jan 4 at 16:45
  • 2
    Be careful, it works fine only for portrait orientation – CFIFok May 10 at 14:08
  • 1
    Thanks for this. Works well. In Landscape mode you need to adjust those numbers. The magic number of iPhoneX in Landscape mode is 375.0 – pvella May 27 at 0:36

After looking at all the answers this is what I ended up doing:

Solution (Swift 4.1 compatible)

extension UIDevice {
    static var isIphoneX: Bool {
        var modelIdentifier = ""
        if isSimulator {
            modelIdentifier = ProcessInfo.processInfo.environment["SIMULATOR_MODEL_IDENTIFIER"] ?? ""
        } else {
            var size = 0
            sysctlbyname("hw.machine", nil, &size, nil, 0)
            var machine = [CChar](repeating: 0, count: size)
            sysctlbyname("hw.machine", &machine, &size, nil, 0)
            modelIdentifier = String(cString: machine)
        }

        return modelIdentifier == "iPhone10,3" || modelIdentifier == "iPhone10,6"
    }

    static var isSimulator: Bool {
        return TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR != 0
    }
}

Use

if UIDevice.isIphoneX {
    // is iPhoneX
} else {
    // is not iPhoneX
}

Note

Pre Swift 4.1 you can check if the app is running on a simulator like so:

TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR != 0

From Swift 4.1 and onwards you can check if the app is running on a simulator using the Target environment platform condition:

#if targetEnvironment(simulator)
    return true
#else
    return false
#endif

(the older method will still work, but this new method is more future proof)

  • is apple will be fine with this ? – commando24 May 10 at 10:01
  • @commando24 Yes, I don't see any reason for them to reject the app because of this code. – Cloud9999Strife May 10 at 10:22

All of these answers based on dimensions are susceptible to incorrect behavior on future devices. They'll work today, but what if there's an iPhone next year that's the same size but has the camera, etc. under the glass so there's no "notch?" If the only option is to update the app, then it's a poor solution for you and your customers.

You can also check the hardware model string like "iPhone10,1", but that's problematic because sometimes Apple releases different model numbers for different carriers around the world.

The correct approach is to redesign the top layout, or solve the problems you're having with the custom navigation bar height (that's what I'd focus on). But, if you decide not to do either of those things, realize that whatever you're doing is a hack to get this to work today, and you'll need to correct it at some point, perhaps multiple times, to keep the hacks working.

  • 1
    Right. Refining an assumption that number X will always be A to one that number X will always be A unless condition Y when it'll be B is just digging deeper. Size based on the Apple-nominated safe area, not by second-guessing it. – Tommy Sep 19 '17 at 15:15
  • 1
    I'll worry about the next iPhone when it's actually out there. I want my app to work TODAY. – Vahid Amiri Dec 4 '17 at 22:21

Yes, it is possible. Download the UIDevice-Hardware extension (or install via CocoaPod 'UIDevice-Hardware') and then use:

NSString* modelID = [[[UIDevice currentDevice] modelIdentifier];
BOOL isIphoneX = [modelID isEqualToString:@"iPhone10,3"] || [modelID isEqualToString:@"iPhone10,6"];

Note that this won't work in the Simulator, only on the actual device.

  • All device code here : iphonesoft.fr/2016/10/31/… Example : iPhone X : iPhone10,5 and iPhone10,6 – Medhi Sep 14 '17 at 9:01
  • The Hardware strings from wikipedia said "iPhone10,3 and iPhone10,6". @Medhi – Itachi Sep 21 '17 at 9:23
  • @Medhi, you can use ProcessInfo.processInfo.environment["SIMULATOR_MODEL_IDENTIF‌​IER"] in Simulator to get the actual values from Xcode. – Cœur Nov 7 '17 at 1:33

SWIFT 4+ Answer

iPhone X, XR, XS, XSMAX:

Note: Need real device for test

Reference

 let deviceType = UIDevice.current.modelName
        switch deviceType {
        case "iPhone10,3", "iPhone10,6":
            print("iPhoneX")
        case "iPhone11,2":
            print("iPhone XS")
        case "iPhone11,4":
            print("iPhone XS Max")
        case "iPhone11,6":
            print("iPhone XS Max China")
        case "iPhone11,8":
            print("iPhone XR")
        default:
            break
}

extension UIDevice {
    var modelName: String {
        var systemInfo = utsname()
        uname(&systemInfo)
        let machineMirror = Mirror(reflecting: systemInfo.machine)
        let identifier = machineMirror.children.reduce("") { identifier, element in
            guard let value = element.value as? Int8, value != 0 else { return identifier }
            return identifier + String(UnicodeScalar(UInt8(value)))
        }
        return identifier
    }
}
  • @Cœur good addition, Improved my answer :) – Jack Nov 1 '17 at 9:39
  • For method 1, you can take away the "var window" property outside the func and just a "let" constant within it (type UIWindow, i.e. not optional). I like this answer since at startup, self.view.window may be nil, and UIApplication.shared.keyWindow may likewise be nil, whereas creating a UIWindow in this way works every time. – Rolleric Nov 26 '17 at 13:26

According the @saswanb's response, this is a Swift 4 version :

var iphoneX = false
if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {
    if ((UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.top)! > CGFloat(0.0)) {
        iphoneX = true
    }
}

I know it's only a Swift solution, but it could help someone.

I have globals.swift in every project and one of the things I always add is DeviceType to easily detect the user's device:

struct ScreenSize {
  static let width = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.width
  static let height = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.height
  static let frame = CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: ScreenSize.width, height: ScreenSize.height)
  static let maxWH = max(ScreenSize.width, ScreenSize.height)
}

struct DeviceType {
  static let iPhone4orLess  = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxWH < 568.0
  static let iPhone5orSE    = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxWH == 568.0
  static let iPhone678      = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxWH == 667.0
  static let iPhone678p     = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxWH == 736.0
  static let iPhoneX        = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxWH == 812.0
}

Then to use it:

if DeviceType.iPhoneX {
  print("This executes only on iPhoneX")
}
  • 1
    Friend new to Swift asked how to use this, just in case someone else doesn’t know… if DeviceType.iPhoneX { //do something for iPhone X notch }else{ // don’t do anything about notch } – LIAM BOLLING Apr 8 at 18:49

You should not assume that the only device that Apple releases with a different UINavigationBar height will be the iPhone X. Try to solve this problem using a more generic solution. If you want the bar to always be 20px bigger than its default height, your code should add 20px to the height of the bar, instead of setting it to 64px (44px + 20px).

  • So, what other solution do you have to propose ? – Stephane Mathis Sep 25 '17 at 12:55
  • @xaphod there are better answers now. – Cœur Nov 7 '17 at 1:31

All the answers that are using the height are only half part of the story for one reason. If you're going to check like that when device orientation is landscapeLeft or landscapeRight the check will fail, because the height is swapped out with the width.

That's why my solution looks like this in Swift 4.0:

extension UIScreen {
    ///
    static var isPhoneX: Bool {
        let screenSize = UIScreen.main.bounds.size
        let width = screenSize.width
        let height = screenSize.height
        return min(width, height) == 375 && max(width, height) == 812
    }
}
  • Just use nativeBounds instead – Leo Dabus Feb 14 at 18:34
struct ScreenSize {
    static let width = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.width
    static let height = UIScreen.main.bounds.size.height
    static let maxLength = max(ScreenSize.width, ScreenSize.height)
    static let minLength = min(ScreenSize.width, ScreenSize.height)
    static let frame = CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: ScreenSize.width, height: ScreenSize.height)
}

struct DeviceType {
    static let iPhone4orLess = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxLength < 568.0
    static let iPhone5orSE = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxLength == 568.0
    static let iPhone678 = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxLength == 667.0
    static let iPhone678p = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxLength == 736.0
    static let iPhoneX = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && ScreenSize.maxLength == 812.0

    static let IS_IPAD              = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad && ScreenSize.maxLength == 1024.0
    static let IS_IPAD_PRO          = UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad && ScreenSize.maxLength == 1366.0
}

Swift 3 + 4:

without need of any device size pixel value

//UIApplication+SafeArea.swift

extension UIApplication { 

    static var isDeviceWithSafeArea:Bool {

        if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {
            if let topPadding = shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.top,
                topPadding > 0 {
                return true
            }
        }

        return false
    }
}

Example:

if UIApplication.isDeviceWithSafeArea {
     //e.g. change the frame size height of your UITabBar
}
#define IS_IPHONE (UI_USER_INTERFACE_IDIOM() == UIUserInterfaceIdiomPhone)
#define IS_IPHONE_X (IS_IPHONE && [[UIScreen mainScreen] bounds].size.height == 812.0f)
  • 2
    it will return you 812 if you upload Default image for iPhone X. Till then I think it will return you iPhone 7 size, not sure though... – Fahim Parkar Sep 13 '17 at 8:40
- (BOOL)isIphoneX {
    if (@available(iOS 11.0, *)) {
        UIWindow *window = UIApplication.sharedApplication.keyWindow;
        CGFloat topPadding = window.safeAreaInsets.top;
        if(topPadding>0) {
            return YES;
        }
        else {
            return NO;
        }
    }
    else {
        return NO;
    }
}
  • 1
    Best answer! Without need of any device size pixel value. – Peter Kreinz Jan 17 at 10:01

Usually, the Programmer needs it for constraining to top or bottom, so these methods can help

static func extraTop() -> CGFloat {

    var top: CGFloat = 0

    if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {

        if let t = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.top {
            top = t
        }
    }
    return top
}

static func extraBottom() -> CGFloat {

    var bottom: CGFloat = 0

    if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {

        if let b = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.bottom {
            bottom = b
        }
    }
    return bottom
}

For before iPhone X these methods return: 0

For iPhone X: 44 and 34 accordingly

Then just add these extras to top or bottom constraints

For those getting 2001px instead of 2436px for the native bounds height (like me), it is because you built your app with an older SDK, before iOS 11 (Xcode 8 instead of Xcode 9). With an older SDK, iOS will display the apps "black boxed" on the iPhone X instead of extending the screen edge-to-edge, beyond the top "sensor notch". This reduces the screen size which is why that property returns 2001 instead of 2436.

The simplest solution is to just check for both sizes if you are only interested in device detection. I used this method for detecting FaceID while building with an older Xcode SDK which doesn't have the ENUM value specifying the biometric type. In this situation, device detection using screen height seemed like the best way to know whether the device had FaceID vs TouchID without having to update Xcode.

I elaborated on your's on else's answers and made swift extension on UIDevice. I like swift enums and "everything in order" & atomized. I've created solution that works both on device & simulator.

Advantages: - simple interface, usage e.g. UIDevice.current.isIPhoneX - UIDeviceModelType enum gives you ability to easily extend model specific features and constants that you want to use in your app, e.g. cornerRadius

Disadvantage: - it's model specific solution, not resolution specific - e.g. if Apple will produce another model with the same specs, this won't work correctly and you need to add another model in order to make this work => you need to update your app.

extension UIDevice {

    enum UIDeviceModelType : Equatable {

        ///iPhoneX
        case iPhoneX

        ///Other models
        case other(model: String)

        static func type(from model: String) -> UIDeviceModelType {
            switch model {
            case "iPhone10,3", "iPhone10,6":
                return .iPhoneX
            default:
                return .other(model: model)
            }
        }

        static func ==(lhs: UIDeviceModelType, rhs: UIDeviceModelType) -> Bool {
            switch (lhs, rhs) {
            case (.iPhoneX, .iPhoneX):
                return true
            case (.other(let modelOne), .other(let modelTwo)):
                return modelOne == modelTwo
            default:
                return false
            }
        }
    }

    var simulatorModel: String? {
        guard TARGET_OS_SIMULATOR != 0 else {
            return nil
        }

        return ProcessInfo.processInfo.environment["SIMULATOR_MODEL_IDENTIFIER"]
    }

    var hardwareModel: String {
        var systemInfo = utsname()
        uname(&systemInfo)
        let machineMirror = Mirror(reflecting: systemInfo.machine)
        let model = machineMirror.children.reduce("") { identifier, element in
            guard let value = element.value as? Int8, value != 0 else { return identifier }
            return identifier + String(UnicodeScalar(UInt8(value)))
        }

        return model
    }

    var modelType: UIDeviceModelType {
        let model = self.simulatorModel ?? self.hardwareModel
        return UIDeviceModelType.type(from: model)
    }

    var isIPhoneX: Bool {
        return modelType == .iPhoneX
    }
}
  • Instead of using Mirror, it will be faster to use sysctlbyname as done in Cloud9999Strife answer (and in my answer too). – Cœur Sep 21 at 17:16

I rely on the Status Bar Frame height to detect if it's an iPhone X :

if UIApplication.shared.statusBarFrame.height >= CGFloat(44) {
    // It is an iPhone X
}

This is for application un portrait. You could also check the size according to the device orientation. Also, on other iPhones, the Status Bar may be hidden, so the frame height is 0. On iPhone X, the Status Bar is never hidden.

  • You can hide iPhoneX statusBar in controller with this: - (BOOL)prefersStatusBarHidden { return YES; } Then the statusBar’s height is 0. – 无夜之星辰 Sep 28 at 8:18
  • @无夜之星辰 I check this at boot time in the AppDelegate. – Tiois Oct 1 at 12:42

I was using Peter Kreinz's code (because it was clean and did what I needed) but then I realized it works just when the device is on portrait (since top padding will be on top, obviously) So I created an extension to handle all the orientations with its respective paddings, without relaying on the screen size:

extension UIDevice {

    var isIphoneX: Bool {
        if #available(iOS 11.0, *), isIphone {
            if isLandscape {
                if let leftPadding = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.left, leftPadding > 0 {
                    return true
                }
                if let rightPadding = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.right, rightPadding > 0 {
                    return true
                }
            } else {
                if let topPadding = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.top, topPadding > 0 {
                    return true
                }
                if let bottomPadding = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow?.safeAreaInsets.bottom, bottomPadding > 0 {
                    return true
                }
            }
        }
        return false
    }

    var isLandscape: Bool {
        return UIDeviceOrientationIsLandscape(orientation) || UIInterfaceOrientationIsLandscape(UIApplication.shared.statusBarOrientation)
    }

    var isPortrait: Bool {
        return UIDeviceOrientationIsPortrait(orientation) || UIInterfaceOrientationIsPortrait(UIApplication.shared.statusBarOrientation)
    }

    var isIphone: Bool {
        return self.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone
    }

    var isIpad: Bool {
        return self.userInterfaceIdiom == .pad
    }
}

And on your call site you just:

let res = UIDevice.current.isIphoneX

I had to solve the same issue recently. And while this question is definitively answered ("No"), this may help others who need iPhone X specific layout behaviour.

I wasn't really interested in whether the device was iPhone X. I was interested in whether the device had a notched display.

private static var hasNotchedDisplay: Bool {
    if let window = UIApplication.shared.keyWindow {
        return (window.compatibleSafeAreaInsets.top > 20.0 || window.compatibleSafeAreaInsets.left > 0.0 || window.compatibleSafeAreaInsets.right > 0.0)
    }

    return false
}

You could also write a hasOnScreenHomeIndicator variable along the same lines (though check the bottom safe area, maybe?).

The above uses my extension on UIView for convenient access to the safe area insets on iOS 10 and earlier.

@objc public extension UIView {
    @objc public var compatibleSafeAreaInsets: UIEdgeInsets {
        if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {
            return safeAreaInsets
        } else {
            return .zero
        }
    }

    @objc public var compatibleSafeAreaLayoutGuide: UILayoutGuide {
        if #available(iOS 11.0, *) {
            return safeAreaLayoutGuide
        } else {
            return layoutMarginsGuide
        }
    }
}

Alternatively, you can check out 'DeviceKit' pod. Once installed, all you need to do to check the device is:

import DeviceKit
let device = Device()
if device == .iPhoneX {
  // place your code here
}

Do NOT use screen pixel size as other solutions have suggested, this is bad as it can result in false positives for future devices; will not work if UIWindow hasn't yet rendered (AppDelegate), won't work in landscape apps, and can fail on simulator if scale is set.

I've, instead, made a macro for this purpose, it's very easy to use and relies on hardware flags to prevent the aforementioned issues.

Edit: Updated to support iPhoneX, iPhone XS, iPhoneXR, iPhoneXS Max


To Use:

if (IS_DEVICE_IPHONEX) {
    //do stuff
}

Yup, really.


Macro:

Just copy paste this anywhere, I prefer the very bottom of my .h file after @end

#import <sys/utsname.h>

#if TARGET_IPHONE_SIMULATOR
#define IS_SIMULATOR YES
#else
#define IS_SIMULATOR NO
#endif

#define IS_DEVICE_IPHONEX (\
(^BOOL (void){\
NSString *__modelIdentifier;\
if (IS_SIMULATOR) {\
__modelIdentifier = NSProcessInfo.processInfo.environment[@"SIMULATOR_MODEL_IDENTIFIER"];\
} else {\
struct utsname __systemInfo;\
uname(&__systemInfo);\
__modelIdentifier = [NSString stringWithCString:__systemInfo.machine encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];\
}\
NSString *__iPhoneX_GSM_Identifier = @"iPhone10,6";\
NSString *__iPhoneX_CDMA_Identifier = @"iPhone10,3";\
NSString *__iPhoneXR_Identifier = @"iPhone11,8";\
NSString *__iPhoneXS_Identifier = @"iPhone11,2";\
NSString *__iPhoneXSMax_China_Identifier = @"iPhone11,6";\
NSString *__iPhoneXSMax_Other_Identifier = @"iPhone11,4";\
return ([__modelIdentifier isEqualToString:__iPhoneX_GSM_Identifier] || [__modelIdentifier isEqualToString:__iPhoneX_CDMA_Identifier] || [__modelIdentifier isEqualToString:__iPhoneXR_Identifier] || [__modelIdentifier isEqualToString:__iPhoneXS_Identifier] || [__modelIdentifier isEqualToString:__iPhoneXSMax_China_Identifier] || [__modelIdentifier isEqualToString:__iPhoneXSMax_Other_Identifier]);\
})()\
)
  • The only reason I can think for detecting iPhoneX is to avoid the notch at top of screen; if so you can check the safeArea.top to detect the size of said notch. Just make sure you measure it after UIWindow has loaded, so not during viewDidLoad but one thread-cycle after: if (@available(iOS 11.0, *)) { [UIApplication sharedApplication].keyWindow.safeAreaInsets.top } – Albert Renshaw Jul 25 at 6:33

There are several reasons to want to know what the device is.

  1. You can check the device height (and width). This is useful for layout, but you usually don't want to do that if you want to know the exact device.

  2. For layout purposes, you can also use UIView.safeAreaInsets.

  3. If you want to display the device name, for example, to be included in a email for diagnostic purposes, after retrieving the device model using sysctl (), you can use the equivalent of this to figure the name:

    $ curl http://appledevicenames.com/devices/iPhone10,6
    
    iPhone X
    

For a quick fix, I like this:

let var:CGFloat = (UIDevice.current.userInterfaceIdiom == .phone && UIScreen.main.nativeBounds.height == 2436) ? <iPhoneX> : <AllOthers>

The best and easiest way to detect if the device is iPhone X is,

https://github.com/stephanheilner/UIDevice-DisplayName

var systemInfo = utsname()
uname(&systemInfo)
let machineMirror = Mirror(reflecting: systemInfo.machine)
let identifier = machineMirror.children.reduce("") { identifier, element in
guard let value = element.value as? Int8 , value != 0 else { return identifier}
            return identifier + String(UnicodeScalar(UInt8(value)))}

And identifier is either "iPhone10,3" or "iPhone10,6" for iPhone X.

In Portrait only I use the view's frame's width and height to check:

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    // iPhone Xr: -414 x 896
    // iPhone Xs Max: -414 x 896
    // iPhone X, Xs: -375 x 812

    if view.frame.width == 414 && view.frame.height == 896 || view.frame.width == 375 && view.frame.height == 812  {

        print("iPhone X")
    } else {

        print("not iPhone X")
    }

}

The portrait screen dimensions are listed here

enter image description here

protected by Anbu.karthik Jan 4 at 9:22

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.