40

int.TryPrase is great and all, but there is only one problem...it takes at least two lines of code to use:

int intValue;
string stringValue = "123";
int.TryParse(stringValue, out intValue);
....

Of course I can do something like:

string stringValue = "123";
int intValue = Convert.ToInt32(string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(stringValue) ? 0 : stringValue); 

on just one line of code.

How can I perform some magic to get int.TryParse to use a one liner, or is there yet a third alternative out there?

Thanks!

Bezden answered the question best, but in reality I plan on using Reddogs solution.

  • Whilst a little late to this party...I totally agree, it would be nice to have TryParse as a one liner, but the suggestions here are not very nice. C# 6.0 had a language proposal that would have allowed this syntax... bool result = int.TryParse("123", out int value); // value = 123 – series0ne Jun 29 '16 at 8:28
  • related: if you are casting int to int? you can do int.TryParse("string", out int result) ? result: result, so the compiler won't get mad – smurtagh Mar 2 '18 at 16:14
64
int intValue = int.TryParse(stringValue, out intValue) ? intValue : 0;
  • 8
    Nice. The only problem, of course, is that you can't differentiate between a bad value and a 0 in the input string... it takes away the point of using TryParse() – James King Jan 6 '11 at 22:23
  • 2
    Nice. I can dig it. – O.O Jan 6 '11 at 22:23
  • 1
    @James: I don't agree... that dependes on the context. – Tomas Jansson Jan 6 '11 at 22:24
  • 1
    Well, if the user enters "gobbledygook" in a textbox that expects an int, do you want to blaze ahead using '0' instead? Or do you want to tell the user about their error and let them correct it to get the results they're really after? – James King Jan 6 '11 at 22:28
  • 3
    How does this code not scare people? I much prefer @Reddog's extension method. – Joel Rondeau Jan 6 '11 at 22:30
38

Maybe use an extension method:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static int TryParse(this string input, int valueIfNotConverted)
    {
        int value;
        if (Int32.TryParse(input, out value))
        {
            return value;
        }
        return valueIfNotConverted;
    }
}

And usage:

string x = "1234";
int value = x.TryParse(0);

Edit: And of course you can add the obvious overload that already sets the default value to zero if that is your wish.

  • 1
    +1 You might want to include the usage int x = "123".TryParse(1); – Conrad Frix Jan 6 '11 at 22:26
  • I wanted to add the same solution as above with int num = "123".ToInt(); but you were faster! for that get +1 – Delashmate Jan 6 '11 at 22:33
12

This answer is only for those who use at least C# 7.

You can now declare the out parameter inline.

int.TryParse("123", out var result);

Exemplary usage:

if (int.TryParse("123", out var result)) {
    //do something with the successfully parsed integer
    Console.WriteLine(result);
} else {
    Console.WriteLine("That wasn't an integer!");
}

MSDN: https://docs.microsoft.com/de-de/dotnet/csharp/whats-new/csharp-7#out-variables

3

I would create an extension method out of this.

    public static int? AsInt32(this string s)
    {
        int value;
        if (int.TryParse(s, out value))
            return value;

        return null;
    }
  • This is the best solution here because in one line we get the successful parsed value and we can still differentiate between a string that doesn't parse and the string "0" – Luis Ferrao May 28 '13 at 8:37
1

I don't think there is anything really beautiful, but if you like this you get it down to one row:

string stringValue = "123"
int intValue = int.TryParse(stringValue, out intValue) ? intValue : 0;
1

Check out the StringExtensions class. It contains an AsInt(String,Int32) extension method that will attempt to convert a string and if unsuccessful populate it with the supplied Int32 value as default.

Example:

var intValue = "123".AsInt(-1);
  • I don't have that method accessable by default ?! (.net Framework 4.5) – Muflix Nov 19 '15 at 10:13
0

You do not WANT to make int.TryParse() one line. Why? Because you can't make an assignment to intValue if the input string isn't a valid integer. The whole point of TryParse() is to allow you to test for good input and degrade gracefully, rather than having to catch an exception.

Int.TryParse() is already a shortcut so you don't have to test for a valid int and do the assignment in two steps... that's as far as you want to take it.

  • Thanks, but I disagree to all of your points. They are simply not true. – O.O Jan 6 '11 at 22:45
  • 3
    Fair enough : ) – James King Jan 6 '11 at 22:48
0

Because it essentially returns two values (success and the value), we really do need the two lines.

You could try a wrapper class, ie:

void Main()
{
    var result = simpleIntParser.TryParse("1");
    if(result)
    {
        Console.WriteLine((int)result);
    } else {
        Console.WriteLine("Failed");
    }

    result = simpleIntParser.TryParse("a");
    if(result)
    {
        Console.WriteLine((int)result);
    } else {
        Console.WriteLine("Failed");
    }


}

public class simpleIntParser
{
    public bool result {get; private set;}
    public int value {get; private set;}

    private simpleIntParser(bool result, int value)
    {
        this.result = result;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static simpleIntParser TryParse(String strValue)
    {
        int value;
        var result = int.TryParse(strValue, out value);
        return new simpleIntParser(result, value);
    }

    public static implicit operator int(simpleIntParser m)
    {
        return m.value;
    }

    public static implicit operator bool(simpleIntParser m)
    {
        return m.result;
    }
}

It requires casting if the type is ambiguous (i.e. for Console.WriteLine()), but if you pass it as an integer parameter for example, no casting is required

  • Whoa whoaaaaa, wait what's .Dump()? – O.O Jan 6 '11 at 22:32
  • It's from linqPad, sorry. It just prints it to screen. – Rob Jan 6 '11 at 22:33
0
int val2 = "asd".AsInt(-1); 
//Output : -1
 int val3 = "123".AsInt(-1); 
//Output : 123

You need to have System.Web.WebPages namespace.

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