14

Swift 4 has Codable and it's awesome. But UIImage does not conform to it by default. How can we do that?

I tried with singleValueContainer and unkeyedContainer

extension UIImage: Codable {
  // 'required' initializer must be declared directly in class 'UIImage' (not in an extension)
  public required init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
    let container = try decoder.singleValueContainer()
    let data = try container.decode(Data.self)
    guard let image = UIImage(data: data) else {
      throw MyError.decodingFailed
    }

    // A non-failable initializer cannot delegate to failable initializer 'init(data:)' written with 'init?'
    self.init(data: data)
  }

  public func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws {
    var container = encoder.singleValueContainer()
    guard let data = UIImagePNGRepresentation(self) else {
      return
    }

    try container.encode(data)
  }
}

I get 2 errors

  1. 'required' initializer must be declared directly in class 'UIImage' (not in an extension)
  2. A non-failable initializer cannot delegate to failable initializer 'init(data:)' written with 'init?'

A workaround is to use wrapper. But are there any other ways?

  • 3
    What if you create a sub class of UIImage that confirms to Codable and add required initializer on that. – Torongo Sep 13 '17 at 12:49
  • 1
    Why exactly do you want to conform UIImage to Codable? Images generally aren't good candidates for being encoded to formats such as JSON or XML. Usually it's better to encode the image separately, and then encode for example a URL in the JSON. – Hamish Sep 13 '17 at 14:52
  • 1
    If you need to save your image inside a JSON string just convert your image data to a base64 string and save it as a string – Leo Dabus Sep 13 '17 at 16:13
  • 1
    @Hamish @LeoDabus I don't mention json or xml in my question. I think you suggest JSONEncoder? but it is just one implementation of Encoder protocol – onmyway133 Sep 13 '17 at 17:08
  • 1
    @onmyway133 My main question was just asking why you wanted this :) The rest was an assumption based on the current (and commonly used) encoders/decoders now provided by Foundation. – Hamish Sep 13 '17 at 17:18
13

A solution: roll your own wrapper class conforming to Codable.

One solution, since extensions to UIImage are out, is to wrap the image in a new class you own. Otherwise, your attempt is basically straight on. I saw this done beautifully in a caching framework by Hyper Interactive called, well, Cache.

Though you'll need to visit the library to drill down into the dependencies, you can get the idea from looking at their ImageWrapper class, which is built to be used like so:

let wrapper = ImageWrapper(image: starIconImage)
try? theCache.setObject(wrapper, forKey: "star")

let iconWrapper = try? theCache.object(ofType: ImageWrapper.self, forKey: "star")
let icon = iconWrapper.image

Here is their wrapper class:

// Swift 4.0
public struct ImageWrapper: Codable {
  public let image: Image

  public enum CodingKeys: String, CodingKey {
    case image
  }

  // Image is a standard UI/NSImage conditional typealias
  public init(image: Image) {
    self.image = image
  }

  public init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
    let container = try decoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)
    let data = try container.decode(Data.self, forKey: CodingKeys.image)
    guard let image = Image(data: data) else {
      throw StorageError.decodingFailed
    }

    self.image = image
  }

  // cache_toData() wraps UIImagePNG/JPEGRepresentation around some conditional logic with some whipped cream and sprinkles.
  public func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws {
    var container = encoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)
    guard let data = image.cache_toData() else {
        throw StorageError.encodingFailed
    }

    try container.encode(data, forKey: CodingKeys.image)
  }
}

I'd love to hear what you end up using.

UPDATE: It turns out the OP wrote the code that I referenced (the Swift 4.0 update to Cache) to solve the problem. The code deserves to be up here, of course, but I'll also leave my words unedited for the dramatic irony of it all. :)

  • 3
    thanks. Did you know I implemented that 😉 Please see the commits – onmyway133 Sep 21 '17 at 5:23
  • Ah, well I certainly know now! 😂 It hadn't occurred to me that the world could be that small. Lesson learned. Hmmm, doesn't that also mean that 'my' answer is the Accepted one, hmmm? – AmitaiB Sep 24 '17 at 17:31
  • Hi, I would like to see if there's any clever solution than mine – onmyway133 Sep 25 '17 at 9:00
10

You can use very elegant solution using extension for KeyedDecodingContainer and KeyedEncodingContainer classes:

enum ImageEncodingQuality: CGFloat {
    case png = 0
    case jpegLow = 0.2
    case jpegMid = 0.5
    case jpegHigh = 0.75
}

extension KeyedEncodingContainer {

    mutating func encode(_ value: UIImage,
                         forKey key: KeyedEncodingContainer.Key,
                         quality: ImageEncodingQuality = .png) throws {
        var imageData: Data!
        if quality == .png {
            imageData = value.pngData()
        } else {
            imageData = value.jpegData(compressionQuality: quality.rawValue)
        }
        try encode(imageData, forKey: key)
    }

}

extension KeyedDecodingContainer {

    public func decode(_ type: UIImage.Type, forKey key: KeyedDecodingContainer.Key) throws -> UIImage {
        let imageData = try decode(Data.self, forKey: key)
        if let image = UIImage(data: imageData) {
            return image
        } else {
            throw SDKError.imageConversionError
        }
    }

}

Here is an usage example:

class DocumentScan: Codable {

    private enum CodingKeys: String, CodingKey {
        case scanDate
        case image
    }

    let scanDate: Date
    let image: UIImage

    required init(from decoder: Decoder) throws {
        let container = try decoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)
        scanDate = try container.decode(Date.self, forKey: .scanDate)
        image = try container.decode(UIImage.self, forKey: .image)
    }

    func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws {
        var container = encoder.container(keyedBy: CodingKeys.self)
        try container.encode(scanDate, forKey: .scanDate)
        try container.encode(image, forKey: .image, quality: .png)
    }
}

PS: You can use such way to adopt Codable to any class type

7

One way to pass an UIImage is to convert it to something that conforms to Codable, like String.

To convert the UIImage to String inside func encode(to encoder: Encoder) throws:

let imageData: Data = UIImagePNGRepresentation(image)!
let strBase64 = imageData.base64EncodedString(options: .lineLength64Characters)
try container.encode(strBase64, forKey: .image)

To convert the String back to UIImage inside required init(from decoder: Decoder) throws:

let strBase64: String = try values.decode(String.self, forKey: .image)
let dataDecoded: Data = Data(base64Encoded: strBase64, options: .ignoreUnknownCharacters)!
image = UIImage(data: dataDecoded)
4

Properly most easiest way is to just make it Data instead of UIImage:

public struct SomeImage: Codable {

    public let photo: Data

    public init(photo: UIImage) {
        self.photo = photo.pngData()!
    }
}

Deserialize:

UIImage(data: instanceOfSomeImage.photo)!

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