14

Simple question I think, but I just can't seem to find an answer.

I am writing a cookie in a Java Servlet with the Cookie class which is sent to the browser in the response headers like the following:

Set-Cookie: test=somevalue; Domain=.mydomain.org; Expires=Thu, 06-Jan-2011 18:45:20 GMT; Path=/

I am doing this via the Cookie class in the Servlet 2.5 API. I need to add "HTTPOnly" to the end of this String, which the Servlet 2.5 API does not support. No problem, I'll just create the String manually and append "HTTPOnly" to the end...

However, in doing so, the challenge I ran into is that to set the "Expires" header there in the first place, I used .setMaxAge(3600), which creates the "Expires" part of that String. However, since I can't use the Cookie class, I need to create the value of of that "Expires" portion.

So basically, how can I make "3600" formatted to "Thu, 06-Jan-2011 18:45:20 GMT"?

Note: I could probably figure out the correct pattern with DateFormat, but I was hoping there was a better way to do it. Another thought: Use the Cookie class as before then just convert the Cookie into the corresponding header string programatically, then just append "HTTPOnly" to the end. But I am not aware of any way to take the Cookie object and convert it to the corresponding String value.

So optionally, how can I take a Cookie object and convert it to the corresponding String value programatically?

Thanks!

25

Something like this :

Date expdate = new Date ();
expdate.setTime (expdate.getTime() + (3600 * 1000));
String cookieExpire = "expires=" + expdate.toGMTString();
...

.. and since toGMTString() is deprecated

Date expdate= new Date();
expdate.setTime (expdate.getTime() + (3600 * 1000));
DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, dd MMM yyyy HH:mm:ss zzz", java.util.Locale.US);
df.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
String cookieExpire = "expires=" + df.format(expdate);
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, I'm pretty sure that the "toGMTString" method is deprecated though. – JasonStoltz Jan 7 '11 at 13:50
  • I ended up using a slightly different pattern (see my answer) to match what the Servlet container was generating, and I was hoping to find a way that avoided using a DateFormat at all. However, this should work and there are no other answers, so I am marking this as the answer. – JasonStoltz Jan 10 '11 at 14:15
  • 3
    When formatting date headers, it is important to call SimpleDateFormat constructor with java.util.Locale argument, e.g., new SimpleDateFormat("dd MMM yyyy kk:mm:ss z", Locale.US) – martinsb Apr 4 '12 at 13:32
  • 4
    FYI, IE10 seems to reject this format string. Using new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, dd-MMM-yyyy HH:mm:ss zzz", Locale.ROOT) fixes it. – mckamey Oct 1 '13 at 17:38
  • 1
    The exact spec for cookies is at tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6265#section-5.1.1 which is surprisingly loose. However, the format "EEE, dd MMM yyyy HH:mm:ss zzz" (spaces instead of hyphens) is compatible and is also the HTTP-date format used in HTTP headers (w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec3.html#sec3.3.1). – Sampo Jul 30 '15 at 9:01
18

Java 8 now supplies an appropriate date formatter, DateTimeFormatter.RFC_1123_DATE_TIME:

OffsetDateTime oneHourFromNow 
        = OffsetDateTime.now(ZoneOffset.UTC)
        .plus(Duration.ofHours(1));

String cookieExpires 
        = DateTimeFormatter.RFC_1123_DATE_TIME
        .format(oneHourFromNow);

// E.g. "Tue, 8 Nov 2016 20:15:46 GMT"

This format is valid for the the expires attribute, see RFC 6265 § 4.1.1, which defines the format to be an RFC 1123 date:

expires-av        = "Expires=" sane-cookie-date
sane-cookie-date  = <rfc1123-date, defined in [RFC2616], Section 3.3.1>
| improve this answer | |
  • Good answer, and correct. But I suggest using OffsetDateTime rather than ZonedDateTime to be more clear about your intentions. We have only UTC involved here rather than a true time zone, so OffsetDateTime is appropriate. A true time zone is an offset-from-UTC plus a set of rules for handling anomalies such as Daylight Saving Time (DST). – Basil Bourque Nov 8 '16 at 22:14
  • @BasilBourque, you're right, OffsetDateTime is semantically more correct than ZonedDateTime, I have edited accordingly. – kuporific Nov 8 '16 at 22:48
  • 1
    We can also use plusDays(x) where x is integer – prem30488 Mar 4 at 10:34
7

Well, I haven't seen much activity on this question, so I'm going to attempt to answer this in order to provide help to anyone looking for an answer in the future. However, I'll leave it open to give others an opportunity to jump in if they choose.

So there were a couple of options that I considered...

1)

Apache Commons HTTPClient project has a "DateUtil" class that I was hoping would work. http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x/apidocs/org/apache/commons/httpclient/util/DateUtil.html. This provides convenience methods to format the date into a few standard formats to communicate dates in http headers... however, none of them seemed to match exactly what was being returned by the servlet container.

2)

Apache Commons also has a Cookie class in that project, which has a "toExternalForm" method that returns a String. Using that, I thought I may have been able to just create the cookie per usual, call "toExternalForm", then append "HTTPOnly". http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x/apidocs/org/apache/commons/httpclient/Cookie.html. That might work, but I didn't bother trying.

3)

I finally decided just to use a pattern that matched what my Servlet container was returning, regardless of whether it was a standard format or not. If it is what the Servlet container returns, then it should work, right? Why not...

SimpleDateFormat COOKIE_EXPIRES_HEADER_FORMAT = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE, dd-MMM-yyyy HH:mm:ss zzz");
COOKIE_EXPIRES_HEADER_FORMAT.setTimeZone(new SimpleTimeZone(0, "GMT"));
Date d = new Date();
d.setTime(d.getTime() + 3600 * 1000); //1 hour
String cookieLifeTime = COOKIE_EXPIRES_HEADER_FORMAT.format(d);
response.setHeader("Set-Cookie", "test=somevalue; Domain=.mydomain.org; Expires=" + cookieLifeTime + "; Path=/; HTTPOnly");
| improve this answer | |
2

The first answer given by JasonStoltz is the correct one:

1) Apache Commons HTTPClient project has a "DateUtil" class that I was hoping would work. http://hc.apache.org/httpclient-3.x/apidocs/org/apache/commons/httpclient/util/DateUtil.html. This provides convenience methods to format the date into a few standard formats to communicate dates in http headers... however, none of them seemed to match exactly what was being returned by the servlet container.

Use a DateTime library to get a date object for one hour in the future (or whatever time), and then use the Apache DateUtil class. That class outputs according to the RFC, so you do not have to worry that it does not match what your servlet 'usually produces' - browsers will respect the RFC!

Your code will look something like this:

// for one hour later (should probably use date libraries in general, this is somewhat awkward)
Date expiresDate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 3600*1000); 
response.setHeader("Set-Cookie", "Expires=" + DateUtil.formatDate(expiresDate) + ";");
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Awesome schimmy. Your code snippet snippet sets the "Expires" header though, not "Set-Cookie". – JasonStoltz Mar 7 '13 at 14:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.