I was looking into a piece of code written by others when I saw this:

a(), void(), b();

where both a and b are instances of a user-defined template class, which is intended to act like a function by overloading operator() that returns the calling instance itself.

Part of the class:

template <typename T>
class SomeClass{
    public:
    SomeClass& operator()(void);
    const SomeClass& operator()(void) const;
}

The return statements for both overloads are the following:

template <typename T>
SomeClass<T>& SomeClass<T>::operator()(void){
    // do stuff
    return *this;
}

template <typename T>
const SomeClass<T>& SomeClass<T>::operator()(void) const{
    // do stuff
    return *this;
}

What does the void() between them do? I feel it strange.

  • 8
    No authoritative answer can be given without more context. C++'s grammar is quite complicated. For example 'X *p' could mean either multipliation, or a pointer declaration. You need to provide more context. – Sam Varshavchik Sep 13 '17 at 13:18
  • 2
    Lots of BS in the comments thus far. Comments are not for guessing answers. Correct answer below. – Bathsheba Sep 13 '17 at 13:19
  • 2
    This is a valid question and shouldn't be getting downvotes. – Simple Sep 13 '17 at 13:20
  • 3
    Actually, @Bathsheba, given the additional context posted, the answer below is not correct. – Sam Varshavchik Sep 13 '17 at 13:20
  • 3
    Where is void() in the posted code? – n.m. Sep 13 '17 at 15:14
up vote 45 down vote accepted

The void() prevents an overloaded operator, from being called (where one of the parameters is of the type SomeClass<T>), as such an overload can't have a parameter of type void.

You will most often see this used in templates, and is used in variadic pack expansions:

// C++11/14:
int unpack[] = {0, (do_something(pack), void(), 0)...};
// C++17 (fold expression):
(void(do_something(pack)), ...);

Where an overloaded operator, could ruin the sequencing guarantees of the language.

  • 3
    Wow. I've never heard that someone overloads operator,. – iBug Sep 13 '17 at 13:20
  • 3
    @iBug: The Boost Spirit boys do it all the time. – Bathsheba Sep 13 '17 at 13:21
  • 5
    @iBug - This is C++, we can overload everything. EVERYTHING! – StoryTeller Sep 13 '17 at 13:21
  • 3
    Not quite yet: the member selection operator and ternary conditional operators being important exceptions. (Although doesn't Stroustrup want to relax the former?) – Bathsheba Sep 13 '17 at 13:25
  • 2
    @iBug: fun fact : I did it to manage date/time format depending on the language. (std::cout, lang::fr) << time;. It was funny. :-p – Caduchon Sep 13 '17 at 13:28

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